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Greek chicken "Avogano"?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

To my ex-vegetarian wife, chicken became a gateway meat, and she's had so much of it that now she prefers beef or even lamb! So we haven't had chicken in a while....

 

Me: - so do you no longer want me to cook chicken at all?

Her: - well not really ... unless.... I would really like you to make chicken Av.. Av... Avogano?

Me: - what? Do you mean Afgo... Avga... Avgolemono? 

Her: - Yes, Avogalomno. 

Me: - I think it's Avgolemono... not sure though... Isn't that more of a winter dish?

Her: - Do they even have winters in Greece? 

Me: - You may have a point.... let me ask the forum!!

 

Well I've never made it, no idea where to start, so.... I'll ask the forum!

 

So here I am, asking, and probably hoping to hear from @Koukouvagia and/or @Nicko ? How do you make a mean chicken Avgolemono?

 

Thanks! :) 

post #2 of 7

That was one of the dishes that @phatch posted in the egg challenge, and one reason he was a top contender. Perhaps he'll share his technique.

 

mjb.

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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #3 of 7

Avgolemono is a soup. Or a thickish sauce sometimes thought to be a precursor to mayonnaise.

 

We had a recent thread on the soup, my post includes a link to the basic recipe I use, though I add carrots and use orzo instead of rice.

 http://www.cheftalk.com/t/21038/avgolemono#post_468910

 

As to the sauce, I've only made it once long ago. This might be a place to start with the sauce but hopefully Koukouvagia or Nicko will be along soon to give better advice. 

 

http://www.mygreekdish.com/cooking-tips-and-advice/the-perfect-egg-lemon-sauce-three-easy-recipes-avgolemono/

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 7
Yea avgolemono is really yummy. Have you ever eaten it French Fries?

Phatch's article is pretty good though skip the version with cornstarch!

It couldn't be simpler. Start with your favorite chicken broth, hot and steamy. I use the ratio of 1 egg + 1 lemon per quart. You may add more/less lemon depending how potent your lemons are.

It's all technique, very easy for an experienced cook like yourself. Room temp eggs and lemons. Whisk the egg in a sturdy bowl near your stock pot. I put a wet tea towel under it to keep it from slipping because you'll need both hands to make this thing and can't hold on to the bowl. Then wisk in the lemon juice. Then slowly drizzle in stock as you continue to whisk. Keep adding stock until the sauce is tempered, same temp as the stock in the pot. Then stir it all back into the pot through a sieve if you wish.

Small pasta makes the broth creamier, richer and doesn't allow the sauce to break. Rice doesn't do as good of a job but it is used often.

Important - avgolemono should not be cooked anymore, all this is done once you've turned off your burner. I tend to make the avgolemono after I've cooked the pasta in the broth.

What happens next is up to you serve as is or add bitsof chicken, cooked veg, herbs etc.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thank you guys, really helpful. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Yea avgolemono is really yummy. Have you ever eaten it French Fries?

We have never had it. I think my wife met a Greek chef the other day at the park and he mentioned it, she's been talking about it ever since. It does sound quite good. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Then stir it all back into the pot through a sieve if you wish.

Small pasta makes the broth creamier, richer and doesn't allow the sauce to break. Rice doesn't do as good of a job but it is used often.

Important - avgolemono should not be cooked anymore, all this is done once you've turned off your burner. I tend to make the avgolemono after I've cooked the pasta in the broth.
 

So... at what point do you turn off the burner exactly? Before stirring it all back into the pot or after? Most recipes I've seen suggest to bring the mix back to almost boiling point, is that what you do? 

 

And if you make the avgolemono after you add the pasta.. does that mean you whisk the egg/lemon mix with the broth/pasta mix? Does that not damage the pasta? Whisking it? 

 

Finally, is there a difference between the soup and the sauce? Or is it just the way you use it? I'm not so interested in making a soup, I'm more interested in serving some chicken with a thick sauce... if that is even doable? 

 

Thanks again!

post #6 of 7
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Thank you guys, really helpful. 

 

We have never had it. I think my wife met a Greek chef the other day at the park and he mentioned it, she's been talking about it ever since. It does sound quite good. 

 

 

So... at what point do you turn off the burner exactly? Before stirring it all back into the pot or after? Most recipes I've seen suggest to bring the mix back to almost boiling point, is that what you do? 

 

And if you make the avgolemono after you add the pasta.. does that mean you whisk the egg/lemon mix with the broth/pasta mix? Does that not damage the pasta? Whisking it? 

 

Finally, is there a difference between the soup and the sauce? Or is it just the way you use it? I'm not so interested in making a soup, I'm more interested in serving some chicken with a thick sauce... if that is even doable? 

 

Thanks again!

 

I add pasta to the broth and cook it until it's done.  Then I turn off the burner and begin making the avgolemono.  When I temper the broth I'm careful not to pick up pasta with it, I just skim broth from the top.  A little pasta does get mixed in which is fine, the pasta is orzo or pastina, very small.  It does not get damaged in the whisking.  I never bring avgolemono back to a boil, ever.  I treat it like a custard, you never want to boil a custard.

 

There's no difference between the soup and the sauce, the soup is just much more.  The sauce however will not be thick, not unless you add the cornstarch or some other type of thickener.  Traditionally avgolemono is a runny sauce.  It is served on dolmades, fricasee stews, etc.  If you want to serve it with chicken I would suggest making a chicken stew with broth.  I would thicken the sauce with roux right from the start and then make the avgolemono.  Avgolemono is always the last step.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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