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choose the right sharpening stone for my knifes

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

hi :)

 

I came from Italy and own a F. Dick ProDynamic chef knife 10 inches and a 7-Inch zwilling santoku motion (it's not a 4 stars http://database.zwilling.com/artikel...63312/size/600). 

Now I own just a very cheap stone 300 grit (I paid that some like 3-4$). but I think who it's better if I use that just for train my self with old knifes. am I right? 

 


what's the kind of sharpening stone who I need for my two knifes (I can spend less than 55$)?  

how can I understood if a stone\brand has a good quality? 

 

what's the right grit for the steel of my knifes? maybe a combo 600\1000? 400\1000?

 

 

thank you

post #2 of 4
I'd suggest if you are going to use a two grit stone go with the 600/1000. If you take good care of your knives that's all you really need in combination with a steel to hone the edge. Shun makes some good stones. Stay away from the cheap stones. It's your knives that get damaged not so much the stone. I use vegetable oil to keep the friction down when sharpening on the stone. It takes a little practice but it's really not too difficult. Just keep your western knives at a 22.5 degree angle. ( just a little steeper than a match book) and work the bald back and forth on the rough grit till the desires edge is there. These switch to your fine grit to get that nice fine edge. After that take the blade over your steel to straighten it back up and boom your done. Just remember every time you sharpen it you are removing metal from the blade. So try and work it with your steel rather than your stone when possible. I hope this helps. Also there is plenty of good stuff on YouTube.
post #3 of 4

There are a few types of sharpening stones.   What rwking198 is talking about is typically called a whetstone.  You can use them dry or with oil.  A lot of posts on this forum are about japanese water stones which are only used with water, and sometimes need to be soaked.  Don't use oil on a waterstone or the other way around. 

 

Step one is to choose which way you want to go.  Cheaper water stones like King cut slower and require soaking, so it could take a long time for your stainless knife (X55CrMo14 steel same as wusthof and forschner btw).  Water stone is basically required for the harder steels used in japanese knives.  In your case, either type is fine. Whetstone might be easier to pick up and go.  Especially if you're in a rush.

 

If you only have one stone, you want something about 1000 grit, a medium grit stone.  90% of your sharpening should be done on that.  The 300 grit stone you have is used for repairing chips or broken tips, etc., anything that requires a lot of metal to be removed. 

post #4 of 4

For whetstones aka oilstones:

 

 

http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/   ...for the Norton Tri Hone that's geared toward butchers and meat cutters

 

http://www.hallsharpstones.com/    ...for Arkansas finishing stones, surgical stones.


Edited by kokopuffs - 7/25/14 at 7:10am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
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