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Choosing quality knives - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevpenbanc View Post
The only issue I have with carbon is cutting onions, you can get a reaction and end up with black onions. This may be poor technique by me.
 

 

I was getting same issue with my carbon Moritaka. When cutting onion or something similarly reactive I was getting rust on the food as the knife started to rust immediately. What I do now is that I am wiping the blade with cloth very frequently so I it does not start rusting.

 

As I already asked in some other post:

 

Can any profi chef explain are Aogami/Shirogami knives are really used in profi kitchens? And how (constant wiping?)?

 

I really want to know how this is dealt with by profies.

post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by krx927 View Post
 

Check my answers on similar question in this tread. I am also a home cook which years ago had similar needs/whiches about knives like you. Here is my experience:

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/82315/help-choosing-knife/30#post_484558

 

Besides the knives described there I also have 

Bu-Rei-Zen (Blazen) Gyuto which is comparable to Akifusa but a bit more expensive

and

Yoshikane Hammer Finished Paring Knife. Almost all of my knives are of different style and I like it!

 

A few other important thing about choosing a knife (at least for me):

* the steel must be over 63 HRC otherwise you will sharpen it too much (64HRC or better). Global, Shun and wrustholf and scanpan ARE NOT GOOD ENOUGH! Trust me! Also be aware of other Japanese knives that are not high hardness like VG10 - not good enough, at least for what you want to have - this is to comply with your prerequisite ".I am a home cook and want to invest in some good quality knives that hold their sharpness well "

* for me the easiest way to sharpen the knife is with sharpening system. I have EdgePro Apex and is really good. Previously I had (still with my Wusthofts and Henckels (now only used for crashing bones:)) Gatco sharpening system. These kind of systems are just not good enough, you cannot get same sharpness, they scratch the knives and sharpening lasts to long.

The best option are proper sharpening stones but I am too lazy!

* the shape of handle does not matter much! I have 4 different stiles (classic western, D shape Japanese, Oxtagonal Japanes, special D shape of Miyabi). They all feel good in hand!

* do not rely on buying the knives you want in local shops - they will not have best options and selection. Better buying it online - you can still send them back if you do not like it. The selection is MUCH bigger.

 

Just a little correction here:

 

Most Japanese knives are not hardened to RC 63+, and VG10 in particualr is usually 60-61.  63+ (big difference from 60-61) is in the realm of white #1, blue #1, blue super, some tool steels like SKD-11/D2 and high-tech CPM alloys like S110V, SRS 15 and HAP40.

 

 

Rick

post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by krx927 View Post
 

 

I was getting same issue with my carbon Moritaka. When cutting onion or something similarly reactive I was getting rust on the food as the knife started to rust immediately. What I do now is that I am wiping the blade with cloth very frequently so I it does not start rusting.

 

As I already asked in some other post:

 

Can any profi chef explain are Aogami/Shirogami knives are really used in profi kitchens? And how (constant wiping?)?

 

I really want to know how this is dealt with by profies.

post #34 of 44

Brilliant video. And also the next videos, worth to see.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #35 of 44

I've watched this video recently as I'm somewhat a fan of Jon, and I enjoy making sushi or maki rolls at home.  Sushi rolls don't typically have onion, but the ginger / vinegar solution may pose a threat to the carbon blade?

 

I was surprised to notice that Jon prefers polished blade to patina. Could this be because of what is being cut? (Onions turning black, but are absent from sushi recipes?)

post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweakz View Post

I was surprised to notice that Jon prefers polished blade to patina. Could this be because of what is being cut? (Onions turning black, but are absent from sushi recipes?)

There's a video somewhere where Jon states that Japanese chefs consider a blade with patina to be 'dirty'. It's therefore standard practice to clean the blade each night.
He picked up the habit whilst working in Japan.

Ha ha, I should have watched the video first !
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
 

 

Thanks a lot for this video. Basically I was doing this, with the exception of rinsing the knife under water instead of using the damp cloth... But also important tip at the end: if you will be cutting a lot of highly acidic food perhaps consider using a stainless steel knife ;)

 

Always when I was cooking my gulash and cutting kilos and kilos of onion I was thinking how japanese chefs handle such situations. So take a knife which if good for the job you are doing...

post #38 of 44

Also interesting food culture stuff, a while back someone was saying that in Japan it is the head chef that takes it as his duty to sharpen the knives before the shift, I suppose for the critical cutters anyway.

 

 

Rick

post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevpenbanc View Post


There's a video somewhere where Jon states that Japanese chefs consider a blade with patina to be 'dirty'. It's therefore standard practice to clean the blade each night.
He picked up the habit whilst working in Japan.

Ha ha, I should have watched the video first !


Yes, that's the video I was referring to I believe. Sorry for not making my point clear. I'm curious on how an onion responds to a polished carbon blade vs one with a patina. I understand that onion isn't a common ingredient in sushi which is why patinas may be more popular in the US?  

post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by tweakz View Post
 


Yes, that's the video I was referring to I believe. Sorry for not making my point clear. I'm curious on how an onion responds to a polished carbon blade vs one with a patina. I understand that onion isn't a common ingredient in sushi which is why patinas may be more popular in the US?  

the knife is a bit more reactive, and thus requires a bit more frequent wiping, but i dont find it to be a big deal personally... that being said, i know some would prefer to work with a less reactive blade, and in those cases, a patina might be helpful.  Lastly, keeping the blade looking clean and shiny does require additional work when you finish (i.e. rust erasers, non-bleach powdered cleanser, etc.)

post #41 of 44
Hey , have you heard of the Chicago Cutlery knives? I have heard pretty good things about them.
post #42 of 44

Concerning Chicago Cutlery knives - 

 

At one time, they were made in the United States and considered by the general standards of the day (mid-1980's) to be good quality.

 

Then the company went into bankruptcy and the name was bought.  U.S. production ended.  Production moved overseas.

 

Nowadays, Chicago Cutlery products are made in China and the quality of the knives is pretty much what you can consider as "Made To A Price" quality, with the price extremely low.

 

Don't waste your time or money.  Quality level is about the same or less than the non-serrated-edge Henckels Internationals (the "One-Figure", lower-end Henckels branded knives).

 

Save your money and buy a much better chef's knife from a different and better recommended brand discussed on this forum.

 

 

 

Galley Swiller


Edited by Galley Swiller - 10/14/14 at 2:22pm
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

Also interesting food culture stuff, a while back someone was saying that in Japan it is the head chef that takes it as his duty to sharpen the knives before the shift, I suppose for the critical cutters anyway.

 

 

Rick

 

Especially for carbon steel knives, Japanese chefs will sharpen their knives at the end of their shift.  That way, the new surfaces will have a chance to oxidize with exposure to air and form a micro-patina before the knives are used again.

 

If the food or the knife steel are particularly reactive, it would not be unheard of for a chef to have more than one set of knives, and rotate use.  That gives extra time for the sharpened edges to oxidize.

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #44 of 44

Eh just goes to show you can't trust everything you hear on CT, or at least my memory of it.

 

 

Rick

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