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post #31 of 48
If a customer orders something not being fully aware of what they're ordering, if they want their order changed then it should be changed. That's what will increase your chances of having that customer come back. I was satisfied with my halibut but what if I was horrified to see fish when I was expecting beef? What's the harm in sending it back and ordering something I'll enjoy? After all I am paying for an experience and would like it to be pleasant within reasonable means.

As far as stupidity goes, name me a field that is free of idiots. They're everywhere, everywhere.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #32 of 48
True, idiots are everywhere, god help those working in retail and lets not even think about those poor souls in law enforcement. That aside......

Of course you as a patron should enjoy your expeirence. Lets say you hated the Halibut and wanted to replace it with a filet of beef. The restaurant of course prepares it and you enjoy your meal. So, do you expect you bill to come with 2 entrees on it or 1? Honestly in any place Ive had control of your bill would come with one entree on it and the company would eat the cost. Figuring that even with dilligent cost controls a restaurant gets ti keep 10% on the bottom line. So they are hoping to god you'll return 9 more times so they can break even. ( as a side note, 10% margine is realky good for a restaurant)
My point is, if I ever do get to it, is it too much to ask that a patron as least try to have an idea as to knowing what they are ordering? Communication is a dialog, the patron is best served by expressing their want and needs and by well trained service personal taking the info, providing feedback and guidence and getting the infi to a skilled kitchen staff to prepare it. If any one of those parts fails then everyone loses.

So no we dont need culinary grads as customers, we need people who want to have a great expierence and can express their wants and needs as customers.

Edit, paragraphs arent my strong point today😀
post #33 of 48

I don't know how to answer that, but I would think that a restaurant would eat the cost of the second meal because they want the customer to have a good experience.  What does a restaurant have to gain by having a customer eat something they don't like, don't want and then had to pay for it?  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #34 of 48
Restaurants need more All Day Breakfast;

for people who dont know what they want or are uneducated and don't care to ask.

Restaurants need more Words I Don't Know.

Charge me more if I don't know what Im getting. Price goes up; words go into another language.

Restaurants need more capital letters on menus.

One word descriptors seperated by commas, only if Capitalized. And exclamation marks!

@Lagom Tell your customer not to worry its not Octopus anyway, its Squid. I am sure that will ease their mind.

Or just batter it and tell your staff to inform customers its a fishy onion ring.... Educate them good and they won't send it back.

Menu could read like this:

Battered Calamari!

Octopussy, Fried, Seasoned, Sauced!
Tastes like an Onion Ring Kinda. At Least Looks Like One.
$24

If you believe anything you see on the Discovery Channel we will all be eating Humbolt Squid soon.

True story I fed Calamari to my girlfriend and a friend once after work. We were in an upscale hotel bar after I got of late shift. They were loving that squid. Until I said what it was haha. They didn't eat anymore. She married me anyway.
I'll stop now as I am being ˌästənˈtāSHəs/
Or am I?
All in fun.
Carry on.
post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokjel View Post
 

More restaurants need:

To let the vegetables shine. Not speaking on behaf of the vegetarians now. The plate doesnt have to be vegetarian, but the vegetables need to be thought of something more than just something that have to be put on the plate. 


(LOL) In many places, the vegetable is the last thing thought of and it looks like it.

 

Many places are still using that old and tired "California Blend" brand of frozen vegetables.

Many places don't know how to cook fresh vegetables, as they are either too overcooked, or the fancy pants cooks who make the vegetables "al dente" and are too hard to chew.

 

It seems that only high end or fine dining places utilize fresh vegetables. This may be a generalization but it seems like you really have to look hard for these  places

post #36 of 48
@Chefross I've never once come across a California blend at a restaurant. Maybe it's because I live in NYC but or gone to restaurants of all price points and I'm pretty happy with the use of veggies.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #37 of 48

I had a patron order Blackened Redfish. When it was served she did not want it because she did not like the color?  What would you do????

 

I had one order fried onion rings. When served they did not want them because they were deep fried?????

 

I-had one order Manhattan Clam chowder, When served he refused it, claiming he had it in another place and it was white??

 

One customer asked if the jell'o on the menu was made with filtered spring water?/????

 

A customer wanted to know if we used organic mushrooms in our soup.???

 

It's a B    dealing with an uninformed public.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #38 of 48
Ideally I would go to the table and ask/ offer suggestion. Hope they don't complain anymore and don't
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

  What would you do????
come back. Eat the loss. It happens a few times daily. If really busy ask the server what they want and tell them to hurry up. Advise server to take charge off bill.

Employees need to be empowered to make customer happy. Try not to dwell on the one cranky patron and keep cooking...
post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

@Chefross I've never once come across a California blend at a restaurant. Maybe it's because I live in NYC but or gone to restaurants of all price points and I'm pretty happy with the use of veggies.

 

Consider yourself lucky.  Chopped up brocolli, cauliflower, carrots.  :)

post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post
 

I had a patron order Blackened Redfish. When it was served she did not want it because she did not like the color?  What would you do???? If the dish looked really unappetizing to the customer then whisk it away and make something else, making sure that the waiter takes extra care to describe the dish in its entirety.  Like how they do at chain steak restaurants when you order your steak medium rare they warn you "that's a warm red center, is that ok?" just to make sure you know what you're getting yourself into.  If the customer again does not like the second dish inform her she is welcome to order anything on the menu but she will have to be charged for the dish she did not want.  

 

I had one order fried onion rings. When served they did not want them because they were deep fried?????  Same as above.  When a customer gets irrate it's important to treat them like a 2nd grader in terms of describing the dish to them.

 

I-had one order Manhattan Clam chowder, When served he refused it, claiming he had it in another place and it was white?? That's totally legitimate and it happened to me!  I'm sorry, I had never come across clam chowder that wasn't white and when it came out I was really baffled and I truly did not want it.  

 

One customer asked if the jell'o on the menu was made with filtered spring water?/???? You answer yes

 

A customer wanted to know if we used organic mushrooms in our soup.??? You answer truthfully.

 

It's a B    dealing with an uninformed public.

 

Those last 2 questions does not mean you have an uninformed customer, it means you have a customer who wants to know what's in his/her food.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #41 of 48
Why are you telling is to tell the truth about organic mushrooms but lie about spring water *confused*
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grande View Post

Why are you telling is to tell the truth about organic mushrooms but lie about spring water *confused*

I was trying to be funny, didn't work. Be truthful, it's the best way. This reminds me of a time that one of my friends got a job waiting tables at a very fancy restaurant. He told me that all the coffee they served was decaf regardless of what the customer ordered. They just lied about it.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #43 of 48
The spring water question is one I've gotten, also i'm pretty sure I've had "fried-oh-DEEP-fried?" And yhe too-black-black. But my least favorite is peoplwe who want to change their order before they get the food... meaning you waste the item (probably) without even sending it out
post #44 of 48

Lets get back on topic not sure what happened but I think this is a good thread. Just finish the sentence that is all that is asked.My contribution?

 

 

 

More restaurants need: 

"To learn, practice and hone the art of hospitality"

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #45 of 48
"...to value the customers they have and not worry about the ones they never will"
post #46 of 48

" I can't recall seeing a chef out on the floor in years."

 

A long-time friend owns/chefs the well-regarded Prosecco in the River North area of Chicago.  He's out and about the front of the house quite frequently greeting, schmoozing, joking not only the regulars (a lot of Chicago Black Hawks and their wives hang out here) but newbies as well. 

 

You have to consider, though, that he's the most rampant extrovert I've ever known.

 

Mike  :bounce:

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #47 of 48

I see Wolfgang Puck every time I go to Spago. Which is only about once every 5 years though. He comes to our table and talks with us for about a minute, which I think is nice. 

 

Once I went to a restaurant and the chef came to our table to talk with us. Within 1mn of him talking with us, the waiter brought our food, but the chef didn't leave and continued talking with us for about 10mn while the food went cold. I think we kinda had to start eating in front of him and still he didn't get it. 

post #48 of 48
I like doing table touches, but it has to be done at the right time.
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