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Looking for a Gyuto - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Thread Starter 

Yes I was thinking about squash, watermelon, pineapples...

 

Quote:
 I never had an issue because it would be flexing.

Nice!

 

MillionKnives has already told me that with fine blade it is matter of technique. ( I asked you the same question because you have Akifusa since 3 years)

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by krx927 

 

the only problem you will have after buying is that after some time you will want to try out some other Japanese knives  ;)

...I am already in the mood for :D

 

Thanks! 

 

PS: do you have 210 or 240 ? I have a little kitchen my board is 16x16in (40x40cm) I prefer 210 but I am wondering about 240... 


Edited by kreisky - 10/14/14 at 11:59pm
post #32 of 42
Quote:

 

PS: do you have 210 or 240 ? I have a little kitchen my board is 16x16in (40x40cm) I prefer 210 but I am wondering about 240... 

 

I have 210 as I prefer this size. Before my times of Japanese knives I bought one Henckels 240 (or similar). I really did not like it too much as it was too big and heavy. I was lucky that I could sold it to some friend. Perhaps this size for light Japanese knife would be OK, perhaps I will order my fourth Gyuto in this size  ;)

post #33 of 42
Sometimes 210 is just too short. You mentioned watermelon, which is definitely a case where it is short. A head of lettuce or cabbage could take more effort than it needs to with a shorter knife.
post #34 of 42

Unless your counters are only a foot wide the size of your kitchen, or cutting board for that matter, is irrelevant.  You already have a small Gyuto, 240+ does seem the way to go from there.

 

 

Rick

post #35 of 42

Two more advantages of a 240 mm. gyuto: more knuckle clearence, more food to pick up with the wider blade.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #36 of 42
I would add: better edge retention due to the larger board contact area.
post #37 of 42
Thread Starter 

Thank you very much, your opinions are really helpful. A month ago I didn't know about nothing concerning Japanese knife, now I can choose between laser, medium weight, workhorse, convex grind, flat profile or belly, different steels etc.

 

Akifusa is the one if I choose stainless steel, but now I wonder "jumping" directly into carbon knives :rolleyes:, I mean, clad carbon knives.

 

Looking around, I found that Richmond AS Laser could be a nice choice. The blade's grind remind me to Konosuke Ginsan. Thin grind with a more stiff spine, convex profile for non-sticking yet medium-light weight and wa-handle (I like wa handle). Not as flat as Akifusa but not too belly. I hope/believe that Richmond is stiffer than other Laser.

 

The inconvenient I see are that the very thin grind of Richmond could be more fragile or prone to break than Akifusa, and, of course, rust issue. I don't mind patina or discoloring but rust is quite a problem. If I am not wrong, white steel is more reactive than blue steel.

What about blue steel 1, 2 or AS ?

I read on zknives.com that Chromium is added for corrosion resistance, and blue steel 1, 2 or AS have the same percentage of it. So... it seems to be the same rust resistance for all types of blue steel.

 

I have not found a lot of review on this knife... do you think that for hard ingredient Akifusa and Richmond are about on the same level ? If Richmond is more flexible/fragile than Akifusa, then it's not the good choice for me. 

 

marco

post #38 of 42

I personally am not concerned with food sticking to a knife.  Even if you can zip through zucchini so fast that it flies, so what if the coins travel a bit.  I only vaguely recall the Akifusa's dimensions but I don't believe they were too thin.  The Vic Rosewould I reviewed recently had perfectly flat sides to which a potato would stick as if held by a vaccum pump, so what?  The fact is the same potato slid off very easily, so what need really is their for it to flop off as it would with a thick and convex grind that would not go through a carrot so easily and also jam somewhat in large squash and swede?  Certainly you can have totally different knives for each task you come across, but to pick one knife to do it all I personally would take the reasonably thin one with the great steel, ie, Akifusa.

 

 

Rick

post #39 of 42
Thread Starter 

Thank you Rick, I understand what you mean. 

I have not cutting skills nor experience, but the only thing that I don't like to much of my little flat and thin gyuto is the fact that it is sticking. 

But if the knife is to thick and it jams on squash or don't cut easily carrots... I also prefer a "reasonably thin one".

 

 

Marco 

post #40 of 42

I think you should just buy one and not worry so much! All of the knives discussed in this tread will give you so much better performance than any of non Japanese ones. You cannot even compare!

 

And like mentioned earlier very soon you will want to some other Japanese knife to try.

 

And just my 2 ct, I would go at the beginning for non carbon one. Carbon steel literally needs wiping as you work + immediate cleaning and wiping with dry cloth. Sometimes it is a hassle. This is why I have both types. If I am lazy in the evening cutting my prosciutto I can just leave it on the counter...

post #41 of 42

Blue steel does have a hair more corrosion resistance than white steel, but in either case, it is generally the cladding that is what is most reactive, not the core steel, and the cladding can be all over the map as far as reactivity. I've got a mono steel white #2 knife with a solid patina, and find it to be very UN-reactive, whereas I have a blue #2 knife that has a very reactive cladding, and I used to have a Tojiro ITK knife that was white #2 and the cladding on that was EXTREMELY reactive. It seemed to get orange rust if you just looked at it funny...

post #42 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by krx927 View Post
 

I think you should just buy one and not worry so much! All of the knives discussed in this tread will give you so much better performance than any of non Japanese ones. You cannot even compare!

 

And like mentioned earlier very soon you will want to some other Japanese knife to try.

 

And just my 2 ct, I would go at the beginning for non carbon one. Carbon steel literally needs wiping as you work + immediate cleaning and wiping with dry cloth. Sometimes it is a hassle. This is why I have both types. If I am lazy in the evening cutting my prosciutto I can just leave it on the counter...

 

krx927 I don't worry at all :) I just like speaking and evaluating different possibility... but you're right, it's time to buy !

Thank you for all yours information ! 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DenverVeggieNut View Post
 

Blue steel does have a hair more corrosion resistance than white steel, but in either case, it is generally the cladding that is what is most reactive, not the core steel, and the cladding can be all over the map as far as reactivity. I've got a mono steel white #2 knife with a solid patina, and find it to be very UN-reactive, whereas I have a blue #2 knife that has a very reactive cladding, and I used to have a Tojiro ITK knife that was white #2 and the cladding on that was EXTREMELY reactive. It seemed to get orange rust if you just looked at it funny...

 

... not too funny :rolleyes: 

I wrote "clad carbon knife" but I meant: stainless clad on a carbon core ;).

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