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Is this just something that happens in kitchens?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I have a few issues and I am not sure if this is just the way it is or if it doesn't happen as muchi n good kitchens.

A lot of the time chef speak very quickly and the turn away when they are talking. This makes it hard to understand them.  I am the kind of person that needs instruction to be clear and maybe spoken to me a bit slower that some people.

Is chefs speaking to quickly just something that happens in kitchen or is it less common in better more well run kitchens.

post #2 of 8

Must be a foreigner correct? Chefs SHOULD speak slowly and deliberately, some would call it yelling like a drill Sargent.

 

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmQrAV0TE4k&index=13&list=PLfhZJUjQ3uPCQigqkv_m-WwRQaX6G-4d4

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KwEmufmoRps

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLH35GirFEQ

post #3 of 8
"A foreigner"... A bit perjorative, no??

Yes, people should enunciate clearly. Unfortunately if you are in the middle of service you're not being realistic to expect your chef to face you and enunciate clearly and slowly... You may need to communicate that you have trouble hearing them (I like to tell people "I'm deaf")... You may also just need to work on paying attention, I can listen to 2 or 3 conversations at once all while working at my station.
post #4 of 8

Ignore the bullshit and pay attention to what only is needed for orders; any changes to the table... who wants to listen to someone bump their gums anyway.:bounce:

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpoiledBroth View Post

"A foreigner"... A bit perjorative, no??

Yes, people should enunciate clearly. Unfortunately if you are in the middle of service you're not being realistic to expect your chef to face you and enunciate clearly and slowly... You may need to communicate that you have trouble hearing them (I like to tell people "I'm deaf")... You may also just need to work on paying attention, I can listen to 2 or 3 conversations at once all while working at my station.

 

This is a great answer. Always make sure you're always paying attention, nothing gets on my nerves more than repeating myself 3 times to fire a french onion soup...

post #6 of 8
As to what Andrew said, usually there is a "call phrase" that comes immediately before firing a new table or dish, "ce marche", "on order", "adding on" - because some kitchens can be quite bad for crosstalk depending on the size of the brigade and the standards for conduct during service, you can just focus on perking up when you hear "ce marche" or whatever, but typically always listen to your Chef; even if you've deemed the conversation as non-pertinent to your station it's never bad to know what's going on. Typically in my experience a good Chef doesn't speak unless issuing orders or criticizing your/other plates -- both important to listen to.
post #7 of 8

I'm speaking to the average American kitchen here when I say....I call tickets like a drill instructor.  LOUD AND CLEAR.  Nothing irritates me more when the fry guy says he didn't hear a call.  As was mentioned in an earlier post...you should be paying attention....not fiddling with your phone, not changing the station on the kitchen radio, etc....A good ticket caller will also monitor the stations around him to ensure items have been fired that need to be fired and will follow up with said fry cook to ensure he has such and such working....etc.......I've worked with and around "mutterers", guys that don't speak loudly and enunciate clearly.  Nothing contributes to dropped tickets/items than lack of communication....that's what this job is all about....Best rule here is.....the guy shouldn't be there if he can't communicate effectively....every bit as important as cooking a perfect mid-rare filet...

 

Tony..

post #8 of 8

I guess it probably depends on the situation. I've been running around like crazy and have had people keep calling me over to show them something, but it seemed like they just wanted to chat with me. So, sometimes I can only explain something while I'm pacing back and forth and doing something else at the same time.

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