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Cornish Pasty questions

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

May I get some weigh-in on any recommendations for mass quantity cornish pasty making? Equipment: food processor/mixer/hand, oven type, ingredients: flour type, lard/margarine/butter? Thanks so much!

post #2 of 19

I have never heard of Cornish pastry can you define/explain what that is?

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #3 of 19
Nicko
Here's a site with a traditional Cornish pasty (locals prounce as pahhhstees!) recipe.
Traditionally, pasties are crimped/plaited on the side although many commercially baked pasties baked outside the Duchy of Cornwall atre crimped on the top!

http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/recipe.pdf


ETA I believe Cornish miners who emigrated to the USA took the tradition of pasties with them. I can't quite recall where but Michigan or Maine or Pennsylvania seem to come to mind biggrin.gif
post #4 of 19

Michigan, Upper Penninsula

post #5 of 19

The history of pasties in the UP:

 

http://www.hu.mtu.edu/vup/pasty/history.htm

 

And a bunch of recipes, including a large qty recipe used by Michigan Tech Dining Services:

 

 

http://www.hu.mtu.edu/vup/pasty/recipes.htm

 

 

Pasties, smoked fish and thimbleberry and bilberry jams are cottage food industries up there.

post #6 of 19

I live in Michigan's UP and know all about the Pasty.

 

The Finnish people brought the pasty here.

It was a quick easy healthy item the miners could take to work each day.

 

If you were to set up a pasty making facility you'd need:

 

Large mixer to make the dough.

Assorted knives for cutting, chopping, and slicing

Stovetop for cooking the ingredients and making gravy

 

The dough, you would have to research. If you are planning on re-thinking that pasty you may want to consider other flours and such, but the main recipe is quite simple and bland. Some Fin's use rutabaga, while others use potatoes, some may use ground beef where others might hand mince beef to add to the filling.

 

 

Lard, by far is the best ingredient for the dough. The crust is quite flaky and rich.

 

Best of luck.

post #7 of 19

In Ontanogan they credit the Cornish immigrants with the pasty.  I've never heard the Finnish adoption part of the story.  Very interesting.

post #8 of 19

What is the difference between Pasties and Figybottom? sp?

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post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 

You think a mixer wouldn't compromise the flakiness of the dough? I was considering a food processor and or/by hand.

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

 

 

Lard, by far is the best ingredient for the dough. The crust is quite flaky and rich.

 

Best of luck.

 

I agree - lard is the way to go for this one.

 

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post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by LLoyer View Post
 

You think a mixer wouldn't compromise the flakiness of the dough? I was considering a food processor and or/by hand.


I'm thinking neither for mass quantity. The others are right about lard, and I'm sure for authenticity they elders would have used lard.

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post #12 of 19
I always use lard for Cornish pasties. There's a place in St Mawes, Cornwall that sells pasties made by various women in the village. No two are the same, but all made to a traditional Cornish family recipe.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

We are considering getting a deck oven to cook the pasties. Do you think we'd be better off with a convection oven? We are hoping to par-bake them in large quantities and then cook to order for a fast lunch scene. Does that sound like a reasonable plan? Thanks.

post #14 of 19

All deck ovens are different. Some have plates and some have stones. I think you will have better heat control and consistency with a convection. Recover time should be shorter. With the decks you might be double panning to reduce bottom heat, rotating and things like that. JMHO

PS I'm talking used ovens.

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post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 

We were looking at a deck oven with stones. But you think a convection oven will be easier? We were considering down the road adding pizzas to the menu if we needed to so that's partially why we were considering the deck oven. Would you recommend electric or gas?

post #16 of 19
Won't you get more even heating with a deck oven? Convections seem to run hot & can have crazy hot spots
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 

Grande-that's what I thought!?

post #18 of 19

Well I was thing just about the Pasties. If you're thinking pizza down the road then maybe the deck is better for you. Although the stones can have hot spots also. I prefer gas.$$$

I have both.

I wouldn't be so quick to judge convection/gas. If they are taken care of and cleaned properly and the cooks aren't slamming the doors and things are spaced properly you won't run hot and have

crazy hot spots. I run cookies, puff, etc. with no problem. I also have variable fan speed.

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post #19 of 19
I guess the problems I have stem from trying to fo eight different things in.one big oven! I will say that, with convection, rotating the food is key.
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