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So, What are You Fermenting??? - Page 4

post #91 of 115

Could setup a dorm sized fridge on a PID controller to use as a fermentation chamber in warmer climates.

post #92 of 115

In the epic fail department, this harvest season has certainly been one for me. As much as I hate to admit, I should have known better.

     Rather than get my supplies out and the kitchen ready first, I headed straight to the orchard. Then while attempting to find time to organize and set up the process of canning and pickling, all the fruit ripened and then spoiled. The sauerkraut is turning out more sour than kraut, the pears were mostly eaten by hand, the rest spoiling before the canning process could get started and the lovely cucumbers developed mold before I could get the pickling under way. 

     For all that, I'm still optimistic that I'll get the kitchen ready before the absolute end of the season in time to pickle, can or ferment something.  

Lesson learned- never under estimate the power of mise en place. 

post #93 of 115

I love the smell of fermenting Rye sourdough culture.

post #94 of 115

Hey @SandSquid,

How are you doing. I just wanted to pass along some info cuz your starting out. I would wear gloves every time use use Rye flour. I don't know what it is about it, but I know numerous bakers that after handling a lot of Rye flour the are very allergic to it including myself, Rashes, itching, etc. It is also a big cause in Bakers Asthma. Just sayin

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post #95 of 115
Thread Starter 

So just tasted the Kohlrabi "Sauerkraut" that my wife started just over 3 weeks ago, and dang it is good.  Will give it a few more weeks to get a bit more sour, but loving it.  In fact, today I made Sauerkraut Soup using that.

post #96 of 115

@Pete

A bit belated thank you for the extra details about making sour pickles, esp what to look out for.

And of course to all other posters. I would not even have considered making tem without this thread.

 

Other thna that I can relate very much to @chefwriter as I was intending to do cucumber sour pickles for the first time and somehow there were not enough hours in a day and my cucumbers will end up on the compost heap......

 

I will persevere and give it a try in the next couple of days (weeks). If there is some space, I will put some in a coolroom that sits at about 18-20 oC and the others just in my house (at about double the temperature) and check the difference

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post #97 of 115

How do you know if sauerkraut is spoiled? I first checked it after about a week. there was a spot of blue mold on top along with the usual white mold. . Skimmed it, added brine. Just checked it after three weeks. White powdery mold on top of water, no blue mold, no smell, a little funky but I assume that is to be expected. It seems fine. I just don't want to eat it and make myself sick.  

post #98 of 115
Thread Starter 

Chefwriter, you should be fine.  It sounds like relatively "normal" mold growth, which can take place on top of the brine.  As long as it is on the surface then you should be good to go.  Even in my closed fermentation crock, I sometimes get mold (if I check it too often or leave the lid off for too long).  I just skim it off and continue fermenting

post #99 of 115
Just some interesting rye FYI.......
http://ianchadwick.com/blog/bread-madness-and-christianity/
http://werewolves.monstrous.com/ergot_poisoning.htm

So @panini you and your baker peeps got off lightly .... or not ;-)

mimi
post #100 of 115

Thank you Pete. I am using a closed fermentation crock. Glad to hear confirmation. I made kraut several years ago when I first got the crock but not since then. The mold was on top of the brine, not in it. Skimmed it and topped off the brine. Adding caraway to experiment. We'll see how that works. Thanks again. 

post #101 of 115

Talking crock pots etc:

What size would you figure is a good size to get just for 1 or 2 people?

Just for some sauerkraut and the occasional pickle?

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post #102 of 115

I do all my kraut/pickles/kimchi/etc. in "brewing buckets".  They are unbreakable, have tight fitting snap lids that be drilled and fitted for an airlock and can stack neatly on top of one another (without the airlock), and I have ready access to as many as I need. 1 to 20 gallon sizes.

post #103 of 115
Thread Starter 

Butzy,

Although you can get the fermentation crocks as small as 5 liters, I would suggest getting a 10 liter one.  It will give you plenty of room and you won't have to worry about outgrowing it, at least for awhile.

post #104 of 115

Thanks,

The 10 ltr ones are going to be too heavy for me to import, so I will go for some food safe buckets for now (with a waterlock). And maybe a little baby crock, just because they look so cute :p

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post #105 of 115
Thread Starter 

You can also create your own out of large glass jars with tight fitting lids.  Just drill a hole in the lid, fit with a rubber "O" ring and put a fermentation lock in it.

post #106 of 115

In the farmers market in my city New York I sometimes purchase kim chee and kim chee juice ( there spelling ) from hawthorne valley . The stuff is so good I'm almost addicted. Ingredients; organic cabbage organic radish carrots onions hot chili peppers unrefined sea salt , garlic and organic ginger . It's all organic.

Can I make this at home?????? 

It makes you feel so good going down Into the stomach.

A 15 ounce jar is five dollars for the juice, and eight dollars for the cabbage mixture.

I guess if I could make it, it would be cheaper, I could have more of it ,and it lasts a very long time in the refrigerator?

 

 

Alex

post #107 of 115

I just did a batch of Kimchee... should be ready to go next week.

post #108 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefWD View Post
 

I just did a batch of Kimchee... should be ready to go next week.


Hi, How did you do it . please explain. I'd also love to see a picture.

 

 

Thank's 

post #109 of 115

I decided I would give it a go with green tomatoes. I used dill seed, mustard seed, black peppercorns, and garlic. The brine is a standard salt brine, no vinegar. I will let them ferment for a few days and then put them in the refrigerator. I also added a handful of pearl onions. I am trying it out in a glass mason jar this time, using a plastic cup with a little water added in it to weigh everything down under the brine. Keeping my fingers crossed.

post #110 of 115

Good luck, I certainly enjoy mine. I just keep making much too small batches.

 

 

 

mjb

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post #111 of 115

Looks good @teamfat .. I debated how to slice them but decided I'd go with wedges for now. I smelled them today and saw the off gas. It's pretty awesome how when you pack them they don't smell like much.. but after 1 day of fermentation there is a rich "garlic dill" smell going on. I've already decided that next year I'll have a cherry tomato plant for the garden just to pickle them green! I also need to plant some of my dill seeds so I can have ready access to fresh dill without paying $3.00 a pop.

 

Edit: Well they are done as of this morning. There's enough garlic in there to kill a moose.

 


Edited by eastshores - 11/18/14 at 9:36am
post #112 of 115

Never to much garlic! I use the pickled garlic in salads, or just munch it.

post #113 of 115

I'm currently fermenting grape tomatoes. These may be one of my favorite ferments to date because they are so easy to make. I washed a quart of grape tomatoes, poke a hole in each of them with a toothpick. I placed them in a canning jar within an inch and a half of the top and add a basil leaf every few inch. I added 4 cups of water with 3 tablespoons of sea salt.

 

post #114 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaynna View Post
 

I'm currently fermenting grape tomatoes. These may be one of my favorite ferments to date because they are so easy to make. I washed a quart of grape tomatoes, poke a hole in each of them with a toothpick. I placed them in a canning jar within an inch and a half of the top and add a basil leaf every few inch. I added 4 cups of water with 3 tablespoons of sea salt.

Wow those look gorgeous. So that's it, that's how you do it? No vinegar? Do you then leave the can at room temperature? For how long? I have some excellent grape tomatoes at my farmer's market, I want to try that!!

post #115 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Wow those look gorgeous. So that's it, that's how you do it? No vinegar? Do you then leave the can at room temperature? For how long? I have some excellent grape tomatoes at my farmer's market, I want to try that!!

 

No vinegar @French Fries. :I cover it with my DIY airlock and place in a dark area cabinet for example in 3 – 5 days.  If you don’t have an airlock system you can cover loosely so that gases can escape. Refrigerate it after 3 -5 days. By the way, I also use several basil leaves on the top to help keep the tomatoes under water. I used a glass canning lid to weigh down the vegetables to be sure they are kept under the brine. The basil imparts a wonderful, aromatic, sweetness to the tomatoes. :) You can try it sometime. 

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