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Chicken and Steak marinade

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Im trying to come up with my own chicken and steak marinade. I would like for it to marinade 5+ hours to over night. So i guess im just looking for opinions on what i should use.

 

So far i want to use BBQ sauce, Honey Mustard, Olive Oil, and also some spices which i haven't figured out yet.

 

What is your opinion on this recipe that im trying to start? Also what should i add or take away.

post #2 of 11

I avoid sugars (bbq sauce, honey mustard) for marination as they scorch too easily in cooking.  As another general rule, I wouldn't use the same marinade for both steak and chicken as I think they each are accented best by different flavors. Thirdly, steak is usually best unmarinaded, with just salt and pepper. 

 

Having said that, the flavor profile I'd go with that works well  on both chicken and beef is Lemon, Garlic, and Rosemary.  While that may sound a little out there for beef, think of Tuscan steak, bistecca fiorrentina.

 

If you want to stick with barbecue sauce and mustard, I'd recommend looking at a mustard barbecue sauce. Less sweet than most and you could build it with the LGR flavors fairly easily. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 11

BBQ sauce & honey mustard will burn as soon as it hits the fire. Bad idea.

A good quality cut of meat does not need to be marinated, let the flavor of the beef be the star. Season with salt, pepper & granulated garlic then hit the grill.

Chicken can benefit from a marinade. This is my go to marinade for the last 20 years.

 

Cilantro, fresh lime juice, chili flakes, garlic, olive oil, salt & pepper. Let sit several hours to over night, grill over coals, right next to that steak.

post #4 of 11

BBQ sauce and honey mustard together is a little overkill in my opinion.  I don't think they compliment each other well enough to do it.  Plus, if you're using store bought brands you're just drowning a perfectly delicious piece of meat in sugar, salt and ingredients you can't pronounce.  

 

For chicken you can marinate in buttermilk that has been seasoned with whatever you like, herbs, spices etc.  I'd go with garlic, onion powder, dried thyme, rosemary, or sage, and plenty of cayenne.  Or you can season it with mustard too.  Only do it for a few hours though, the buttermilk can really break down that chicken into mush.

 

For a steak I don't know, I prefer dry rubs myself.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by phatch View Post

 

Having said that, the flavor profile I'd go with that works well  on both chicken and beef is Lemon, Garlic, and Rosemary.  While that may sound a little out there for beef, think of Tuscan steak, bistecca fiorrentina.

 

 

Lemon garlic and rosemary for a steak?  I've never done it.  How does it do sitting in lemon juice for so long?  Does it change the texture of the meat?  And then do you grill it or pan sear it?  I'm up for trying it since lemongarlic is my middle name.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 11

For the tuscan steak, the lemon is added at the end as a finishing touch. For a marinade, I'd use mostly zest and not so much juice if any. If I had any, I'd use lemon olive oil too. And this is a time I'd consider lemon pepper as well. Different ways to provide the lemon flavor.  I've not made lemon olive oil in a while and I really should. 

 

I do make a LGR salt too. That's quite good just used to season a whole chicken and roasting it. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 11

In Portugal, I would have my steak rare which was almost a blue, and sprinkle some lemon juice on it with a little salt-and-pepper and have it with mustard on the side in the many fine and relatively inexpensive informal restaurants in  Lisbon , or Estuarial (bad spelling ) Cascais . Slightly off subject but made me think of it , interesting part of my life. 

I do agree that  steak is best eaten simply. I will try some chopped or sliced raw organic garlic as it is so good for you anyway.

Speaking of chicken and steak, a butcher in Queens NY, suggested I try a chicken steak for its inexpensiveness and value for money  . Worst piece of goddamn meat I ever had in my entire life. I sautéed it simply like a regular steak and it had an odd flavor, which I find difficult to describe. The only thing this may be suitable for, is cold as hell in a steak salad with lots of mayo and lemon juice and all kinds of other things. My experience ,most of the time, never listen to anybody in Queens.

 

 

Alex   


Edited by AlexB - 10/28/14 at 9:14pm
post #7 of 11
@AlexB then you should probably not listen to anything I say then hehe. But I've come across bad butchers in manhattan too.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #8 of 11


You get what you pay for .

     A chicken fried steak is usually the cheapest cut of beef ,usually trim from the bottom round. Which is pounded or put in a jack machine to tenderize then dipped in flour and pan fried. Served with a floury cream type gravy .Its big in the south. served with grits or mashed taters and collard greens.and . Its a heart attack special

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

@AlexB then you should probably not listen to anything I say then hehe. But I've come across bad butchers in manhattan too.


I would be more than happy to listen to you, many exceptions to every rule.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post
 


You get what you pay for .

     A chicken fried steak is usually the cheapest cut of beef ,usually trim from the bottom round. Which is pounded or put in a jack machine to tenderize then dipped in flour and pan fried. Served with a floury cream type gravy .Its big in the south. served with grits or mashed taters and collard greens.and . Its a heart attack special


You get what you pay for, I'll stick to ground beef. It really was strange tasting meat .:) 

post #10 of 11
I guess I'll be the only one going against the grain (lol, steak pun), but I'm not totally against marinating cuts of beef. I agree that there isn't really a great one size fits all marinade other than the one submitted earlier by phatch. I used to use that one for a bistec that was grilled, sliced, topped with melted Brie and pesto on a baguette.

Anyways, for a steak marinade I really like olive oil, balsamic, soy, honey (yeah I said it), a knock of dijon and aromatics like garlic, shallot, bay, and thyme.

For chx I agree with KK about the buttermilk and various herbs and spices depending on the end focus. You can't really go wrong with that one.
post #11 of 11
Ooh also chimichuri for beef!
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