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Prime Rib disaster wagyu - Kinda

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hey all first post here!

 

I found a recipe to cook prime rib in an oven.  The recipe said to preheat an oven to 500 degrees and cook it for 5 x the number of lbs. minutes.  Then leave it in the oven unopened for 2 hours. Well I use convection which I should have adjusted before and I didn't have a thermometer in it which was my second mistake.  So the prime rib came out and was way over done.  I would call it medium well and I sliced it fast to stop it from cooking and it turned grey on all exposed sides.  Normally I cook prime rib on my showtime rotisserie (don't laugh) and it is great.  I saw a local Alto Shaam for sale and wondered if it made sense for me as a home enthusiast to own one.  I don't need to hold so I don't think it was worth it and wanted to prove to myself I could cook a prime rib in the oven.  

 

By the way it was only kinda a disaster because it was still very tender and yummy.  I can't imagine it if it were cooked properly!

 

Any thoughts?

 

Thanks!

 

Neil


Edited by heffneil - 9/21/14 at 11:04am
post #2 of 12

5  minutes per rib @ 500 degrees then turn the oven off and don't open the door for two hours.  Is that what you meant to say?

 

That's about how I cook eye of round - 500 for however many minutes per pound then turn the oven off and don't even peek for two hours.  Comes out a nice medium rare on the inside. 

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

I read 5 minutes per lb so mine was about 4 lbs so I put it in for 16 minutes.

 

Do you think the convection was the fault? Or do you think perhaps it was teh wagyu that cooked differently?

 

 I never cooked Wagyu before?

 

Thanks!

 

Neil

post #4 of 12

@heffneil,

Hi and welcome to ChefTalk. When it comes to Wagyu or any other roast I wouldn't use the no peek method. I would invest in a good instant read thermometer. I would also adjust for the convection or just use regular bake. HTH's

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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

Yeah I learned a valuable / expensive lesson but still ate pretty good :)

 

That was the good part. The next time I want to get it right!

 

Thanks!

 

Neil

post #6 of 12

Oh gosh!  I'm sorry to hear that.  Usually for prime rib I start it in a very hot oven 500F for about 15 minutes and then I turn it down really low to 300.  No convection.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #7 of 12


In my lifetime I have cooked 1000s of pounds of prime rib. about 250-300  weekly .

     Best of all are the ones I both cooked and held in Alto Sham. Hardly any shrinkage, tender like butter and even using there directions comes out perfect every time

     . I also do reheats in standard oven by wrapping rib in plastic wrap and then restaurant aluminum foil (its heavy grade ) 200 degrees about 2hours depending on rib size., also comes out perfect.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 12

Never any experience with Wagyu, but last Christmas we went crazy with a 10-pound USDA Prime grade, bone-in Prime Rib roast from the local society butcher.  We're still paying it off.  We left it unwrapped in the fridge overnight, gave it a not-too-strong rub of salt, pepper, and couple of spices and brought to room temperature.  Put it in our preheated MasterCraft electric smoker (which can set and hold a temp very well) at 225*, with just a very little mesquite smoke and a temperature probe in place.

 

The big uncertainty was how long it would take to reach 135*, but our research/guesstimates turned out pretty well- it was 4-1/2 hours, so we ate about 5:30 instead of maybe midnight. We rested it a half hour and then gave it a short blast in a 550* oven for a bit of a crust.  It was the most wonderful wall-to-wall medium-rare beef roast I've ever had.

 

We may do this next Christmas, instead of the family's traditional aged country ham. Unless we decide to use the money for a down payment on a really nice new car..

 

.Mike  :thumb: 

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

@heffneil,

Hi and welcome to ChefTalk. When it comes to Wagyu or any other roast I wouldn't use the no peek method. I would invest in a good instant read thermometer. I would also adjust for the convection or just use regular bake. HTH's


This this this! I picked up a probe for $40 so I leave it in huge roasts wired out and stick it on the counter. It's indispensable!

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #10 of 12

I have a half dozen of these floating around the kitchen and stuck to the pellet box on the smoker. Very handy for a lot of things. 

 

post #11 of 12

Check out companies such as Thermoworks, and get an accurate (+- .1% or so) dual-probe thermometer.  I have a single-probe and it's fine, but wish I'd gotten the dual.  (I also use their Thermopen instant response for other stuff, which has saved me hundreds of hours and loads of frustration with my bbq pit.)

 

Then you just stick one probe into the center of the meat and wait for the temp to get to where you want.  A second probe is kinda neat for using with two pieces of meat, or indicating true oven temperature.  Can even find oven hot spots if you want. 

Or, if you're not feeling well I suppose it would make a good rectal thermometer if you're the careful and steady type.            <[ : ^ )

 

If you buy one, do your homework on which probes to get...there are tons of them.  Here's the one I got, with an extra ss probe for leaving in the meat in the oven.  The probe shown can be used as an instant read, but I still like using the Thermopen better for quick checks.

 

Please excuse my warped so-called sense of humor.

 

ThermoWorks Image

post #12 of 12

When checking on the chamber temp of my smoker I often stick the probe all the way through a small potato so the tip is not resting on the metal grate. Those thermometers located in the top probably do more harm than good for backyard pit masters.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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