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Gelatin leaves

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I want to use gelatin leaves in place of powdered gelatin. I looked on the web and there is conflicting info on whether one can substitute leaf gelatin for powdered gelatin. So I thought I would ask the experts here.

post #2 of 11

SylviaM,

In the pastry world it is very common to use sheet instead of powder. I has a better shelf life and seems more consistent.

The pakg are usually a higher bloom then the sheet. I would definitely try small batch to achieve a correct bloom before finalizing a formula. I think the pkg are maybe 2 1/2 tsp. We usually convert this to 3-4 sheets 200.

HTH's

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post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks @panini

I was looking at buying these:

http://www.amazon.com/PerfectaGel-Gold-Gelatin-Sheets-Bloom/dp/B009GK1B6M/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1406295843&sr=8-1&keywords=gelatin+leaves

 

I have powdered gelatin in (the Knox packages) I just emptied a package and the powder weighs 8 grams. I can't find many recipes for using leaf gelatin, and had read where it has a better shelf life and gives a clearer set.

post #4 of 11

SylviaM,

Try this http://www.modernistpantry.com/gelatin-sheets-gold.html

The 40 sheet is  about .36

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post #5 of 11

SylviaM,

I did not know your quantity output. If your going to use a lot then we use chef rubber. the gold runs around $96. for 500 sheets 220.

That should be under .20 each.

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post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

@panini No, not going to use a lot. Just a home cook. Just like to have friends for dinner occasionally and love to make cakes, desserts and chocolates :)

Do you recommend the Modernist pantry brand instead of the ones I was looking at?

post #7 of 11

No, use the purveyor you're comfortable with. I haven't had a bad batch of sheets in 40 yrs.

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post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

@panini - thanks for your help. I'll purchase from the link you provided - has some good info there, and for first order it is free shipping :)

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

The gelatin leaves arrived a few days ago. I made an orange gelatin. Was so good, better than Jello! Will never buy Jello again:)

 

I got the gold as per your post @panini  and was looking for other recipes using gelatin leaves and came across one, but it called for bronze. Is it Ok to use gold instead of bronze. I don't really understand the grades of the gelatin.  Most of the recipes I came across just said gelatin leaves, didn't specify a grade.

post #10 of 11

There are 3 grades of gelatine sheets, bronze, silver and gold, with each level costing more than the last.

 

So what's the difference?

 

Gelatin strength is measured in "Bloom", and uses a contraption to test it  that was invented by a man called, you guessed it "Bloom".  Basically it's a rod of a specific length and diameter.  The rod is plunged into a sample of gelatin and the depth of the rod's penetration is measured.  What all this basically means is that the higher the number of bloom strength, the harder the gelatin is is.

 

So bronze sheets are the largest of the bunch, silver slightly smaller, and gold even smaller.  Bronze has the weakest bloom strength (and therefor the cheapest) and more is needed to get the job done.  Silver has slightly stronger bloom strength so less is needed.  Gold is the strongest, so even less is needed.

 

Sheets are preferred by pros for two reasons:

1) You can count off the sheets very quickly for accurate dosage . No messing around with teaspoons of powdered gelatin or .233 of an ounce of powdered gelatin

 

2) You can soak the sheets very quickly, give them a quick wring, and toss them in whatever you are making.  With powdered you have a very great possibility of the powder clumping in the water, so not all of it has swollen and will melt easily, giving you lumps or clusters of hard, dry gelatin granuals in your dish.

 

Hope this helps

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post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 


Thanks @foodpump the recipe I was looking at called for 12g of bronze gelatin leaves. (usually the recipes I have been looking at just say how many gelatin leaves). I was hoping I wouldn't have to buy different "blooms" of gelatin leaves. As I said in my post I bought the gold.  This is my first time using gelatin leaves. (who says you can't teach old dogs new tricks LOL). I loved the orange gelatin I made, served it with heavy cream mixed with zest of an orange and whipped. (I had made the whipped cream to fill profiteroles and I had quite a bit of the cream left over, so made the orange gelatin to use it with)

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