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Pea Soup - Quick Question

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Just started a batch of pea soup.  While dumping in the water, realized I had some chicken stock in the freeze...seems that would enrichen the result like it does for so many other recipes...?  Thought, experiences appreciated...

post #2 of 22
Yes, it can enriches it. But simple is also great.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #3 of 22
I like a little chicken flavor in the background. I usually just throw in my best friend ..chicken base. No matter which way you go it is a great time of year for hot pea soup !!! Good luck and enjoy!
post #4 of 22

I do prefer a chicken stock although I use a store bought stock and in my last batch of split pea soup I used "tuscany chicken broth" from Swanson.. it's the best batch for my tastes I've ever made. You have to be careful about the sodium level since things will cook down and I prefer to also add smoked ham neckbones. So you can cut the stock with water.

 

In the end, if you are adding something like smoked ham parts, and if you do a basic mirepoix to start you'd probably be fine without stock at all. If you like a more delicate flavor, like @Koukouvagia says, simple can be great and you could go for mirepoix with just the peas and water and perhaps a bouquet garni with thyme, bay, garlic, peppercorn, etc.

 

Edited: Changed Progresso to Swanson


Edited by eastshores - 10/18/14 at 10:05am
post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Yes, it can enriches it. But simple is also great.

No question...but I am guilty of slowly complicating the process.  Peas, ham bone, carrot, onion, potato, smoky bacon, salt, pepper...a tsp of beau monde for good measure.  Eventually, I'll come up with more...LOL

post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
simple can be great and you could go for mirepoix with just the peas and water and perhaps a bouquet garni with thyme, bay, garlic, peppercorn, etc.

I'll try all of this, except the garlic...

post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I like a little chicken flavor in the background. I usually just throw in my best friend ..chicken base.

Good deal...next time I'll use the stock.  I will use water before using the store-bought stock, though.

post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by aplomb View Post
 
Quote:
I like a little chicken flavor in the background. I usually just throw in my best friend ..chicken base.

Good deal...next time I'll use the stock.  I will use water before using the store-bought stock, though.

 

Nothing wrong with store bought stock or the jarred soup base (Better than Bullion is my go to brand).

Just read your labels and compare sodium content in the different brands.

I always run out of my homemade before I have enough bones to make another batch (completely sodium free).

Store bought stock is better than no stock at all IMO.

 

mimi

 

@eastshores .... I want to try that Progresso product.

Is it with all the other Progresso soups or with the broth/stock cartons?

 

m,

post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Store bought stock is better than no stock at all IMO.

Exactly right...but, I do like the flavor of mine the best.  But in my pea soup, water is fine.  

 

In other recipes, stock, whether homemade or canned, may be needed.

post #10 of 22
Quote:
 

@eastshores .... I want to try that Progresso product.

Is it with all the other Progresso soups or with the broth/stock cartons?

 

I made a huge mistake! It's a Swanson product. Sorry. It is next to the carton broths/stocks in my store. It's infused with rosemary, thyme, sage, garlic, and lemon. It's labeled "Tuscan Chicken flavor infused broth"

 

On a side note, watching "America's Test Kitchen" they talked about various store bought broths. There is little to no protein used in these broths. The one I am referring to, the third ingredient is "Yeast Extract" which is another word for MSG and that more than anything helps to open the flavors. They have no problem with it, because glutamates are responsible for "Umami" but if you want to avoid a stock, you can add tomato paste, anchovi paste, or dried mushrooms and strain .. all are strong sources for natural glutamates and they don't add them in amounts that would influence the flavor beyond the glutamates.


Edited by eastshores - 10/18/14 at 10:08am
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

Store bought stock is better than no stock at all IMO.

I disagree. I never buy stock at the supermarket, it's junk IMO. I would rather use water, and as was suggested earlier, I'll sometimes throw in a bay leaf, some thyme, some smashed garlic, black peppercorn etc.. or sometimes... just use plain water. I prefer it to store bought stock. Sure, store bought stock will have more flavor, it's just not the kind of flavor I'm usually looking for. 

 

I do however buy demi-glace, mostly for steak sauces, but also sometimes I dilute it to create a stock... but yeah not for pea soup. I don't buy that at the supermarket though, can't find it there, I usually buy it online, the "More than Gourmet" brand. 

post #12 of 22
I use a swanson's stock too: "natural goodness- 33% less sodium." It's not bad- no really, it's not bad. I use it for background- in beef stew, braised chicken dishes, chicken and dumplings. But for a sauce or a reduction, I wouldn't use it. And every other store bought stock i've used IS bad.
post #13 of 22
@eastshores Did the Test Kitchen look at stocks at all or just the broths?
I guess it is a dead giveaway if there is no protein present lol... will have to start checking before I choose.
Thanks for the correction on that brand name ...making Wedding Soup this week and thought to see if it would bring anything new to the party.

@French Fries Guess we will have to agree to disagree about store bought stocks.
I admit there are huge differences between brands and carton vs can .
I can sometimes find (organic freezer section) a chicken stock made like I would but it is a rare find at best.
My usual grocery store carries a nice selection of demi ... always have some on hand but never thought to use it instead of the soup base.
So thanks for that tip smile.gif

Just to stay on topic ( smile.gif ) I have to have at least a bit of chicken flavor in the background of my soups, with Pea Soup the exception.
We are just 2 people eating so always have quite a bit of ham leftover.
I remove most of the meat from the bone, make a stock then add a handfull of the meat back in each jar before it hits the freezer.
Mostly use in beans but also makes an awesome Pea soup.

mimi
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

@eastshores Did the Test Kitchen look at stocks at all or just the broths?
I guess it is a dead giveaway if there is no protein present lol... will have to start checking before I choose.
Thanks for the correction on that brand name ...making Wedding Soup this week and thought to see if it would bring anything new to the party.

 

They actually discussed that. What they basically determined was that for labeling purposes there is no difference between stock and broth. They did their taste test too, and funny enough the stock that had the most protein in it was rated as the least appealing of all of the selections. People key in on the glutamates and nucleotides that are really how store bought stocks get their flavor. Better than Boullion ranked second in their taste test.

post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

@French Fries Guess we will have to agree to disagree about store bought stocks.
I admit there are huge differences between brands and carton vs can .
I can sometimes find (organic freezer section) a chicken stock made like I would but it is a rare find at best.
My usual grocery store carries a nice selection of demi ... always have some on hand but never thought to use it instead of the soup base.
So thanks for that tip smile.gif

You're right in that we may not have tasted the same product. I've never bought stock from a can, only from cartons, and tried hard to get the ones with the best ingredient lists, the least sodium, etc.. but still it's such a far cry from homemade chicken stock that I don't bother anymore. I regularly make chicken stock, but if I don't have any on hand I'll use water. Or if it's a chicken based dish I'll use the neck, back and wing tips to make a quick stock. 

post #16 of 22

My biggest need for stock is (no mystery) during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays.

Every year I tell myself I am going to make extra and set aside but of course I never do.

My sister always does the turkey so has dibs on all the extra parts as well as the yummy goodness in the bottom of the roaster.

Last year I hit the store to pick up some stock for my cornbread dressing and the traditional chick soup with homemade egg noodles (noodles on the side... don't ask me why my mom did it that way lol)

The soup could take care of it's own broth (I was hoping) but that still left the dressing.

All that was left on the shelf was the Rachel Ray low sodium chicken stock (carton) at a ridiculous  price.

I was really surprised when I got home and opened it up.

First the color was a deep rich hue (prolly a dye just humor me K?) the aroma was rich and the flavor as well.

Deep deep poultry flavor.

A pleasant surprise, right?

I only make about a gallon of dressing (big family lol) and usually have leftovers.

Not last year tho.

All gone.

Felt kinda nice.

Just sayin' lol.

 

mimi

post #17 of 22

I think it's high time for a few people to start to experiment with different kinds of stock. My grandmothers would turn in their graves when they saw the poor chicks that are now used to make stock. In the old days, chicken stock was made from old hens, never from tasteless 4 week old chickies.

 

Anyway, I grab for these bouillon pastes whenever needed for tweaking quickly a sauce or even to be used in a soup. I have to encounter the first individual that will detect the use of this kind of stuff in my food! These pastes are simply fan-tas-tic and a real must in your kitchen! I'm sure there are multiple choices in any other country. Highly recommended!

 

BTW, soup made with water only? You cannot be serious!

 

bouillon paste

post #18 of 22

@ChrisBelgium I am glad you brought that up (mature yard hens vs juvenile "fryers").

I find it almost impossible to find the former in my go to markets.

Luckily I have stayed semi active with the 4H program in my area.

The kids who are taking a pen of three chickens to the county fair will purchase a ridiculous number of chicks (30-40) in order to have a good choice for the competition.

They force feed them with BUTTER in order to have nice plump breasts (no snickering plz) because that is supposedly what the customer is wanting to see in the meat case.

Getting to my point now.... I will buy a few from one of the kids willing to keep a few for me and feed veg peelings and reg feed until some of that nasty tasting "butter fat" has been metabolized.

As well as letting the dogs chase them around to build up some decent muscle tissue (plz don't turn me in to PETA lol)

When the time is right I pay the kid to "prepare" for the freezer what are now too tough to bake or fry but perfect to stew hens (just cannot bring myself to do this myself #shudder# lol.)

Makes awesome stock.

 

mimi

 

# my now fully grown daughter with a family of her own was in the swine program.

The piggies we chose for her projects were from award winning mommys and daddys and let me tell you.... that genetic pool was prized for the long lean look with nary a sign of a "humpy back" (the sure tell sign of an inferior animal lineage which translates into "the back in the day nasty freakish fatty bacon producing hogs".

In other words long and lean.... she fed with a high protein, low carb and fat mix of grains and "additives" and took her "projects" for a long walk everyday to build up that lean muscle tissue.

She would always have three and take one or another to the various "pre shows" just to get the judges comments.

Then she would choose which one to take to the fair based on those comments.

We of course would "feed up" the other two for slaughter and freezer butchering.

The flavor was always spot on but the lack of fat was hard to deal with.

Ground most up for sausage (added nice fatty store bought pork roasts in with the mix) and smoked the rest for "ham stock".

 

Sorry such a ramble just had to get those rants off my chest (which sadly never gets any plumper despite all the butter I eat)  :lol:.

 

mimi

post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post
 

BTW, soup made with water only? You cannot be serious!

I don't understand that comment. Stock is made with water only. It doesn't make a difference wether you make a soup using a chicken stock, or use water and chicken bones when you're making the soup, in fact I'd argue that the latter will yield a better result since you haven't frozen or otherwise held the stock. For example, I make minestrone with water only, but I do like to add a ham hock or a piece of cured pork belly and an old parm rind, some herbs, aromatics, garlic, etc... 

 

But even then, many soups are made with water only. Sometimes I like the depth of flavor and complexity that the chicken stock adds, to create layers of flavor, but other times I'm looking for a subtler, cleaner flavor, and I don't want the taste of the veggies to be muddied by chicken stock or any other stock. 

 

I know that, like me, you enjoy studying how the experts do it. Well many 3 michelin star chefs in France would rather use water than chicken stock for many different styles of soup. In fact there was a whole trend in France that started a few years ago to stop using stocks for everything and start experimenting with cleaner tastes. Bernard Loiseau's famous potato and leek soup is made with potatoes, leeks, butter, salt and water, nothing more. Of course, you better research the absolute best quality leeks, potatoes and butter. But I know I'm not teaching you anything here. :)

 

In a symphony, sometimes you need 40 violins plus cellos, double-basses, oboes, clarinets, horns and piano playing complex counterpoints, but at other times you need a single violin playing a simple melody.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post
 
I grab for these bouillon pastes whenever needed for tweaking quickly a sauce or even to be used in a soup. I have to encounter the first individual that will detect the use of this kind of stuff in my food! These pastes are simply fan-tas-tic and a real must in your kitchen! I'm sure there are multiple choices in any other country. Highly recommended!

Yes, we have equivalent pastes here, I'm thinking of the Better than Bouillon stuff that's pretty good, but still unfortunately loaded with salt, so you have to be careful when using it. Still, I have a jar of it in my fridge and use it once in a while (it keeps forever). 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

First the color was a deep rich hue

Haha for a second there I read "deep rich blue"! :eek: 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

I only make about a gallon of dressing (big family lol) and usually have leftovers.

Not last year tho.

All gone.

Felt kinda nice.

Just sayin' lol.

I'm sure I would have loved it as well. There's the ingredients I like or dislike as a cook, but then there's dishes made by someone else with ingredients that I may not like to use myself but still make the final result taste delicious. 

 

For example I'd never use frozen veggies to make a soup, because I prefer to work with fresh ingredients. But I wouldn't be very surprised if one day I taste someone's soup and find it absolutely delicious, only to learn later that some frozen veggies were used in the making of said soup. 

post #20 of 22

For a lot of background and expertise, take a look at the website of

 

Pea Soup Andersen's

 

They've been serving pea soup in Buellton CA for generations and know something about it. They also offer their recipe, which may or may not be complete ;)

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
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post #21 of 22

This thread that started out with a simple question about pea soup has turned into an interesting and informative back and forth about to stock or not to stock.

IMO this thread is one of the reasons Chef Talk has remained pertinent to the F&B industry for all these many years.

The unspoken *yes if you must go OT please stay close to the original topic and keep it civil and clean*

I really enjoy the fact that members can agree to disagree without letting emotions and tempers get out of had and explode on computer screens all over the world.

OK I am exaggerating the previous statement but yall get what I mean lol.

 

Carry on.....

 

mimi

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeLM View Post
 

For a lot of background and expertise, take a look at the website of Pea Soup Andersen's

I had a look. 

 

Quote:

Product Description

 The “Original” Split Pea Soup is Fat Free, 100% Vegetarian (...)

Guess that means their original recipe doesn't involve any kind of chicken stock or ham hocks or bacon... while they sell newer versions that do use bacon... I'm sure both are very good, albeit different tasting, and I probably would use one or the other depending on what other dishes I'm serving during that meal. 

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