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Have you already heard about Nesmuk knives? What do you think about them?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

The reason for my question (and my sign up here): I discovered a really great looking cutlery in Germany: Nesmuk! They claim to achive the perfect knife. With extraordinary blades, steels and materials for the handles - most knives are handmade in ancient tradition.  The prices reach from 300 to about 5000 Euro (!).

Can anyone tell me if they are really worth the price? What do you think about Nesmuk (for forming your opinion, maybe have a look at: http://nesmuk.de/en) .

Looking forward for your guesses...

post #2 of 9

They're not in a design or style that is of interest to me personally.  Too much curvature in the handle, too much gap between the handle and the blade so a pinch grip gets weird. Shallow hollow grinds, which are poorly suited to kitchen work.  Blades are on the short side.

 

I find it interesting the choice of name. Nessmuk was the chosen name of George Sears, a well known outdoorsman. His cutting tools were a folding pocket knife, a hump backed drop point sort of skinner and a double bit hatchet. . 

 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 9

That's interesting, because my first thought was that it kind of looks like a skinning knife.  I can't think of any task in my kitchen that is not better filled by other knives I already have.  The handles look uncomfortable and the blade shapes are weird and also very short.

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you for your answer!

Don't know if Nesmuk really got something to do with Nessmuk (George Sears) or if it is just a remarkable coindicence.. ;-)

I hope, that there is no misunderstanding: In my question I do specially mean the chef's knives by Nesmuk (http://nesmuk.de/en/collection/nesmuk-exklusiv/) NOT really the pocket knives (http://nesmuk.de/en/folder/nesmuk-folder-exklusiv/ )...

post #5 of 9
Here a few comments from our German counterparts:

http://www.messerforum.net/showthread.php?87809-Nesmuk-kann-das-was
post #6 of 9
For those who don't read German: a few observations I've noticed: very expensive, very unusual profiles, valuable materials, thick behind the edge, lot of marketing stuff, no clarity about steel formula and heat treatment. Good performance, nothing that exceptional. At that price point you may get much better by good bespoke knife makers.
My own comment: if you're uncertain about your own preferences better have a middle-of-the-road gyuto, fine tune your technique perhaps and see what you like and dislike.
post #7 of 9

Over priced, over marketed, kinda santoku blades.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #8 of 9

And  the profile is a refinement of a Tosagata santoku, that sells for $50 or so.

 

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #9 of 9

Thanks to considerable original work in biomechanics and motor control I can adapt to almost any knife very well.  That being said, I would much sooner adapt myself to the Vic Rosewood chef's I bought just to see how good a $40 knife it made - rather than that $$$$ oddball Nesmuk.

 

 

Rick

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