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Need advice for using a tarte ring

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

The recipe I'll be following is for the Alsatian Apple Tarte on page 186 of Peterson's Baking.  It uses a tarte ring which I possess but never used.  It appears that the ring will be placed on an inverted sheet pan that provides the bottom for the ring.  And the dough is placed into the ring and blind baked.  There appears to be no way of freezing a dough beforehand.

 

Should a piece of parchement paper be placed between the dough and the sheet pan??

 

After the final bake with filling is completed and the tarte completely cooled, it can be slid from the sheet pan onto a piece of cardboard and then slid/transferred onto the serving platter without, heh heh, cracking and deforming.

 

Okay are any of you out there experienced using tarte rings???  Do you have any tips or corrections to any of my comments that I've made?

 

 

 

Best.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #2 of 11
Usually a tart ring will have 2 pieces.
post #3 of 11
I think they are technically called 'flan'rings. They work great for tarts. Definitely use parchment.
post #4 of 11
Sorry accidentally replied without finishing. It should have a removable bottom so when you bake the dough there is no hassle removing it. If your cooking it on a sheet pan with just the mold use parchment on the bottom and spray everything with pan spray or use butter. If I were you I would find a 2 piece tart pan with the mold and removable bottom and skip the hassle.
post #5 of 11
P.S. I don't often use a sheet pan or cookie sheet under a flan ring, but an aluminum pizza plate. That I'd much easier to fit in a fridge to cool the dough down before baking.
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

@chef Reginald:  I'm referring to the bare ring without a bottom, a one-piece job.  A tart ring and not a fluted tarte pan.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #7 of 11

The answer to your question is "yes."

 

I make a Plum Financier this way.

Butter the fluted ring and place on a piece of parchment on a sheet pan.

Place your dough in the pan and create your shell.

 

If you're blind baking it, you'll need to poke tiny holes in the shell and place in the fridge to chill before baking.

You may have to weight the shell as it's baking to keep it from rising.

 

Good luck.

post #8 of 11

Buttering a flan/tart ring seems like a good thing, and it certainly is a good safety measure... but I've never exprienced sticking with a butter or shortning crust.  Between the fat in the crust and shrinkage the situation works out well with "dry" rings.  Filling leakage will negate everything I've written, though.  Do so if you chose but if you do not don't worry because chances are extremely high that there will be no problem.

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

In the photos for the recipe cited in the O.P., it shows that once the crust is blind baked, the ring is removed, the crust filled with the apples and "custard" mixture, and baked again.

 

Hmmm, I never would have imagined baking a filled crust without the ring.  How about you?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #10 of 11

That is conceivable... but I wouldn't.

post #11 of 11
Depending on the dough. Be cautious if it's a light flake butter dough I would not remove the ring.
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