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Sugar and humidity help

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi I am new to these forums and have ready many good posts already thanx for reading mine. I have made and pulled sugar for a while now I'm starting to get into some casting and blown sugar. This summer has been very wet and the humidity has been high, which is unusual for my area. I've tried different recipes ( all using isomalt and korn syrup ) all with fairly low water content. I've also read on some methods of cooking it on lower temps for longer so that the water has more of a chance to evaporate. Including using different and calibrated thermometers. But the issue at hand is that my end product becomes sticky after it cools even under a constant fan. It does finally dry out but it will also become dull and the base or the bottom of the product looks tacky because it was stuck to parchment/silk pad. Most of what I've done recently are ribbons and casting colorless sugar in tubing for a nice elament to some pieces. But after drying the are not clear anymore. Tacky. I am also new to casting in tubing so any helpfull tips would go a long way. Been having trouble with the isomalt either too hot and creating bubbles inside the tube or not hot enough and the length suffering from cooling too early.
post #2 of 15
I work in a dry climate, too. But we did get humidity for a few weeks and it wreaks havoc with my sugar decor. My best solution was to use a dehumidifier in a closed room overnight. Then, in the morning to my sugar work and pack well with desiccant. Even then, it doesn't last long.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thank you jelly I hadn't even thought about a dehumidifier. May presnt a bit of a better way for me except I work in a fairly large open kitchen so only place to put one and be efective would be a fairly small room that's by the kitchen. I'll give that a shot though.

Thanx
post #4 of 15


No new recipe will work. I would suggest  an air conditioned room for making and storing'

When displaying try a glass cabinet wit a dummy bottom filled with powdered chemical l lyme which will help absorb moisture

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 15

@TheSeeker,

Hi,

Lots of questions.:eek:

Are you mixing the isomalt? Glucose is helpful in some formulas. Do you have a sugar box type set up with lamps. Are you boiling cooling and then reheating? Are you using your hands?

quite expensive but really helpful in pouring and casting.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Chefedb I'll look into a glass cabinet for displaying that's not a bad idea but Probly will go lower on the list of things to purchase for a bit anyway.

Panini

I am mixing my Isomalt,Karo and and water but just untill the mixture becomes clear. I will try glucose next. I don't have a sugar box yet it is on my list of things to purchase. Just heat lamps for holding so far. As far as boiling cooling reheating yes that is what I've done. I also have a sauce gun but I hadn't thought to use it because the casting I was trying to accomplish was in fairly small tubing 1/4" to 1/8". I think I'm going to get some bigger tubing might help me start out then back to the small stuff.
post #7 of 15

@TheSeeker,

I'm curious why your not using straight isomalt? Unless you décor is getting eaten it might be easier for you.

Working with your bare hands will dull the finish.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
I was tought always to use a small amount of water to help in the initial dissolving process and karyo for an acid element in the isomalt. And I do use gloves so that it helps not gunk up the sugar.
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Panini do you cook your isomalt almost like you would a dry caramel? Nothing els with it.
post #10 of 15

Yes, I add water to mush. Once the bottom starts to melt I reduce the flame a little and stir. This will eliminate your bubbles if your tubing or casting.

The next time I boil I will send you the weights of isomalt to h2o.

PS I use powdered colors to reduce alcohol and water.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Another great tip powder colors. Thanx is there a good place to get those?
post #12 of 15

I use ChefRubber sometimes out of Vegas

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
I've looked at and used ChefRubber for a few things I'll look at their colors right now. I've been thinking about actually making a trip there since I'm only a few hrs away. Almost the same cost of shipping. 😉
post #14 of 15

@TheSeeker

Well if you're that close, put it all on red:D

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #15 of 15

the guys I see doing it use nothing but isomalt period. Pictures below were taken 2 weeks ago in Costa Mesa CA and humidity was in the 70% range that day.

 

you do need good lamps, you should always be using gloves, the gloves I see them using are these really cool looking fingertip reinforced rubber gloves out of Japan somewhere, wish I had a name or knew how to get them - just basic dishwashing gloves from japan tho. If you look carefully in top photo, there's a pack of them sitting on the table next to chef...

 

 

 

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