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confit ghost peppers vs charring/roasting vs vinegar solution, etc.

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hello friends,

 

I did already search the forums for topics regarding ghost peppers, but i found little relative to how i plan to handle the pepper.

 

So.. I have a ghost pepper plant, and was trying to determine if there were a superior method of infusing it, or if it were simply a matter of preference.

 

I was considering:

 

1. Making a ghost pepper confit, and reserving the pepper in the oil and allowing it to rest and intensify.

 

2. Charring the pepper first, removing carbon, and following the same latter execution. 

 

3. Doing either (confit or pepper) and letting rest and intensify in a vinegar solution in the direction of a hot sauce. 

 

I'm generally avoiding extensive processing using chemical compounds and the like; I just want to be sure I preserve the pepper and its essence in a capacity not inedible. 

 

Does anyone have any thoughts on the best preservative processes in handling ghost peppers? I'm used to handling them in kitchens wherein the product has an understandably limited shelf life. In this scenario, I'm looking for flavor-priorative AND time-lasting processes.

 

What do you think, kitchen friends? How do you like to process your ghost peppers? Is a confit adequate? Should the pepper be removed thereafter to keep from, y'know, making you violently ill?

 

Thoughts?

post #2 of 8

Storing in oil is risky. Keep it refrigerated and use it fast. Vinegar has a pH to keep it safe, and is a traditional treatment. 

 

Otherwise, I'd just dry it. Keeps well, versatile to use, even to make a chili oil then. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

i wasn't sure if using the confit method would be enough to preserve it, which is why i asked; thank you for your insight. it looks like a hot sauce would be the most utilitarian. i was trying to find another method of preservation, but safety above all else.

post #4 of 8

Have you considered drying them and creating a powder? You could even roast them first if you want to introduce that smokey element to the end product.

post #5 of 8

Salting works very, very well - I still have some salted bird's eyes from last year in the fridge. Still hot and full of flavour.

post #6 of 8

GeneMachine,

What exactly are birds eye. Out at the property the older farmer next land over takes care of feeding our tanks. He must grow quite a bit of birds eye. He has always offered it but I have never had them until last year. He takes the whole plant and gives it a roast over the fire, then stuffs it into the cavity of a catfish, wraps the fish in chick. wire and cooks. OH MY!!! It was great but I didn't realize it was a pepper! LOL

I don't seem to be able to eat the really hot peppers, Ghost,Jalapeno etc. But I enjoy hot Italian peppers, go figure.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #7 of 8

@panini It's an Asian variety, mostly used in Thai or Vietnamese cooking.

post #8 of 8
Hah it translates literally as mouse shit pepper smile.gif Bird's eye is a westernized nomenclature.
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