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Have a look at this recipe from Michael Ruhlman

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Do you think the panko will stick?

 

Quote:

 

Chicken Schnitzel

  • 4 to 8 boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary
  • Panko bread crumbs as needed for coating chicken (about 1 cup)
  • Vegetable oil for pan-frying
  1. Season the chicken with salt and rosemary. Dredge in the panko.
  2. In a large skillet, heat a quarter inch of oil over high heat. When you see currents swirling in the oil, lay the chicken pieces into it, and lower the heat to medium-high. Cook until golden brown and cooked through, about 3 minutes per side.

 

http://ruhlman.com/2014/10/what-if-you-hate-cooking-dinner/

post #2 of 20

That must be the diet recipe for folks who want their breading "on the side".

post #3 of 20

As we know, the Japanese took the bread crumb to a higher level. Schnitzel is something it is recommended to be use with, so yes, I think it will work.  We use it on chicken fried chicken, which is done the same as schnitzel, with good results.

post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by wlong View Post
 

We use it on chicken fried chicken, which is done the same as schnitzel, with good results.

You don't use eggs at all? 

post #5 of 20

@French Fries  Yes, thanks for noting my error on preparation.  I stand corrected, it probably will not stick if there is no egg or butter milk on the chicken before breading.

post #6 of 20

I suppose some of the bread crumbs would stick to the chicken, but probably not many. I definitely don't believe you can get the result achieved on the photograph that accompanies the recipe: 

 

post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 

He needs a better editor. :)

post #8 of 20

Curious. I call this dish "milanesa".  I wander what's it's origin. And always flour.egg.Panko.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #9 of 20
The origin of breaded, fried meat?
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grande View Post

The origin of breaded, fried meat?

 

Yes sir. Schnitzel, tonkatsu or cotoletta alla milanese? The truth and nothing more than the truth.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #11 of 20

The bread crumbs would stick if there were mustard

Quote:
Originally Posted by wlong View Post
 

@French Fries  Yes, thanks for noting my error on preparation.  I stand corrected, it probably will not stick if there is no egg or butter milk on the chicken before breading.

Mustard would be an alternative way to make the bread crumbs stick but, alas... no mustard either.

post #12 of 20

I don't think this is at all what he intended, but most supermarket chicken has been brined and between the brine and myoglobin, if you don't rinse and pat your chicken it could possibly have enough moisture/binder (in the myoglobin) to adhere a decent amount of panko. I seriously doubt that was his assumption though.

post #13 of 20

Of course you all know the bechamel French coating technique (Villeroy) for suckling lamb côtelettes, also perfect with chicken and beef tenderloin. Finesse.

 

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

Curious. I call this dish "milanesa".  I wander what's it's origin. And always flour.egg.Panko.


 I kinda feel like its milanesa when its served with a salad, at least that's how I've always seen it presented.

post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

Of course you all know the bechamel French coating technique (Villeroy) for suckling lamb côtelettes, also perfect with chicken and beef tenderloin. Finesse.

 

 

 

That's the ultimate.

 

With the chicken if it's a bit wet you can coat it with flour and drop it in the fryer.  Works very well.  But panko.  Hmm..

post #16 of 20

I never use an egg wash and the bread crumbs stick okay, sure you lose some to the pan but hey those crunchy bits are tasty to snack on!

post #17 of 20

I use seasoned olive oil mayo as a binder and it works great. 

post #18 of 20
Fine panko probably will work well, coarse not so much.

Blitz it i. Processor use as if flour.

Flour eggwash flour works well too make it a bit thicker.

Definitely probably maybe a typo in the OP recipe in my opinion. Haha
honey dijon chicken sounds good I gotta get off this site In songungrybat the moment lol
post #19 of 20

I never dip fish and have successfully used fine panko.

 

 

Rick

post #20 of 20

I dredge in flour and corn starch then egg and water then seasoned  crumbs.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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