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Mushy French Fries - Page 2

post #31 of 50

I just re-read his post.  It looks like he is doing 1/4"x1/4" dice.  If that were the case then I'd just straight toss them in the frier.

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post #32 of 50
Yes the type of potato you get and it's starch/sugar content can very because of region.... and I think 400° is too hot on a deep fryer, you'll kill your oil in a day or two. That will make your food greasy.
post #33 of 50

Some say the Belgium are the master's of fries and possibly they are:

 

see this link for Belgium fries (double fried).

 

I have to add my two cents. Blanching is to prevent discoloration and it should be brief. The potatoes should be thoroughly dry before your first frying. Fries need quick cooking and this limits their cross-section. Yukon Gold will give good results and they are a little stronger. The best oil will yield the best tasting fries. Adding peanut oil to olive will will increase the mixtures heat resistance while the olive oil helps with flavor. Crisp on the outside but tender on the inside is good criteria. Mushy is not a word that describes fries PERIOD.

 

Keep the batches small enough that the oil temperature does not apprecially droop. Keep oil temperature no higher than 375 F.

post #34 of 50
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot for the detailed recipe! @oldschool1982 . I'm trying this today and will let you know how it turns out to be. 

 

Since almost all my recipes so far have involved double frying i think i need to focus on how well i de-grease my potatoes (get rid of the oil after the first try). Are there any tips if you're doing it on a large scale?

post #35 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post

I do about 50 lbs a day, cut, soak, rinse, drain, initial fry approx 8 min @ 325 soft no color just starting to firm, cool and fry to order @ 350-375

 

How do you cool after the first fry? Can you freeze with this method after the first fry? 

Also, how long do you initially soak the fries in the first step?

post #36 of 50
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot for the detailed recipe! @oldschool1982 . I'm trying this today and will let you know how it turns out to be. 

post #37 of 50

I'm a Belgian and we are known world-wide for our fries. Some time ago I posted how we make them here;

 

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/66217/in-search-of-the-perfect-french-fry#post_354015

 

This is what I posted then;

 

- Choise of potatoes. This is imperative to make good frites. Look for potatoes with very little sugar in them! If they contain too much sugar, your frites will look darkbrown instead of golden as they should look, and they will be soggy and bwaaah, no dought...

 

- Choise of fat; best frites are still made in oxwhite (beef suet). They taste incredible. A more modern way is to use a good quality oil. I use a storebought combinationfat that contains mostly sunflower. Don't use the same fat for dozens of times! Always take small dark bits of frites out of the oil or it will turn the next batches somewhat bitter. I always sieve the oil after cooled.

 

- Cut your frites by hand in square sticks at 8-12 mm. The unequal sizes of handcut frites gives a lot of different textures which contributes to a better mouthfeel...

 

-  Just wash quickly but do NOT soak them! Dry the rinsed frites in a clean kitchentowel!!!! If not, the water will get under the oil and your fat may run over the fryer edge!

 

- Fry just a little frites at a time; 2 big handfuls is more than enough! I fill a very common deep plate to measure one batch, not too much heaped. That's also enough for 2 people.

 

- First, poach in oil at 150°C. Don't let the frites get a color. You can hear the changing of the frying sound when they are ready. Lift the basket up, take a frite between index and thumb and squeeze. When they're more or less easy to squeeze through, they're done for the first time. This poaching can take up to 8 minutes or longer. Exact timing is nonsense, just do the squeeze test a few times to be sure.

 

- Leave the frites to cool entirely; spread them on a large (oven)tray, they will cool very quickly. Time to make mayo, a must with frites.

 

- Raise temperature to 180°C. Again don't overcrowd the fryer! Fry the frites in just a minute or so until golden, NOT brown. Again, you can simply hear from the changing of frying sound of the frites when they are ready.

 

Enjoy, and, greetings from the frites country par excellence!

 

One last remark; make your own frozen frites portions. After poaching for the first time and cooling, portion and bag them and put in your freezer. Ready to use and 1000 times better than that commercial junk.

post #38 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post
 

I'm a Belgian and we are known world-wide for our fries. Some time ago I posted how we make them here;

 

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/66217/in-search-of-the-perfect-french-fry#post_354015

 

This is what I posted then;

 

- Choise of potatoes. This is imperative to make good frites. Look for potatoes with very little sugar in them! If they contain too much sugar, your frites will look darkbrown instead of golden as they should look, and they will be soggy and bwaaah, no dought...

Thanks for the help. With regards to the choice of Potatoes - can the choice of the potato eventually cause greasiness in the fries? And how do i determine the sugar content? And what other chemical factors should i consider? Pectin levels? Water content of potatoes etc etc?

post #39 of 50

In Belgium, all supermarkets sell specific potatoes for making fries. They are the right variety and the right size potatoes. Most of these potatoes are the variety "Bintje". They can be found in many European countries. From what I read here on this forum, in the US, the best alternative seems to be the "Yukon" variety. I would stick to those if they are proven to deliver the best result. Why re-invent the wheel (which doesn't mean you cannot experiment with other types of potatoes)?

 

Greasy fries are mostly the result of too low temperature when frying for the second time. On the other hand, when you use potatoes with a high sugar content, your fries will get brown very quickly but they will never get crispy and... they will give the impression of being very greasy.

 

Here's the difference between low sugar content fries and the right kind;

 

Steak frites, Belgium's national dish Fries with higher sugar content; too brown, not crisp enough

 

Moules frites  Perfect crisp golden fries as they should be


Edited by ChrisBelgium - 9/9/14 at 2:09am
post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxi View Post
 

Thanks a lot for the detailed recipe! @oldschool1982 . I'm trying this today and will let you know how it turns out to be. 

 

Since almost all my recipes so far have involved double frying i think i need to focus on how well i de-grease my potatoes (get rid of the oil after the first try). Are there any tips if you're doing it on a large scale?


You need to let the baskets hang for a few minutes to drain after pulling from the oil, then give them a good shake before dumping. Your fries should not be greasy at this point.

post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxi View Post
 

 

How do you cool after the first fry? Can you freeze with this method after the first fry? 

Also, how long do you initially soak the fries in the first step?


I dump out onto a sheet pan until cool, then store in a buss tub or 6" hotel pan in the cooler.

Why would you freeze?

30 min soak, agitate well, rinse, into a colander to drain before loading into the fryer baskets.

I also rinse with warm water, fries dry faster.

post #42 of 50
Thread Starter 

Thank you so much for all the tips guys. It's all down to the potato. I tried fries from two places, reputedly serving the best fresh fries in the city and well .. they were way worse then McCains frozen fries. So i've given up on perfecting the fry till i'm able to source quality potatoes from a local source. Thank you all for your help! 

post #43 of 50

Starting potatoes in water is a great way to cook them. You can get a fantastic roast potato by boiling the spud first then finishing them off in the oven. It doesn't surprise me that the golden arches blanche their fries first before the final cook.

post #44 of 50

I prefer to crinkle cut my fries at home. Don't know what it is, but love them like that.

 

ChefBubba does them just as we did at pretty much all the restaurants I worked in over years past. Twice fry after cold water and drying is the best method imho.

post #45 of 50

At my workplace we hand cut the fries, rinse em in a huge sink, then throw it into tubs and fill with water before throwing them in the walk-in.

We "blanch" them first at 300 degrees for 7 minutes. Oil temps drop to ~240 initially after dropping the fries but it hasnt really mattered. Put the fries on sheet trays and cool them in the walk-in before they get portioned.

For service, we fry them at 350 degrees for a little over a minute. Comes out better than McD's fries IMO

post #46 of 50
Have you guys ever tried frying fries with vegetable shortening or lard?
When i make fries i always fried them in shortening or lard, they come out very crunchy and crispy,

Try it
post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxi View Post
 

Thanks a lot for the detailed recipe! @oldschool1982 . I'm trying this today and will let you know how it turns out to be. 

Lost track of this topic....I also didn't get an email when you highlighted my username......sorry and I'm glad I might have helped? How did they turn out? I also saw you asked about grease? I never realized a problem since the baskets were allowed to drain for a few minutes before they were dumped. I did like @chefbuba mentioned....rest, shake well sand dump. You might need a couple extra sets to do this.

 

I see you've put things off over the type of potato you have access to?  Did you try requesting a cured utility from your purveyor. Even a cured Idaho Russet 80ct or 60ct would work but the cost is different because your paying for the sizing. The next thing you could try is start inspecting them and refuse the shipment.....any green goes back, The company should do right by you. Otherwise, order them 3 weeks out and store them on a dunnage rack in dry storage. Heck, 5 Guy's here keeps 20 cases rotating through the dining room. Granted that's not for everyone but you can use it as a quality statement if you have that type of operation. 

 

Utility potatoes are Idaho russets, just not the textbook potato shape which is what someone would expect out of a baking potato. Since you're cutting the utility, the odd shaped appearance doesn't affect things other than the smaller pieces that crisp up really nice.

 

@ChrisBelgium was absolutely correct about sugar and why I suggested a cured potato. Her suggestion of a Yukon's might be a good substitute.....never tried them but also never had an issue getting or curing my own potatoes The Beef suet or talo was available from Sysco and is a blend of Cottonseed and talo.The product really does make a difference in fries and chips so check with them to see if you can still order it.

 

Good luck and hope this helps.

post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post
 


I use a mandolin, wide open.

 

 

...WOW...really?!?! and you do 50lbs a day? I'm surprised you don't have a dedicated french fry cutter. Heck, I bought one for home I like them so much.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxi View Post
 

 

How do you cool after the first fry? Can you freeze with this method after the first fry? 

Also, how long do you initially soak the fries in the first step?

 

Yeah you can chill and freeze after the initial blanch if you want to make your own frozen fries. Some people prefer that method and say it produces a better french fry.

To each their own. I freeze at home, we don't at work.

Apprentichef - Six stitches to go home early and you can't die until your shift is over.

 

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Apprentichef - Six stitches to go home early and you can't die until your shift is over.

 

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post #49 of 50
I have one, still new in the box, found out after the fact that there was nowhere to mount it.
(I'm in a trailer) Doesn't take long with the mandolin.
post #50 of 50


Simplot changed the whole fry industry, there first blanch  is done with steam then chill,   then fry  saves a lot of oil  Many fries today are not cut from potatoes they are potato scraps chopped and formed into fries.  (no waste))

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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