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Choosing my first knife.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hi Guys,

 

I'm a student in Australia, cook quite often at home and I'm passionate about it. My house owner actually have a set of Global knives at home and allow me to use them. At the beginning it was great, but over time without sharpening, chopping with it is getting more and more dangerous. The owner actually doesn't do any sharpening himself and doesn't own any sharpening tools, the kitchen gears were mainly for collection purpose until I moved in. Therefore, I am thinking of getting a chef knife myself, something similar to the Global (Shun's knife is looking good to me). I'm willing to spend ~$200 on the knife and ~$100 for the sharpening tools. Any good suggestions :)?

 

Regards,

Franky

post #2 of 17
Have you had a look at japanese chefs knives, metalmaster, blueway japan etc ?

There are a lot of options for $200.

I haven't listed any north american outlets as that is $30-40 shipping.
$7-15 from Japan.

Do you want western handle or japanese handle ?

Have a look at what's available and see what takes your fancy.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

For the handle I prefer whole metal attach to blade > wooden > plastic and other material, but overall I'm not too fuss about the handle as long as there's a good balance.

 

I had a look on Japanese chef knives

 

Gekko and Shiki blades are such beauty but then I saw Echizen Japan Santoku one, I just felt in love (but it is a little bit more expensive).

 

I'm not so sure about the quality though, got any ideas?

 

PS. Santoku is the shape that I wanted, Saji VG-10 Nickel Custom Damascus Series is looking pretty good as well. Hope you have an idea of which type that I'm looking for :)

post #4 of 17
I've got a shiki petty, inazuma (wa handled version of gekko) nakiri and a saji damascus (green handled) 180 mm gyuto.

I like them all, they sharpen yp well
post #5 of 17
Bugger.

They sharpen up well and hold an edge - also look good, I'm a sucker for damascus.
post #6 of 17
Maybe get some stones first and sharpen up the globals?

I actually don't care about balance, I think it is overrated. My gyutos are very light compared to a german knife. Part of the reason is the thinness of the blade, but also that wa handles run lighter. Actually with a knife this light, I prefer it to be blade heavy for a little more power.
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post

Maybe get some stones first and sharpen up the globals?

I actually don't care about balance, I think it is overrated. My gyutos are very light compared to a german knife. Part of the reason is the thinness of the blade, but also that wa handles run lighter. Actually with a knife this light, I prefer it to be blade heavy for a little more power.

 

Hi,

 

The globals are actually not mine so I want to own my own knife. :)

post #8 of 17

I second the http://japanesechefsknife.com/  recommendation.  They have $7 flat shipping worldwide.  That's probably the best for you in Australia.

 

For anyone reading this who might make recommendations, you are looking for a stainless western handled gyuto, right?  Length preference?

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

I second the http://japanesechefsknife.com/  recommendation.  They have $7 flat shipping worldwide.  That's probably the best for you in Australia.

 

For anyone reading this who might make recommendations, you are looking for a stainless western handled gyuto, right?  Length preference?

 

It's a choice between Santoku and Gyuto. The blade comes first and handle is really a second preference, so far I'm loving the damascus blade so much. Would anyone has an idea about damascus blade performance?

post #10 of 17

There was a very good thread about it recently here:

 

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/19228-What-is-the-point-of-damascus

 

Basically in your price range, you're talking about damascus san mai cladding which is a visual preference only.  It doesn't affect the performance.  I don't mind it, but I won't pay extra looking for it.  Damascus can look good or tacky. IMO the good looking ones start to fade over time from use and scratches from sharpening; then you're looking at stuff like re etching. 

 

re-etching article: http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/showtopic.php?tid/798351/

post #11 of 17
The gyuto would be more versatile than a santoku.
Damascus is purely aesthetic, but it's what got me into Japanese knives smile.gif
You'll pay more for it than for a plain blade - I think it's worth it.
I've had my Inazuma and Saji for over a year, they haven't started fading yet. Don't know when that will start happening.
Makes no difference to cutting, at least not to me.
The knives you've looked at will all be a good introduction to Japanese knives.
There are guys on this forum who can get into quite detailed discussions about blade profiles, width and weight etc which is way over my head.
The main thing for me is that I prefer the lightness associated with a Japanese handle. Having said that, it's not a massive difference, to me, with a western handle.
I originally bought the Saji for my wife as she likes the 180 length. I have started using it a lot more recently, mainly since I cracked the sharpening thing. Must admit that I rather like it now.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys, I have a rough idea of what to get now. What about the sharpening tools? Just a whetstone and ?
post #13 of 17
Whetstone - the king 1000/6000 is regularly recommended. I have the JCK 1000/4000. I personally prefer splash and go, a lot less hassle than soaking for 10 mins.
Wine corks for deburring - you can use other methods.
Either a bench strop or rod. I made myself a bench strop from some roo leather on ebay.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hi guys, I made my decision and picked the 210mm Gekko Gyuto as a starter. I was deciding between that and 210mm Shiki Buck eye wood handle Gyuto but I thought I might start off with a cheaper one. And I also bought a 1000/6000 King whetstone, is that all that I need for now?
post #15 of 17
Apart from some wine corks you look good to go.
smile.gif
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 

Gonna buy a couple bottles of wine just for that :lol:

post #17 of 17

Hi Franky,

Take a look at Carter Cutlery on YouTube.  Some good sharpening stuff.

Doug


Edited by dsiddens - 11/11/14 at 5:53pm
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