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White Chocolate

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Growing up my dad taught me to check ingredients inside my ingredients to see how good of a quality it is. Example, what is going into my vanilla extract and butter? How "real" is it? He always told me white chocolate is a fake chocolate and artificial (along with red velvet) , my question to bakers are well is it a fraud? Do you use white chocolate? Do you agree with it? 

“The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude.”- Julia Child 
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“The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude.”- Julia Child 
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post #2 of 4

The 2014 Ferrari 458 spider

 

 

is not truly an araneae, but I still want one.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 4

What's fake?

 

Look, read the ingredients.  Should only have 4, max 5 ingredients: Sugar, cocoa butter, milk powder, vanilla, soy lecithin.  If it's made in the U.S., East Europe, or Asia, run away from it as fast as you can.

 

So, yes, getting back to your question, I use it, for mainly two reasons.  First is colour contrast, I think I've got a few picture tutorials on this site showing how I make novelty figures and such, sure comes in handy.  The second reason is when I make ganaches, and I don't want to overpower the main flavouring (passion fruit, cherry, blueberry, etc).

 

Is it fake?

 

No.  At least not the real stuff.  Cocoa butter is not fake, and it is because of the cocoa butter that it behaves like chocolate. C.B.R.'s (cocoa butter replacements), hydrongenated palm and coconut oils and "regurgitated" oil/fat blends are fake, parraffin is too,and that's what's in many "chocolates" from the US, East Europe, and Asia, and not only the white, but the dark and milks too.  ,

 

Then again, where I did my apprenticeship, every apprentice and employer was made aware that "white chocolate" did not exist  and that fines would be issued for anyone labeling it as white chocolate.  Still applies today, and not only in Switzerland, but in many EU countries.

 

Just read the ingredient list, that's what it's there for.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

What's fake?

 

Look, read the ingredients.  Should only have 4, max 5 ingredients: Sugar, cocoa butter, milk powder, vanilla, soy lecithin.  If it's made in the U.S., East Europe, or Asia, run away from it as fast as you can.

 

So, yes, getting back to your question, I use it, for mainly two reasons.  First is colour contrast, I think I've got a few picture tutorials on this site showing how I make novelty figures and such, sure comes in handy.  The second reason is when I make ganaches, and I don't want to overpower the main flavouring (passion fruit, cherry, blueberry, etc).

 

Is it fake?

 

No.  At least not the real stuff.  Cocoa butter is not fake, and it is because of the cocoa butter that it behaves like chocolate. C.B.R.'s (cocoa butter replacements), hydrongenated palm and coconut oils and "regurgitated" oil/fat blends are fake, parraffin is too,and that's what's in many "chocolates" from the US, East Europe, and Asia, and not only the white, but the dark and milks too.  ,

 

Then again, where I did my apprenticeship, every apprentice and employer was made aware that "white chocolate" did not exist  and that fines would be issued for anyone labeling it as white chocolate.  Still applies today, and not only in Switzerland, but in many EU countries.

 

Just read the ingredient list, that's what it's there for.

That's a good explanation! And that's the reason why I asked on a pastries page, I hate baking and that is why I have no experience in this area lol. 

“The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude.”- Julia Child 
Reply
“The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude.”- Julia Child 
Reply
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