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Plate warming solutions

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quick questions,

I am wondering about portable, off site, solutions for plate warming. Lets assume that I do not access to an oven. What kind of methods to you use?

Thanks in advance!

Al
post #2 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quick questions,

I am wondering about portable, off site, solutions for plate warming. Lets assume that I do not access to an oven. What kind of methods to you use?

Thanks in advance!

Al
post #3 of 20

Heat lamps work--how many plates are you talking about?

post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hi Mike,

Usualy tops out around twenty at a time. Have you worked with heatlamps that can plug into a household outlet? If so, are they gutsy enough to do the work?
post #5 of 20

Heat lamp will not work for 20 plates. Will take a whole day.

 

Easiest if you have access to a microwave.

 

Wet some small kitchen towels, put one in between two plates, stack the plates. Paper towels if you don't have kitchen towels.

 

It will not take long to have all 20 plates very hot, boiling hot, depending on your microwave power.

 

 

dcarch

post #6 of 20
Plug in or sterno hot boxes, but depending on how many plates you need that could run into a transport nightmere. Access to a clean dishwasher? My dishes come out of the machines at 90c so they are nice and hot.
post #7 of 20
Heat lamp. Chaffing dishes . Cambro with heating insert( haven't tried yet) am planning on buying though. Hot box was mentioned they are great.
post #8 of 20

For twenty plates, I would probably warm them at work and transport in a pre-warmed ice chests.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #9 of 20

Forgot to mention:

 

While my method works great for warming from 1 to as many plates as your microwave oven's size will allow, do be careful not to microwave plates with fancy metalic designs.

 

The microwave can quickly burn away those designs.

 

dcarch

post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
@Cheflayne, I like that, straight up and elegant solution.

@dcarch Another good idea, but I cant count on access to a microwave. I actually have one that is transportable...I may explore this.

My biggest issue is during plate up. The current location of my pop-up has a decent pantry that is very functional, except its airconditioned. And not in its own zone that can be shut down.

Also, Cheflayne, it looks like I double posted this question, any chance you can work a little Mod magic and merge them?

Thanks guys,

Al
post #11 of 20
Thread Starter 
@Lagom, that was what I was counting on. I am currently working out of an airconditioned space. Even fresh out of the washer (location is a wine wholesaler, so they have a high heat washer for stem ware) but by the time plates are laid out and wiped, chill is setting in.

I might have to use cheaper plates, heavy ceramic that holds heat better than my china.

I am costing out cambro cabinets right now. Used them in past, obviously a good product. Bulk is the down side there, but at least they can act as an extra work surface.

Al
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post

Heat lamp will not work for 20 plates. Will take a whole day.

Easiest if you have access to a microwave.

Wet some small kitchen towels, put one in between two plates, stack the plates. Paper towels if you don't have kitchen towels.

It will not take long to have all 20 plates very hot, boiling hot, depending on your microwave power.


dcarch

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanMcPherson View Post

Hi Mike,

Usualy tops out around twenty at a time. Have you worked with heatlamps that can plug into a household outlet? If so, are they gutsy enough to do the work?

Some heat lamps can plug into a regular outlet, make sure it's on a lot if amps or it will probably blow or it's own circuit. Can get 600-1000 watt 3' lamps that are portable. These are good for heating a pass also. I'll check the brand later and post it. You could put a lot of plates under it.
post #13 of 20

The reason why I think a heat lamp may not work well is because heat lamp heats with infrared radiation, just like the sun. Under the sun, anything in the shadow will not be heated. Also, anything that is highly reflective (white) cannot be heated efficiently.

 

If you have to warm many plates regularly, you may want to look into this:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Waterbridge-Electric-Plate-Warmer-Heritage/dp/B007LR5I7K/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1408982652&sr=8-11&keywords=plate+warmer

 

dcarch

post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post

The reason why I think a heat lamp may not work well is because heat lamp heats with infrared radiation, just like the sun. Under the sun, anything in the shadow will not be heated. Also, anything that is highly reflective (white) cannot be heated efficiently.



 



If you have to warm many plates regularly, you may want to look into this:



 



http://www.amazon.com/Waterbridge-Electric-Plate-Warmer-Heritage/dp/B007LR5I7K/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1408982652&sr=8-11&keywords=plate+warmer



 



dcarch



That warming blanket thing looks pretty good! Never see it before but for under 100$ and very portable looks like a great option.

Plate would sure heat under the sun where I'm sitting right now! It's a scorcher!
Don't really see what that has to do with a heat lamp in the shade though lol.

I went in to my kitchen but forgot to look at the lamps I cannot remember the make of it....

Here is something similar I googled. They are 300$ up for a decent one .



Can hold the plates and then serve food under it as well.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post


Don't really see what that has to do with a heat lamp in the shade though lol.

Can hold the plates and then serve food under it as well.

 

A heat lamp can only heat up the top surface, that's why it can heat up food and a single plate. it is the nature of infrared radiation.

 

Simple test with three plate under the sun:

 

A white one, and two black ones.

 

The white plate will take much longer to get heated up by the sun than the black one.

 

Now put the other black one in shade. It will never get hot. Many plates will be in shade if you have 20 plates to warm in stacks.

 

 

dcarch

post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post

A heat lamp can only heat up the top surface, that's why it can heat up food and a single plate.


dcarch

It is a good explanation you put forth on nature of infrared, but I think this product works quite well because I use it everyday and I feel the plates with my hands. They get hot, especially nearer the element obviously. These things have a 1000w heater. You can get them in bigger versions as well or smaller.
Just an option.

Thanks for the clear depiction of the plate test, it is interesting I suppose but why a black plate in the shade not getting hot outside? It will IMO get whatever the ambient temp of shade is.

A black plate under that 1000 watt lamp even under 3 or 4 or 15 plates is still going to get warm, because the air temp around it is going to be warm. The top ones will be un handle able if too close; keep them at least 6" away from lamp. A lot of kitchens use the in the pass or window or w.e you call the main hot line, I'm sure many of you keep your plates there.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post


It is a good explanation you put forth on nature of infrared, but I think this product works quite well because I use it everyday and I feel the plates with my hands. They get hot, especially nearer the element obviously. These things have a 1000w heater. You can get them in bigger versions as well or smaller.
Just an option.
Actually you and I agree on everything.
Physics is interesting, because laws of physics only work if the conditions are exactly defined. In the situation which you stated, and I understand restaurant do use the heat lamp to warm food and plates. I would assume the plate that gets used would be the top two or three plates which can be heated by the lamp and thru conductivity of the ceramic plates, but the bottom ones may not be as hot as the top few. The bottom ones will be as hot as the ambient temperature by conductivety of air temperature, and not much hotter.

Thanks for the clear depiction of the plate test, it is interesting I suppose but why a black plate in the shade not getting hot outside? It will IMO get whatever the ambient temp of shade is.
That is the situation I am trying to explain, the plate in shade cannot get hotter then ambient temperature, regardless how hot the sun is. Astronauts must stay in shade or use reflective material in space, or they will be fried by the sun in a short time.

A black plate under that 1000 watt lamp even under 3 or 4 or 15 plates is still going to get warm, because the air temp around it is going to be warm. The top ones will be un handle able if too close; keep them at least 6" away from lamp. A lot of kitchens use the in the pass or window or w.e you call the main hot line, I'm sure many of you keep your plates there.
Another way to make many plates uniformly hot (the same temperature hot, not just the top ones) is to dump boiling water over the plates. The plates will be dry very quickly because they are very hot. Water carries 3,400 times more BTUs than air. I am not sure the OP has the luxury of time to wait for the heat lemp to heat up the ambient temperature and the low condutivity of ceramics to heat up the bottom plates from edge to the center of the plates.
dcarch
 

Edited by dcarch - 8/25/14 at 1:02pm
post #18 of 20
The bottom plates will warm through because whatever they are sitting on will get hit from the lamp as well i.e the stainless in the restaurant or the table in the catering tent. Best case scenario with the lamp is to remember to rotate the plates as they warm up.

Boil the plates then out them under the lamp to dry off!!!! smile.gif
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the tips everybody. Some good solutions there. Wish there was an under surface unit, like a table cloth sized heating pad!
post #20 of 20

Come to think of it, another inexpensive way:

 

Go to a Home Depot building supply store and get a sheet of 1" thick rigid foam insulation.

 

You can easily cut with a knife to make a box big enough for your plates. Use packing tape to construct the box. It will be plenty strong.

 

Heat up your plates in you oven and store the hot plates in the foam insulated box.

 

The plates will be very hot for the whole day.

 

Afterwards, you can disassemble the foam boards and store them away for the next time.

 

I had done this sometime ago. I had to keep a hot block of Himalayan salt block hot and transport it to a dinner. It was kept hot all day.

 

dcarch

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