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Beef tendon

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I must be living under a rock because over the weekend I had my first taste of beef tendon.  The guy at a local pho restaurant suggested it, but he warned that many people seem afraid of it.  What a wonderful taste sensation.  Pure gelatinous yumminess.

 

Aside pho, what other beef tendon uses are there?  Any recipes to share?

post #2 of 7

It shows up on cold plate appetizers in Chinese cuisine. I've bought it pre-cooked and seasoned at one local Asian grocer. Never cooked it myself. But I too love it in pho.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 7

My wife used to cook beef tendons a lot. Its indeed a delicacy if well done. All recipes i know begin with blanching and slow cooking them. On open fire, it will take 3-4 hours. to get them tender. Then you proceed to put the flavors you want cause beef tendons are not so much tastefull; they have that nice texture that will absorb all flavors you put in them.

Here's a recipe that skips two steps: blanch the tendons and braise until tender.

 

 

Here's a surprising soup:

 

 

And a tendons kind of curry :

 

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #4 of 7

Karen will be spending a week with her family, leaving wednesday. Maybe I'll experiment with tendon while she is gone.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #5 of 7

I like braised versions of beef tendons. Spicy is always good.

 

I also like the beef balls with tendons mixed in.

post #6 of 7

@BrianShaw you are not living under a rock, I have never tried beef tendon either. I will have to try this the next time I am in China town.

Thanks,

Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #7 of 7

I can get tendons pretty regularly at a local Asian grocery.  I  will add a few to the veal stock pot, fantastic for gelatin.  

 

Not the best pic, but on the bottom right is my fav use for tendon.  Once braised a good long time (or pulled from the stock pot), trim the tendon very well of any gristle and meat.  Cool, and slice into small pieces.  Pop these into a dehydrator over night until rock hard and "gem like" (kinda resembles a broken beer bottle).  Pop into a fryer and you have beef puffs.  

 

Al

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