or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › Looking to relocate to start fresh, Any suggestions?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Looking to relocate to start fresh, Any suggestions?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Hey Crew, So lets jump to it. I grew up in NY all my life (29 now) and honestly, I am tired of NY. I've been working in the industry for awhile (12 years) front and back of house, so I got all sides of the business. I am a sous chef now at where I am working. However, we are closing this month due to owners financial problems.

 

So I've been thinking of relocating for a long time because NY just doesn't excite me anymore, I've seen it , done it and can't stand it at times anymore, I get really bored. Too many past experience living here, and if you know, NY is small, people know people so you can't really avoid people at time so I guess I am a little fed up. There is more to it but this is what ticks me to boredom.

 

So I've been thinking somewhere warm climate but not superficial like NY or Miami etc. I was thinking of San Fran? would you suggest this is good for living, and work related? 

 

Iam also scared to make the jump all these years because if I pretty much just pick up my things and starting over in a new town and not know anyone would scare me. 

 

Any suggestions would help because I plan on making my move by the end of this month.

post #2 of 19

You get really bored in NY? and NY is small? are you talking about New York, Texas..?

 

I kind of get what you mean about getting sick of the city. I got so sick of it, I moved to CT, but I've never heard anyone be bored by it, or describe it as small. San Fran feels much smaller than the city for sure. It's almost exactly half the size of the city. You walk back and forth and you're done.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
I meant nyc feels smaller now, I grown up all my life here. Everyone knows everyone to some extent. You can't really avoid old flames or former school mates, you bound to run into someone sooner or later. Maybe it's just me but I'm ready to make a move.

Doesn't help that all my buddies drift apart after school and most of them will end up here forever. I guess I am open minded in what's more out there?
post #4 of 19

I see.. are you limited to places only within the mainland in the US? I know that the culinary scene in PR is rapidly growing, and it's growing fast. It actually made #20 on this list I was there last Sept, and San Juan is so beautiful, and all the restaurants...you don't know what place to eat at first.

 

http://eater.com/archives/2011/09/14/here-is-a-list-of-americas-best-cities-for-foodies.php

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #5 of 19
I've heard san fran is super expensive to live. Anywhere with name resto's like that is gonna be super competitive on the sous/chef level as well, meaning you might have to take a step back to get a job.
post #6 of 19
Forget warm go with cold. Come to Alaska. There is always work here. Most, like myself, take jobs in bush lodges. Generally you get paid hourly plus room and board. Get a nice place and you get tips. Let me tell you nobody tips more then hunters and fishermen at a lodge here. Then also theres the benefit of the total cooking freedom. So come to Alaska. Get a bull cook. Make a lodge yours and have an adventure.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thank you for replies guys. I took it as considerations for my move. I am definitely a warm climate kind of person so Alaska is out lol, Maybe someday but not anytime soon. I lived in NY so I would imagine its similar in cost, besides san fran, I have no real insight on where its hot for culinary work/live etc. 

 

Any more suggestions would help! Thanks

post #8 of 19

What about Hawaii? Kona coast on the big island is starting to take off. Lots of opportunities there.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #9 of 19

Look into Charleston, SC. Beautiful city, good weather, nice people, and fantastic food scene. I used to live there for a short while a few years ago--the area has exploded as a food scene in the last 5 years or so. 


Some serious talent in that town, great local products too. Great history of cuisine (low country cooking, deep southern cooking) and great culture in general. 

 

I sometimes think about moving back.


Boston is also cool (though I know you said warmer climates) and a great town. There is a great food scene there too, and the city has a lot of culture/history. 

post #10 of 19
The food scene here in Kansas City is getting all sorts of national attention. The town is exploding with high quality homegrown restaurants, and a bevy of James Beard award winning chefs whose proteges are opening successful restaurants left and right.

We are close to lots of farms and have access to awesome pork, beef and produce. The chef driven restaurants in this town are well supported. Food & Wine's Best New Chef this year was from Kansas City, as was James Beard's Best Chef Midwest.

The last 5-10 years has seen Kansas City emerge as one of the most exciting new food destinations in the country, and most the recent lists from the major national publications have reinforced that.

With the weather, you have to be able to handle all four seasons though. It usually gets hot in the summer and cold in the winter. This Spring and Summer have been awesome though. 70's and 80's so far. Its only cold for 2-3 months, and not "snow shoes hiking to the store" cold.

Best of all is the cost of living. Here, $800 a month BUYS a three bedroom house in a middle class neighborhood. A decent two bedroom apartment can be had for $400/mth rent.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
post #11 of 19

Philly. 

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by youngchefkarl View Post
 

Philly. 

 

You make a great case

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post
 

 

You make a great case

 

 

Lol, he convinced me ..

post #14 of 19

(All right let me try)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt Lake City.

post #15 of 19

I've just started working in NYC several months ago (I also worked here very briefly, for about a month a couple years ago, both times in high end places) and until recently spent my life living and working in Jersey (except for when I lived away at college).  I'm sure growing up here must be another level, but I have noticed that when working in high end restaurants it seems that everyone knows someone somewhere, and it does make it feel small, even though it's the biggest city in the county with the most restaurants.  It seems like I can go up to any other cook and say, "Oh, hey, you worked here?  Do you know so and so."

 

Anyway, San Fran definitely has a great food scene in the area, but the cost of living is also high.  Hawaii, although I know nothing about the the food scene, has an extremely high cost of living.  I mean, it's in the middle of the Pacific.  For one thing, anything you may want probably has to get flown there, and can be very expensive, not to mention every time you want to fly to the mainland.  A couple of my previous bosses were from Hawaii and would always complain about those two things, then again, I've heard homeless people have a decent life there.  They chill on a beach and fish and if it's raining they hang out under a tent until it stops, so there's that haha.

 

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Las Vegas yet.  Lots of great restaurants there and a lot of michelin stars.   I would imagine the cost of living is pretty low.  Also, many of restaurants, the goods ones especially I'm sure, are in hotels/resorts and are probably union, and I hear the unions there are VERY serious.  It's also constantly busy and I image very challenging.  I guess it's similar to the city.  The last place I worked at had a sous from Las Vegas (shortly before I worked there) and he was supposedly very good but left because it was too slow/boring haha.

 

You said you did not want to go to Miami, but there are other areas in Florida you may want to check out.  There is a lot of money around Naples and so some good restaurants, too.  I wouldn't bother with Orlando tho, especially Disney.  Everyone that I have talked to that worked there has told me horror stories lol.

 

If NYC doesn't treat me well, I just may end up fishing on a beach in Hawaii haha.  Anyway, my suggestions would be either San Fran of Vegas. And maybe Naples, but I don't know a whole lot about it.

 

Good luck where ever you decide to go!

post #16 of 19

I lived in Atlanta, GA back in the mid 1990's.  They had a great food scene and was a blast for a young, unattached person in their 20's.  Not sure how the food scene is nowadays but I imagine that there is still some serious dining going on, and after NYC, Atlanta will seem cheap.

 

Also, I know you are talking warm, but you should consider Chicago.  They have an awesome food scene and a lot of great neighborhoods to explore and again, coming from NYC, will see rather inexpensive.

 

If you are thinking about SF, I would go out there and check it out first.  They have a great food scene, and you're not far from wine country, and I should love it, but there is just something about the city that I don't care for.  I can't put my finger on it but there is something about the city that just gets on my nerves.  And even by NYC standards SF is not cheap!!!

post #17 of 19

I'm telling you, check out Charleston, SC. Great up and coming food scene, low cost of living, nice climate, and they need good cooks. 

post #18 of 19

I'd suggest looking into Portland, Maine. The food scene is awesome, as is most everything in Portland. I think it's second only to San Fran for restautants per capita. Love Portland.

post #19 of 19

I put my plug in for Houston, TX.  The food scene here is really good, but kind of under the radar.  Life is pretty calm compared to most big cities. Cost of living is really quite affordable and you have a wide range of places where to set up shop.  What I love most about Houston is that it is the type of city that may not be great to visit (not really touristy), but it is great to live in! There are so many places to explore and discover no matter what you scene is.  Love art, we have a great museum district.  Into music?  Houston has a great variety of live music venues for just about every taste.  The only negative is the heat.  From about mid May to almost November the weather is simply but damn hot!  But you should really consider Houston.  There are a number of great eateries all over the place.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › Looking to relocate to start fresh, Any suggestions?