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Blanching purple veg.

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I was taught to use a little vin. in my salt solution to "seal" in the color but it still seems to bleed a little. Any suggestion?
post #2 of 10

@alaminute, From what I know the color is in the skin which will dilute with h2o. I don't know if it's possible to lock in the colors. I do know that when I grill purple vegies, I soak them in a little lemon juice before grilling and they seem so stay bright. hths

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post #3 of 10

I don't know how much this will help, but I seem to remember Rene Redzepi melting butter and pouring it over vegetables in a strainer to ever so lightly poach them, but hey nothing wrong with experimentation.

post #4 of 10

Sous vide blanching works incredibly well for purple root veg, especially potatoes and carrots.  Also for potatoes cooking them in the skin then cutting them will help them keep their colour.  If you're talking about purple beans you're somewhat out of luck as I've not heard of a good method, though sous vide blanching is probably still your best bet.  Also try oil blanching.

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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
I'm definitely gonna go sous vide, that sounds like a great idea. Does it still bleed into other veg. when sautéing together, say purple baby carrots with other rainbow baby carrots? I'm pretty sure the moms method will fully Blanche the root vegetables. Thanks for the input guys
post #6 of 10

Try baking soda in the blanching liquid. About 3 Tbsp per gallon of water. You can also use soda water.

 

edit: I also forgot this part.....

 

What method are you using? The add to pot on burner and blanch or bring water to boil, remove from heat and pour over veg? Personally, my best results have occurred strictly sticking to the latter. That method, you add the baking soda just after removing from the heat. Have your veg sitting in a perf hotel pan 200 in a 400 pan. That way your ice bath can be in the same and it's a quick and effortless transfer between pans. If you're using soda water, the same pans are used so just heat to temp, pour over veg and ice bath after 60 seconds or so 


Edited by oldschool1982 - 9/22/14 at 5:42pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschool1982 View Post
 

Try baking soda in the blanching liquid. About 3 Tbsp per gallon of water. You can also use soda water.

 

edit: I also forgot this part.....

 

What method are you using? The add to pot on burner and blanch or bring water to boil, remove from heat and pour over veg? Personally, my best results have occurred strictly sticking to the latter. That method, you add the baking soda just after removing from the heat. Have your veg sitting in a perf hotel pan 200 in a 400 pan. That way your ice bath can be in the same and it's a quick and effortless transfer between pans. If you're using soda water, the same pans are used so just heat to temp, pour over veg and ice bath after 60 seconds or so 


I thought baking soda was a no-no, as it causes vegetables to lose their vitamins and nutrients. I know it does for green veggies....

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post
 


I thought baking soda was a no-no, as it causes vegetables to lose their vitamins and nutrients. I know it does for green veggies....

I honestly can't remember if it does or not but speaking strictly from an appearance standpoint........I have used (and seen used) both soda water and baking soda to help retain color. On the other hand, some could argue heighten is more appropriate a term but the bleeding causes color loss so in theory, wouldn't that be the same thing?

 

IMHO. the thing about cooking purple veggies ahead (maybe even at anytime) is they will bleed some no matter what recipe or technique you follow. I've found not so much an issue with yellow, orange, red or green veggies but bleed with happen.

 

Purple cabbage is in one of my salad mix recipes and I would steep it over night in the cooler using water. It's then been mixed in with the greens for the duration of a good shelf-life without bleeding and discoloring any of the other ingredients. However, when I pre-blanch, it would often be off color by the second shift so I would prefer to blanch more "to-order" and avoid this issue.

 

If the soda does in fact remove nutrients and becomes an issue, try soaking in cold water for an hour or so (maybe even over night) before blanching to seen what that does. I think vinegar is used to set colors in the laundry too so......speaking from an "appearance only pov" it could be used like lemon juice. Not a bad idea but I also believe that using anything other than water (soda or not) can add or change the flavor/taste....that is......unless you're not worried about adding acidity to the mix which does work for some foods.

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
I Blanche everything pretty much the same way: boiling water- salty like the sea in a pot big enough that when I add my product it doesn't lose my boil. Immediately into an ice bath as soon as it's firm yet tender.
I.e. The right way, lol.
It's a little naive of me to say but I'm not really concerned about what nutrients it affects as long as the flavor is there and I'd do whatever to keep that nice purple 'pop'. I'll certainly try the baking soda and I haven't done the sous vide yet but am anxious to try. Lately I've just been roasting all purple veg to keep the color.
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post


I thought baking soda was a no-no, as it causes vegetables to lose their vitamins and nutrients. I know it does for green veggies....

Once you cook veg using any traditional method they loose vitamins and nutrients. whether it's roasting, sautéing or steaming. The only way to avoid this is eat veg raw. Another point to consider in America at least. We depleted the majority of nutrients in our soil many years ago via over farming soil. Nutrients and vitamins in food just don't exists here, short of smaller organic farms. This should not be a real concern of yours.
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