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debating Bluestar vs. Lacanche range for remodel

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I am torn between the Bluestar and the Lacanche. Bluestar owners who LIKE it say "It has changed the way I cook! I love it!" but there is a small but vocal minority of bitter complaints about lemon Bluestars and unresponsive customer service for defects. Lacanche owners swoon about their ranges but mostly talk about the beauty of the range. Lacanche is undeniably gorgeous and their quality control seems more consistent. However, how does it perform? I simply can't spend the $$$ for a range that is mainly eye candy and works "pretty good." If the Lacanche combines its good looks with great performance, I think I would choose it over the Bluestar. If the Bluestar cooks significantly better and costs less, that tips the balance the other way.

 

Help!

post #2 of 8

@mbwestfall if it were me I would go with the bluestar it looks like it is better built and will last longer. While the Lacanche looks nice function over form for me. I have not used either of these but the bluestar looks very similar to what I used in the professional kitchen. Something that works great, can take a beating and will last a long time. 

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Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #3 of 8


If you are a serious cook and are going to spend this much for these 2 brand. Why not add a few dollars and buy a real restaurant range, it will outlast your lifetime if kept clean.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 8

... I assume chefedb means something else, because a "real restaurant range" is a fire hazard for residential use, and code won't allow it.

 

For pro-style home ranges, Bluestar is much loved; Capital (which I have) has fans too.  

 

Re changing how you cook, the main thing a more muscular range will give you is more BTU when you want it.  This is nice to have, but I can't say I'm really cooking differently as a result, just saving a few seconds here and there.

 

*Also* check on simmering - how well the cooktop does low heat.  

 

The Gardenweb Appliance Forum is an absolute fire-hose of discussion of these things.  You may have already found it.  Obligatory nagging: be sure you have ventilation (both hood plus fan and makeup air)  adequate to your BTUs.

post #5 of 8

@Colin good call on the ventilation that is a must for this kind of range.  What made you go with the capital over the bluestar?

 

@chefedb honestly many of the kitchens I worked in did not have ranges as nice as the bluestar. So I think you are getting a great deal.

 

Just my two cents regarding expensive ranges. As someone who cooked professional for many years all I have is a simple stove. It is a Jenn Air 5 burner that cost about $1,000.00.  In terms of cooking it is fine it has an 18,000 btu burner and a simmer with convection. My only complaint is that the handles are plastic and for the money I spent they should of been die-cast since the plastic breaks a lot.

 

I have been in a number of homes with $3,000 and $7,000 ranges and honestly I felt it was a huge waste of money. Unless you're firing that baby up day after day and using it to provide a high volume of meals I really think it is overkill. It is funny but almost all of my chef friends have normal ranges it is the at home cook foodies that have big dollar high end stoves. 

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #6 of 8
This is the third year with the Lacanche range. I LOVE it. Love the burners high heat (range from 7,000 BTUs - 18,000 BTUs, designed for easy cleaning, no computerized bells and whistles, and en croute (small space) oven which roasts a picture perfect, moist 26# turkey and the assorted BTUs on the burners. Allow three months from order to delivery. Each range is made to the owner's specs. Mine has gas burners and electric ovens (prefer drier heat for backing). Excellent customer service; calling the toll free number for tech assist has always ended in positive results. For home adjustments or parts replacement, see online videos for Lacanche. In addition to the wonderful cooking experience afforded by this range, our French Blue Lacanche is beautiful to look at when not in use!
post #7 of 8
Hi! What did you decide to buy and how did you like it? I have been looking at La Cornue VS wolf (I currently own a Wolfand thinks it's amazing) but the Cornue is stunning. The 60" Wolf has a ton of interior oven cooks space, but the Cornufe 110 model is only 43' and the interior cook space is really small. The Chateau is much bigger, but at $50,000 it isn't an option. Last night, I stumbled upon Lacanche and The size works with really cool oven options, delivers on eye candy, but I have no idea how it actually functions. Would love to hear from you!
post #8 of 8
Welcome to ChefTalk, CZFlies. Don't wait long for an answer from Tramble. That post was a year ago and the only post ever made by that person. Before that, the thread is another year older. Don't worry about it. This happens all the time. The 2 guys who really know what they're talking about may very well come back to the conversation. If I had the $$$ to buy a new stove ... I'm going with the Bluestar.

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
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