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Satay sause

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Some advice needed. Im going to be making about 40 gallons of satay sause next week. Peanuts, peanutbutter, coconut milk, chilis, bit of oyster sause and some sambal olek. Ive made it many times before but have always served if ala minute. This time ill be blast chilling it and portioning cold with chicken and noodles to be reheated by microwave a portion at a time. Im a bit concerned with the sause seperating upon reheat. Any thoughts or tips on keeping it bound together.
post #2 of 8
Xantham gum
post #3 of 8
Could you portion the satay sauce and heat at the same time as the noodles?
Give the sauce a good stir and the pour over the meal.
I find that a good stir solves/masks the separation.
Good luck! I have made lots od satay sauce, but never those amounts

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post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
@butzy. That would be my way to, thing is it will be portioned with chicken and noodles, vacume sealed and reheated by the consumer in a micro,( it for a cos play convention) so there is no possibility for that.

@alaminute Have you used it? I never have, Im heading to the Asian importer,supply today and I betting they have it. Is there a good ratios to use? Any taste? Any tips?

These amounts dont daunt me but the style of serving is new so its a learning expierence.
post #5 of 8

Could you do a sample pack and try it?

It sounds like the sauce is basically all spread around the noodles and chicken and in that case I would think that the sauce shouldn't separate when heated on medium/low in the microwave. Maybe put an instruction on the vacuum pack that says to stir it after heating?

 

I initially thought it would be on a plate with the sauce on top and there I could see it being a bigger problem (presentation wise)

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post #6 of 8
I use xantham all the time for so many sauces it's great! Suggested use is like a knife tip but I go full teaspoon usually which is considered ALOT. It binds and thickens like nothing else. The drawback is it often takes on a kind of snotty texture.
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Well I went to the Asian importer store yesterday and picked up a sample of what the Thai/Asian places use and it was pretty good and a decent pricepoint considering the lack of labor involved. Its a ready made product but for the application Im using it for it will work just fine.
@ alaminute. Im still going to get some xantham gum and play with it.
post #8 of 8
Nice, I'm glad you figured out something that you know will work at least. It's all about the finished product.
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