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Best stock for my veloute sauce

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone

 

Well, I tried to make a veloute sauce for the very first time with my homemade stock. My stock was made with chicken feet as  I read that it is a strong source of flavor and collagen. I cooked my stock for more than 4 on low heat and I wasn't precisely satisfied with the result: It had a nice consistency once it was cold, almost solid, but the flavor wasn't there, It was almost flavorless. I didn't use a lot of water but I did use a lot of chicken feet (2 pounds). My question is: should I use chicken backs and wings instead of chicken feet? Thanks in advance :)

post #2 of 10

What else was in the stock along with the feet?  Celery, carrots, onion, etc? Backs & wings will make a good stock also.

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

those 3 basically: celery, carrots  and onions; I'm still wondering what did I do wrong :(

post #4 of 10

Salt can do wonders for flavor in a stock

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply
post #5 of 10

And herbs.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #6 of 10

Is it possible to departure from the classics and make a veloute with brown chicken stock? Fond brun de volaille. Certainly more tasty.

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #7 of 10

I've never produced a stock with only one by-product from the animal except maybe my beef stock. For that I don't like the collagen in the stock and try to use only femurs with no knuckles. The amount of time your cooking, 4 hours is good but I'll sometimes go as long as 6.

 

That said......try and locate some backs and necks. Unfortunately in our area, there aren't too many grocery stores (if any) that break down their own poultry these days. However, you could probably find a small butcher shop.

 

As far as cost, if it's a local grocery and they don't already have them packaged, they will probably give you the parts or sell them at a greatly reduced price. The butcher shop probably won't give them away but should sell them at a fair market value. Mostly because this represents part of their cost of goods purchased.  Anyhow, from the sound of things, you're looking for that gelatin like consistency when cooled and the necks for sure will contribute with that. Roasting the parts also helps with flavor. Although this is not classic, it's not unacceptable either. The best way is to coat everything with a little oil, including the vegetables mentioned and roast in a high heat oven. The stock will have a darker complexion because of the color applied to the base products but it does enhance flavor  a great deal.

 

Just remember don't create a vigorous boil in any situation when steeping the bones. There should be just a slight bubble in the pot. If it's boiled, your stock will be cloudy. Herbs, as mentioned will help but if you don't put them in a sachet or bind tgem with twine, they can fall apart. You'll definitely need to strain it but if you want a clean stock, herbs or not, remember to strain your stock through some cheese cloth at the end. Make certain you soak the cloth in water and wring it out. This will keep it from absorbing too much stock.

post #8 of 10

I can remember back in culinary school years and years ago. I arrived at a demo late and the instructor was making a chicken Veolute.

He told me if I didn't need the demo, go ahead anf hit the production kitchen and make one.

I thought back on my Grandmother who I helped forever in the restaurant. I deboned a few birds, gave them a scorch, added mirepoix, h2o.

Simmered for 3-4 hr? Strained it through a wet moppine. The class chose mine over the chefs, haha

I agree with @oldschool1982 you need the bones and neck.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #9 of 10

I've never used chicken feet for my stock but I always heard they were used more for collagen than for flavor. Wings and back will give you more flavor, and ultimately if you want more of a meaty flavor, put meat in there (for example whole thighs). 

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 

thanks everyone, I think I'll try it again next week and I'll let you know if I fail with my veloute sauce, hope I won't lol

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