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Which Sharpening Stone for Wusthof Classic Ikon?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi, I have been spending a lot of time trying to decide which knife set to purchase.

I think I have finally decided on the "Wusthof Classic Ikon 7-piece Deluxe Knife Block Set"

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/wusthof-classic-ikon/deluxe-knife-block-set-p120293

 

Now I am unsure of which sharpening stone to purchase for it. I was looking at Wusthof ones, since I am buying Wusthof knives, but that probably doesn't really matter. I just don't want to ruin these knives. I use whetstones at work, but am unsure of the grit# of it because they are so worn and used.

 

I was leaning towards this one http://www.cutleryandmore.com/wusthof/combination-ceramic-water-stone-base-p16011

because I think the 400 & 2000 grit sounds good. Also, it looks like the one I use at work which I am comfortable using.

 

But than there is also this one http://www.cutleryandmore.com/wusthof/fine-combination-ceramic-water-stone-base-p113930 which is 400 & 1000 grit, and also comes with a cool case.

 

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/wusthof/tri-hone-water-stone-sharpener-p131660 Seems pretty cool too, but I'm not sure if I like the low 240 grit. I feels like that might eat away too much on my blade. But the extra 1000 & 3000 grit seem pretty cool. Also on that cool little triangle thing.

 

Anyways, just looking for some feedback.

Thanks!

post #2 of 14
With soft stainless I use Choseras 400 and 800 (JIS 500 and 1200). Avoid high polishing, it won't hold. A 2k may be useful for deburring, though, just as split leather.
post #3 of 14

I am not a fan of the like, mediocre steel and high price/performance ratio, but since I'm stuck with an Ikon slicer until I find one I like in one of the super alloys, This is how I handle it:

 

I sharpen to a rather steep 12deg angle on a 1-6K waterstone, then finish on a fine Arkansas to a slightly less acute angle, essentially microbeveling.  I have to true the edge frequently on the Ark due to the relative softness of the metal (X50cromo, also known as German stainless).

 

I have not found much trouble dealing with the bur on this material, but Benuser's techniques work well on some difficult stainless I have, even though I finish with a much finer stone.

 

I feel a polished edge actually holds up better, particularly when using Arks, and can be maintained with a reasonable amount of fuss and is worth it.

 

If Ikon is really what you want then any brand of waterstone will do.  Actually for any steel any brand will do, though harder steels really benefit from more aggressive cutters. You can seach older posts to find recomendations of best value, dishing characteristics, etc.

 

Rick

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

Wow, that sounds like quite the process you use to sharpen your knife.

 

Why don't you like the Ikon?

 

Which other knife would you recommend instead of it?

post #5 of 14
Everyone has their own preferences, and that's okay. To be honest, out of that whole block, I would only use the chef's and the utility knife. The steel is too soft for me. The chef is too short, too fat, and I don't like german rocking profiles. Where wusthof excels is in taking abuse.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffj83 View Post
 

Wow, that sounds like quite the process you use to sharpen your knife.

 

Why don't you like the Ikon?

 

Which other knife would you recommend instead of it?

#1 my sharpening is actually pretty simple, requiring little time, relatively inexpensive equipment, and not too much different from what most here go through in some form or another.

 

#2 is about as MK says.  They look good, fit and finish are great, but the steel is unexceptional, performing much like knives at half the cost or less.  My Ikon slicer has a nice grind but their chefs (most everyones go-to knife) is far from what most around here consider ideal.

 

As to which knife is going to suite you best, we would need more input as to what you feel your preferences are.  Try searching here on this subject and you will begin to see the important considerations many of which you likely have not yet thought to considered.

 

 

Rick

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies!

 

 

I've done a good amount of research trying to find the perfect knife for me. But there is just so much on the internet, and everyone has a different opinion.  I have gone to a few stores around me, and they didn't carry all the different makes and brands that I have found on the internet. So it's hard to choose without holding the knife in my hand, and cutting a few things.

 

The reason I went with the Ikon Block Set is because I want a knife block to store all my knives in. And it seemed cheaper than buying an empty block, a chef's knife, a bread knife, a steel..  So this one seemed like the best one in my price range. The only block sets I could really find were by Wusthof or Zwilling. So that seemed to limit my choices a bit.

 

Plus I like to use the rocking motion to cut things, so that's why I was looking at mostly euro knives. I also like to pick up food with the blade after cutting it, so a wider blade would be nice as well..

 

Honestly the Miyabi Kaizen was the only other knife I could find other than a Wusthof or Zwilling that looked like I might like it. (besides maybe a cheaper brand like Victorinox.)

 

Any suggestions for any knife I might not have found or noticed would be appreciated.

 

Thanks!

post #8 of 14
On kkf you said you already bought this set. I think you overpaid, but if you rock chop then the wusthof is an okay choice. Because it is fat and soft, the edge will hold up better to rock chopping. However when you cut something like onion, it will wedge and fall apart.
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

Actually I haven't bought this knife set yet.

You think that I overpaid?? I couldn't find the Classic Ikon Set anywhere else for cheaper than 370$

 

What thinner knife would you recommend for onions and stuff?

post #10 of 14
Any gyuto or santoku by Misono, Hiromoto, JCK Kagayaki, a chef's knife by Robert Herder, Solingen, or K-Sabatier.
post #11 of 14

Well buying knife sets in their entirety are discouraged here to begin with.  Just the most recent posts here will provide the reasons against these sets and nearly all the suggestions needed in choosing a number of knife types and examples that are really what you will find most useful as well as cost effective.

 

As far as blocks go you have a wide variety to choose from on Amazon, all wood and very inexpensive.  Some alternatives to the typical "blocky" type block that my wife simply won't tolerate, the last is the one I use for my go-to knives.  There are also magnetic arrangements and sayas to consider.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/wusthof/walnut-tiered-knife-block-aluminum-base-p115685

 

BTW, my 9" Ikon slicer was had for $80 (lots to be had on ebay for similar or less), so that set you showed is overpriced, as well as containing nothing much you really want as your starter set.

 

 

Rick

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice.

I think that I'll wait a bit before buying this set, and crunch some numbers on different knives + a block + a steel, and compare.

 

I'm really interested in checking out some Japanese knives now.  I'll have to go to a local store and try a few out.  I'm thinking of getting one German chef's knife that I'm more used to, and maybe a thinner Japanese blade for cutting veggies and stuff.

post #13 of 14

As a starter set, for my home knives, I use the Bodum Bistro Knife Block. Fits all my knives comfortably, performs well, and has held up strong now for about 2 years. $60. 

 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003NG2DB2/ref=twister_B003XII6DE

 

I'm not going to step in here and claim to know even half of what these guys know. For my work set, I've mixed and matched from a bit of what I like from different companies. I have a Wusthof Classic 3.5" Paring Knife, a Victorinox Fibrox 8" Chef's Knife, and a Victorinox 6" Flex Boning Knife. These are my 3 go to knives that I use just about every day. I've only had to sharpen the Chef's knife once since January and I hit it with a Wusthof Honing Steel at the beginning of the day, and it takes care of business. I've used a number of subpar knives in restaraunts over the years, and only a small handful of decent ones. I love my knives. I have no idea what the high-end ones feel like, but my chef's knife has an awesome rocking action, is thin enough to take care of veggies with no problem, and strong enough to tackle everything I've thrown at it so far. So, they may not be the fanciest things out there, but they're incredibly functional and economical.

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by BayouByrnes View Post
 

As a starter set, for my home knives, I use the Bodum Bistro Knife Block. Fits all my knives comfortably, performs well, and has held up strong now for about 2 years. $60. 

 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003NG2DB2/ref=twister_B003XII6DE

 

I'm not going to step in here and claim to know even half of what these guys know. For my work set, I've mixed and matched from a bit of what I like from different companies. I have a Wusthof Classic 3.5" Paring Knife, a Victorinox Fibrox 8" Chef's Knife, and a Victorinox 6" Flex Boning Knife. These are my 3 go to knives that I use just about every day. I've only had to sharpen the Chef's knife once since January and I hit it with a Wusthof Honing Steel at the beginning of the day, and it takes care of business. I've used a number of subpar knives in restaraunts over the years, and only a small handful of decent ones. I love my knives. I have no idea what the high-end ones feel like, but my chef's knife has an awesome rocking action, is thin enough to take care of veggies with no problem, and strong enough to tackle everything I've thrown at it so far. So, they may not be the fanciest things out there, but they're incredibly functional and economical.

 

Can't argue with BayouB's points of function/economy.  I just picked up a brand new 10" Vitronox Rosewood chefs (much nicer handle than the Fibrox but otherwise the same knife) for $44 and change on ebay, it will eventually be a gift for some friend/acquaintance who doesn't have a decent knife.  Performance wise they are about on par with the Ikon, maybe slightly softer steel, not sure, yet.

 

A stainless knife sharpened on a steel might do for most prep work but it would not be pretty for me to try and make 1mm< slices of salad onion, carrot and celery with it, much less so apples.

 

 

Rick


Edited by Rick Alan - 8/2/14 at 1:44pm
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