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pizza dough

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi guys, im just after some advice if anyone is able to help. we have installed a new wood fire pizza oven and we are becoming busier and busier and am not being able to keep up with rolling our dough to order. my question is: is there a way to pre roll pizza dough for the night without the dough sticking to the trays its stored on? we have tried polenta on the trays but they still seem to stick and you lose half your topping when attempting to put in the oven...........

post #2 of 11
Maybe you should look at your dough- the consistancy, temperature, and recipe can affect how easy it is to work. Or, you can buy a dough roller...
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

we do have a dough roller but again... they cant sit on a try any longer than 5 minutes otherwise they stick.

post #4 of 11
Lite olive oil and cornmeal is how we did it a few years ago.
post #5 of 11
We just floured the schnozzberries out of everything. But we didn't pre roll... they were rolled to order.
How long does it take the machine to roll a pizza?
post #6 of 11

Hand tossing is the fastest.  You can toss the crust in 15 seconds when it's proofed correctly and the right temperature.

post #7 of 11
I'm with Kuan, lite roll and hand toss is fastest, all depends on your dough.
post #8 of 11
I don't think anyone pre rolls- the things to look at are your dough, your process, and whether you need another body(one to roll and top while one cooks)
post #9 of 11
We 'stretch' the dough balls.... basically pressing them flat to prepare them for the final shaping. We use a blend of semolina and AP flour that is applied liberally on each piece. We move about 100 pies a day on slow days and upwards of 250 on a solid Friday. This process works well for us. Hope this helps.
Edited by Jim Berman - 8/7/14 at 5:47am

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

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post #10 of 11

I have done this before en mass.

I think maybe the trays are the answer.

You don't say what kind of trays.

I used to work in a cafeteria food court that made pizzas.

I was the one to make the dough, roll them, place them on a rack then into the cooler for the next day.

The trays we used were round and about 14-16" in diameter and they were perforated.

I simply sprayed them with pan release, placed the rolled dough on them and that was it.

I could put 2 pizza dough's on one sheet pan and the rack held 22 pans.

I hope this helps.

post #11 of 11

I have to agree with Jim, if you're getting a return on the dough when rolling and it's taking too long, your dough might be to tight.

A slack dough is soo much better.  Pat it round and stretch or vise versa. I just am assuming you're going thin in the WB oven. Those puppies should only

hit the bricks for 2 maybe 3 min. at a good temp . Some type of flour on the bottom will give you those nice quarter size charrs. good luck

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