or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › Help Please! Need to identify truffel or mushroom?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Help Please! Need to identify truffel or mushroom?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204701205311398&id=1274323183&set=pcb.10204701218991740&source=48I was in the mountains yesterday and while walking in a what looked as untouched area of the forest I found this, is it a truffel? Or a mushroom?
post #2 of 17

Truffles are subterranean, so probably a no on that possibility.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #3 of 17

Welcome to ChefTalk.

 

Unless you live in Oregon, I doubt it is a truffle.

post #4 of 17

Looks like a petrified cow patty.

post #5 of 17

That's  black bear scat:rolleyes: 

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #6 of 17

I do believe that panini called it.

 

 

 

 

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #7 of 17

Didn't think of that, sure does look like it.  I have plenty of that around, bears are a nuisance around here.

post #8 of 17

Well it could also be a chaga  depending where you are. You probably would not want to eat it though. Maybe a nice tea or broth.

Did you pull it from a tree? Was there Birch around?


Edited by panini - 10/27/14 at 9:29am
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #9 of 17

Let us know how it tastes, and how you cooked it!

 

Mike  ;)

travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
post #10 of 17

@staceyg, I would like to take back my suggestion on the Changa. PLEASE do not shave, chop, boil, cook, or even taste this with out the identification of a competent professional .

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
I won't eat it! I thought it was bear crap too! But its not, it slices real moist almost like a brownie, and it has a root system, I broke it free of its roots there were a out 5 growing around each other northern mountains of Idaho, elevation roughly 4800 ft. Shady area alot of rotten wood around 300-400 feet red fir and tamarak and spruce trees its real condense and thick they all have same shape narrow starting at the roots then gets bigger like a mini pie pan. Its driving me crazy!
post #12 of 17

Old Joke: 

 

The National Park Rangers are advising hikers in Glacier National Park and other Rocky Mountain parks to be alert for bears and take extra precautions to avoid an encounter.  They advise park visitors to wear little bells on their clothes so they make noise when hiking. The bell noise allows bears to hear them coming from a distance and not be startled by a hiker accidentally sneaking up on them. This might cause a bear to charge.
 

Visitors should also carry a pepper spray can just in case a bear is encountered. Spraying the pepper into the air will irritate the bear's sensitive nose and it will run away.  It is also a good idea to keep an eye out for fresh bear scat so you have an idea if bears are in the area. People should be able to recognize the difference between black bear and grizzly bear scat.
 

Black bear droppings are smaller and often contain berries, leaves, and possibly bits of fur. Grizzly bear droppings tend to contain small bells and smell of pepper.

post #13 of 17
😆
post #14 of 17
Nice set up and delievery Kuan😄
post #15 of 17

Place a 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat. Add the olive oil and butter to the pan. Once the butter melts and starts to foam, add the diced onions and saute until translucent, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms and cook, stirring often, until they have released most of their liquid, about 10 minutes. Add the thyme, oregano, chopped tomatoes, tomato paste and stock to the pan. Bring the contents of the pan to a boil and reduce to a gentle boil. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally until the liquid has reduced and thickened, about 20 minutes. Season with the salt and pepper, and add the basil, parsley and truffle oil to the pan. Stir to incorporate and reserve while you cook the pasta.

Fill a large 6-quart pot with 1-gallon of water and bring to a boil over high heat. Season the water with salt. Place the dried pasta into the boiling water, and stir using a long handled spoon until the water returns to a boil. Cook the pasta until al dente, or until it has a slight chew, about 12 to 14 minutes. Once cooked, remove the pasta from the water and drain through a colander set in the sink. Pour the pasta onto a large platter or bowl, and spoon the sauce over top of the pasta. Sprinkle with the Parmesan and chopped fresh herbs.

Twistfix

post #16 of 17

It could be a species of mushroom like this:

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daldinia_concentrica

more pics here: http://flickrhivemind.net/Tags/concentrica/Interesting

 

interesting read on truffles here: http://www.mssf.org/cookbook/truffles.html

edible truffles can be found in Texas and Oregon in North America

 

Luc H.


Edited by Luc_H - 11/7/14 at 6:25am
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
post #17 of 17

good to check with a mycologist or a mycological society in your area......

You can eat any mushroom once.....

or "there are old mushroom hunters, bold mushroom hunters but no old, bold mushroom hunters"

shroomgirl

cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › Help Please! Need to identify truffel or mushroom?