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repairing a broken tip?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Broke a tiny bit of the tip of my tojiro shirogami gyuto any tips when im going to the stones?

To hard cutting board its bamboo?
post #2 of 11

My approach is to just let it wear in as you sharpen it normally. Unless it's bigger than you made it sound. 

 

While there has been much denigration of bamboo boards as too hard, it's more likely the glue is harder than the bamboo. Still, I don't think a glue line would have snapped the tip. Most likely, you just had a large carbide near the tip that was no longer well seated in the steel matrix from normal wear and when it popped free, it weakened the tip enough that basic use made it fail.  

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Okey thanx mate its tiny maybe 1mm to 1,5 mm

Yeah it changed color before it breaked off to?
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Se that.people.recomend blending inn the spine?
post #5 of 11
That tends to start adding belly at the tip which I don't like personally. It looks better to many. I prefer to let the profile just wear into that point naturally and maintain the original profile. If I worked in public or otherwise professionally with the blade, I might feel differently.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Ok så just sharpen my edge as always unntil it is a tip there?
post #7 of 11

Yes.

 

People have different tolerances for flaws on the edge of their blade. I've got a chip in the middle of my blade still. It will likely survive a few more sharpenings before being totally gone. In use with food, I don't notice it. I can tell it's there when I draw cut free hanging newsprint because it catches there every time. Some would sharpen until it was gone, but it doesn't impact my actual use of the blade for cooking. If I needed a very cleanly cut edge on paper, I would have to polish it up and remove the chip. But that's not the use of this blade. And in reality, it may well have a new chip in a different location when I get the current one sharpened out. And I'm OK with that for kitchen work. 

 

Your preferences may vary and you should sharpen to suit them. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Ok thanks mate.:-)
post #9 of 11
@phatch: to maintain the original profile one would have to abrade some material working from both the spine and edge, which is the traditional technique for tip repair. Or am I missing something?
post #10 of 11
To be totally purist, yes. Matching the finish and texture on the spine is another reason to avoid that in general. In my opinion of course. it's often pretty close to just evenly take the whole edge up. I've seen many just rework the edge at the tip alone for such things, ignoring the overall profile. I am not a fan of that approach.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #11 of 11
Thanks, Phatch. I would rather say, work from the spine, and with normal sharpening all will get alright.
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