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Tips, Help on how to build your own smoker please????

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi, i m from uruguay in south america. This is my first post, and its about smokers.

Im about to build a smoker at home. Im not sure how to do it, saw some pictures in google, have some ideas but not sure if it will work! Has anybody built one? Im planning to do cold smoking. So i thought to use two iron boxes conected with a wide pipe, make fire or smoke in one and in the other locate the product to be smoked...

I hear all kind of ideas!

Thanks


Alvaro Martinez from Uruguay
post #2 of 15

http://thesmokering.com/forum/

 

This website has a great BBQ forum, and many topics with pictures on how to build your own smoker.  There are allot of helpful people on this site, much like here.

post #3 of 15

Ugly drum smoker made from a food grade 55 gallon drum(olive oil etc gets shipped in bulk) http://howtobbqright.com/udssmoker.html

post #4 of 15

Hot or cold smoking?

post #5 of 15

@alvarouruguay,

For cold smoking you don't need a big fire box. Circulation of air is more important. You're just looking for the smoke of your wood or chips, no heat. The heat will produce a bark. During the process you should be able to handle the smoking tray or rack with your hand and it should not be warm and should almost feel a little cool. Maybe 90F

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post #6 of 15

I use a small smoke generator, perhaps 30/30 cm - essentially, you  can cold smoke in a cardboard box with that thing.

post #7 of 15

@GeneMachine,

I have actually looked into the generators a while ago. What do you use for the smoke source? I did not want to commit myself to buying those pellets. I figured I could rig the generator to my existing smoker and use a little battery powered portable air brush pump I have laying around. What do you think?

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post #8 of 15

My system.

 

A hot/cold ( 35F to 185F) PID controlled indoor year round smoker.

 

1. Operating refrigerator for cold smoke in the summer.

 

2. Fully adjustable motorized smoke generator to produce extreme TBS. Very economically in burning pellets. Can operate long period unattended (24 hours plus). 

 

3. Creosote trap (cancer in a bottle) to purify smoke. 

 

dcarch

 

 

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

@GeneMachine,

I have actually looked into the generators a while ago. What do you use for the smoke source? I did not want to commit myself to buying those pellets. I figured I could rig the generator to my existing smoker and use a little battery powered portable air brush pump I have laying around. What do you think?

I am using a ProQ smoke generator, definitely worth the money. For wood, I mostly smoke on beech and cherry. As I said above, you can pretty much put that one into a cardboard box and smoke on :)

 

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post
 

My system.

 

A hot/cold ( 35F to 185F) PID controlled indoor year round smoker.

 

1. Operating refrigerator for cold smoke in the summer.

 

2. Fully adjustable motorized smoke generator to produce extreme TBS. Very economically in burning pellets. Can operate long period unattended (24 hours plus). 

 

3. Creosote trap (cancer in a bottle) to purify smoke. 

 

dcarch

 Did I ever mention that you are nuts in the best possible way? ;)

post #11 of 15

I use the same type of cold smoker as Gene, a proQ.

All you need to find is fairly fine saw dust (which can be a problem).

 

Just a little aside: before you start cold smoking, please make sure you are aware of the risks, especially of what to do to prevent botulism.

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post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by butzy View Post
 

I use the same type of cold smoker as Gene, a proQ.

All you need to find is fairly fine saw dust (which can be a problem).

 

Just a little aside: before you start cold smoking, please make sure you are aware of the risks, especially of what to do to prevent botulism.

Botulism isn't really a problem with bulk meats, I think. I'd be more concerned about E. coli and Listeria. But that's why we cure with nitrite, anyway. Definitely agree that one should read up on the basics when it comes to smoking and charcuterie in general, though. 

post #13 of 15

@GeneMachine

I didn't really want to go into detail as the OP asks about how to built a smoker,not thesafety issues, but felt a little warning was in place.

When I decided to built a cold smoker, I wasn't really aware of any risks. That only came when I started reading up on it (luckily I am sensible sometimes)

With the use of nitrites you should be safe of almost any nasties, just don't smoke without them (unless you smoke at a temperature above 72 oC, but that's obviously not cold smoking)

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post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneMachine View Post
 

 Did I ever mention that you are nuts in the best possible way? ;)

:):):).

 

I decided to deal with a few common problems of smoking food.

 

1. I want to be able to smoke when it is snowing or raining hard outside.

 

2. I want to cold smoke (salmon, cheese, etc.) on the hottest day in the summer.

 

3. I don't want to have to set the alarm clock to get up every hour during the night to tend the fire for long smokes.

 

4. I don't want to keep spending money to buy pellets or wood chips. (I have a problem now, I have enough pellets for the next ten years.)

 

5. I want to have precise temperature control like a sous vide cooker. (the smoker has a convection fan built-in)

 

6. I want to be able to generate a blast of thick smoke for quick smokes or TBS for long smokes without creosote contamination.

 

7. There is also an ultrasonic  humidifier inside to control humidity so that food will not dry out during long hot smokes.

 

8. Being a working refrigerator also, it has very good seal and insulation, the heat source is only a 300 watt halogen light bulb, which uses not much energy.

 

dcarch

 

post #15 of 15

@dcarch MacGyver,

I am impressed with your skills. I wonder what else you've worked on around the house?

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