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The Chefs Jacket - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by SandSquid View Post

 

I iron all my jackets, and yes even my baggy houndstooths on laundry day, right before they get folded for my locker.

But I'm funny like that. The Military trained me to take pride in my uniform.
Yeah I've always been trained that taking pride in your kit (and the state thereof) will help you take pride in your work.
post #32 of 48

Iron?  Isn't that what most steels are made of?

 

Seriously though, I never iron, take the stuff out of the dryer when it's about 95% dry and stick it on a coat hanger, it'll look "freshly ironed".  I learned that trick from a waiter.......

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #33 of 48
Yeah I know that trick or you can just not put them in the dryer and airdry if you don't have high humidity where you live. Save on electricity! Learned that one hand washing washing the one jacket I started out with at my first job.
post #34 of 48

And don't think the staff Chef/Instructors don't take notice.

 


Let me relay a cool little story that happened to me that puts this into perfect perspective:


Way back in my second week of Culinary School, we were standing outside our lab waiting to go in, and one particular student say's to me:
"You actually iron your aprons??? I would never waste my time..."  I looked at her already rumpled and stained uniform and replied: "Yes, I can see that."

So, fast foreword about a year: someone from the front office approaches me and asks: We need a student to accompany one of the Chef's to do a live TV spot, would you be interested, you'd need to leave in 5 minutes and go straight to the studio."  I grabbed a freshly ironed jacket from my locker and headed out.  By the time I returned word had passed around the school where I had taken off to, and lo and behold that very same student literally stomped on up to me all indignant and said "I don't know why they asked _you_, when any one of us could have done that."   Now, this little tantrum, that she was pretty famous for, took place in the middle of a crowded student lounge and she was being quite loud and obnoxious about it... So since she was being a real snot about it, I just as loudly asked her if she remembered back to the second week of school when she asked me why I bothered to iron my aprons. She said "Yeah, so... ???"   I replied: "This is a perfect example of  _exactly_ why I bother to iron my aprons."  Granted, I was being a total ass to her at this point, but I really just couldn't resist, it was such a perfect opportunity.  Karma has no time limit, and it sure is a bitch.
 

post #35 of 48
On the whole 'air-drying' topic, I live in phoenix with high temp, and low humidity so when I hang my coats outside they always dry in 10-15 minutes lol
post #36 of 48

Interesting subject, as everyone comes to work it seems dressed in what makes em happy/comfortable....That is unless, you're required to wear specific attire.....I'm of the opinion that you come to work mentally and outwardly prepared to get the job done in the best way you know how.  Outwardly prepared meaning you either wear the required uniform, washed, not wrinkled and dirty from last night's shift...or, being the Sous, Executive, Head Chef, whatever you want to call those in a management position, you come in looking as professional as you. One, you set an example for those around/below you and you're telling others you take pride in your position. Lol, now whether your choice is white or black, paisley, tye-died, ect...doesn't really matter....And if you work in a particularly hot kitchen, they make some spiffy, moisture-wicking shirts and coats that look rather dapper in my opinion....I've long been perplexed by seeing how some of my co-workers have come to work in the past....swim trunks, old t-shirts, non-conforming, non-nonslip shoes....I tend to dress, as I've said, in a fashion that sets an example for my co-workers.....Oh, and I've been a head chef for the last 3 years at my current job, and I'm still the best-dressed person in the restaurant...Just my two cents.....carry on folks....

 

Tony..

post #37 of 48
Someone once told me 'you should dress for the job you want to have, not the job you have' so I've always been willing to spend a little extra time and money on my coats etc.
post #38 of 48
OK. Here's what I was talking about. NO, I don't work for these guys, and this is not any sales pitch. I don't even wear these coats. But still however, I will consider them when I am looking to shop.


http://www.happychefuniforms.com/800-347-0288/

examples:
Royal Blue CookCool Chef Coats

MEN's: Closeout Price $11.99 / WOMEN's: Closeout Price $12.99

White CookCool Chef T-Shirt

Closeout Price $9.99

Women's Pink Zip Pocket Lightweight Chef Coat

Closeout Price $15.99


So foodpump ...
I'm not sayin' ... I'm just sayin'.
post #39 of 48
I like the short sleeved ones with the breast pocket. I think that's about as far as I would go. I have worn the tunic style but I find them to be alot hotter because they don't actually open they just fold over. I don't like wearing a t-shirt I have done it before, even the Dickies twill buttonups and I think it looks too casual.
post #40 of 48

Yeah, try cleaning/scrubbing down a flattop or straining a fryer with short sleeves.  You'll only  it once.....

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #41 of 48

I exclusively wear khaki chef coats. Brown, gray, slate, maroon. They're the only ones I can get to not show stains so badly. I've thrown away about 10 white chef coats and have just given up on them.

 

Personally, I prefer to just wear a button up dishwasher shirt, but I feel like there are expectations on me professionally and for my cooks to take me seriously.

post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

Yeah, try cleaning/scrubbing down a flattop or straining a fryer with short sleeves.  You'll only  it once.....


I take my chef coat off when it's time to clean up, and this includes cleaning the flat top (if I'm the one doing it).  Done it this way for 25 years with no problems.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #43 of 48
I just posted the pics from an email ad that I got. Go look at the site. They have a nice enough selection.


NO. I don't work for them. I don't own any coats from them either. They're just a nice company.

I'm not sayin' ... I'm just sayin'. (You know ... conversation.)
post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

Yeah, try cleaning/scrubbing down a flattop or straining a fryer with short sleeves.  You'll only  it once.....

 

Actually we all do it in short sleeves....i guess it could depend on the size of the flat top however. 

post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

Yeah, try cleaning/scrubbing down a flattop or straining a fryer with short sleeves.  You'll only  it once.....
I've cleaned many a plancha... no problems. I can stick my hands in a fryer, it's just a matter of wicking off the oil before it cooks your skin. Never had splashback spidering a fryer though... might want to be a bit more careful! My arms are all burned up, my hands have very little feeling left in them. I'm not really concerned with the condition of my forearms, I wear my scars with honour and pride wink.gif I do not, however, wear the heat rash around my elbows with the same kind of vigour.
post #46 of 48

Greetings,

I only put my white french knot chef coat on when I go into the dining room, lounge or ballrooms. Other than that I will not wear one in the kitchen. Hounds tooth or black exec pants, white t-shirt. I have been asked why I do not wear one in my kitchen, my reply is that I find the chef coat to "binding" on me and restricts my focus on multitasking, especial line cooking when I need to. I do not worry about food or sauce splatters from prepping/cooking. I have my days with red sauces and carry a spare shirt in my office.  Back in the day a chef broke me of my sloppiness, and has always stuck with me. I tell my cooks, sloppy coat/apron, sloppy food.

 

 

I would like to add something off topic. To all culinary students, keep your hands and fingernails clean and trimmed. Please wash your hands with a nail brush. Especially if you are in a dining room carving or whatever. People notice dirt under fingernails. Do not wear soiled uniforms of any sort outside where the client sees you.

 

 

You are blessed

post #47 of 48
I have wore many colors don't care for white while working In the kitchen but think it's nice to have a new one for meetings and such I personally wear a t-shirt and shorts while online you need to be comfortable while cooking and I keep pants and a coat for if 8 have a meeting or working a buffet. I have hard water and any grease turns yellow on white ones. If I must wear one while cooking I get the mesh back and short sleeve.
post #48 of 48

White. Don't be dirty. Stay neat.

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