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What's your favorite salad? - Page 3

post #61 of 81
@French Fries speaking of cassoulet, will we be seeing one from you in the stew challenge?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #62 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

@French Fries speaking of cassoulet, will we be seeing one from you in the stew challenge?

Hmmm I'm not sure it's still summer and barbecues and salads around here. I will be probably be making one as soon as the winter hits though (which for SoCal means as soon as the average temp falls below 75F)! 

post #63 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

That Thai salad is a killer FF. Beautiful!

Thanks @ordo ! 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

@French Fries  On the topic of thai salads, I love green papaya salad with some dried shrimp, fish sauce, chiles, crushed peanut, and thinly sliced beef.  That is my happy place!

I love green papaya salad but I'm not a big fan of the dried shrimps, and I've never had it with beef. I usually make it without any protein, and serve it as a side dish. And almost anything with fish sauce takes me to my happy place!! I must have some Vietnamese blood somewhere...?? :lol:

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

That Thai salad reminded me of one I have not made for a while.  Cold soba noodles, this strips of rare roast beef, various sweet and hot peppers, dressed with a soy and sushi vinegar mix. And topped with sesame seeds.

 

And one I made for a number of summer backyard dinners at various friends' places was lentils with bell pepper, green onion, diced pepperoni and salami with various sorts of Italian dressing.

Oooh that first one sounds very good, I used to make a soba noodle/carrots/cucumber/sesame oil salad... haven't made it in a while but I should make it again. 

 

That last one reminds me of muffaletta salad... good stuff!!

post #64 of 81

Here's one I made a while ago: chick peas, eggs, red bell peppers, tomatoes, cornichons, cucumbers, avocados, scallions, croutons, & Comté:

 


Edited by French Fries - 10/14/14 at 12:15pm
post #65 of 81

My current favorite salad is baby spinach, thinly sliced red onion, julienne sun dried tomatoes, sliced dried apricots, glazed walnuts, and crumbled feta cheese with a balsamic vinaigrette.

post #66 of 81

Beet and potato salad with smoked salmon.
post #67 of 81
And yes, that's kale on the bottom. Dressed with a roasted shallot vinaigrette.
post #68 of 81
Watercress makes the best salads it's a shame it's so hard to find good watercress. It always seems to be wilted in the store and even at the farmers markets they seem to abuse it.

Watercress, blue cheese, walnuts, apple and a lemon vin.
post #69 of 81

I think watercress just has a very short shelf life. It seems to be very full of moisture and delicate. I can't keep the stuff in the fridge more than 3 days without it smelling like a swamp.

post #70 of 81

Watercress - wow. It has been a long time, but I remember going up City Creek Canyon and picking fresh watercress along the banks. I should head up there and see if there is still any around.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #71 of 81
Yeah it's either gotta be an intimate experience with watercress, or it's gotta be soup.
post #72 of 81

I've had good luck finding decent watercress in Asian markets. Vietnamese/Chinese specifically. May be a higher turnover rate, but it's always pretty perky and fresh in the markets in my neighborhood, which is very heavily Vietmamese and ethnic Chinese from Vietmam.

post #73 of 81

Cobb correctly done

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #74 of 81

Tomato, Stone Fruit and Mozzarella Salad- Combines several favorite Italian salads


Get recipe here: Online CookBook

post #75 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by homecookproject View Post
 

Caesar for sure. Especially when the croutons are from homemade bread. Here's one I did a couple of months ago. I need to work on the plating, but whatever.

 


You can't take wealth with you when you die, and you can't take plating into your stomach ( it looks fine to me anyway). Caesar is awesome and I hate generic croutons.

 

Sometimes I like a variation with blue cheese and steak or chicken (which may be more greek?).

 

I think teens / college age prefer ranch to any other dressing so favorites can be age related. I don't tend to have a favorite, but favorites. I like Coleslaw on the tart side with pineapple in it.

 

Here's a salad I made that turned some heads:

 

 

-Not for the plating -lol. It’s romaine lettuce, vidalia onion, orange cheddar, blueberries, balsamic vinegar, and macadamia nut oil. It can go good with hard cooked egg or chicken.

 

The only time I've liked Iceberg in a salad was at the local Japanese restaurant where they have some fruity orange dressing on it. -Not a favorite, but got me to accept iceberg as edible.

post #76 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Cobb correctly done
That is another fav of mine. Actually , it's a meal in itself.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #77 of 81

In a business trip to France recently I had a salad with lettuce I don't remember now which along with some other stuff, mainly because of the prominence of 3, one in particular unbelievable-delicious and thin sliced, slightly warm cured pork products the names of which I didn't remember to ask.  That would be my all-time favorite.

 

But practically every evening its romaine with a mix of bitter greens tossed with whatever dressing (often spiked with a so-called late-harvest wine vinegar), topped with translucent/limp-thin onion slices, similarly thin-sliced sweet peppers, tomato wedges, s+p.  The onion absolutely has to be very very thin, <1mm ( I have been so anal as to measure with a vernier), with the occasional mistake permitted.  ;-)  Nuts, berries, olives, avocado, etc, etc, also get tossed in occasionally but not as a rule.

 

 

Rick

post #78 of 81

Reminds me Rick =) - baby spinach can make a good salad if paired with something nice and tart like dried cranberries, and nuts.  

post #79 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurenlulu View Post

OT but speaking of things that should or should not be eaten.. I love nuts and after seeing so many squirrels stuffing their cheeks with acorns I had to try one. I peeled off the outer shell and it loomed kinda macadamia-ish. OMG HORRIBLY BITTER awful awful, worst thing I've ever tasted. Stupid squirrels.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

I vaguely remember tasting an acorn as a youngster. At least they do good things for pigs.

 

mjb.

 

There are basically 2 types of acorns.  The stubby ones that fall from the big oaks we typically see here in the states are loaded with very bitter tannins and must be leached by blanching/soaking to be considered edible by us.

 

Then there are the short bushy oaks that produce longer nuts, and these can be roasted or eaten raw as they are.  These are the kind I believe you find on the Iberian peninsula, famous for its acorn-fed pork.

 

 

Rick

post #80 of 81

Animals will often wait until the tannins are removed by ground water before eating acorns. That bitterness is a warning that they're toxic to some animals until those tannins are removed.

post #81 of 81

As stated a few times previously in this thread, it's hard to beat a good Caesar salad. I would eat one with homemade croutons and extra anchovies with every meal if I could! 

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