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Roasting question

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I looked around for a thread that answers this, but I didn't find one. If I missed it I apologize for the redundancy.

 

My most recent favorite for a good cheap roast has been the beef eye round. My grandmother used to cook these until they were grey & flavorless so it took me a while to warm up to this, but the following method ahs worked very well. (Yes, there's a question here, but for the sake of clarity I'm including this):

 

1. Preheat oven to 500 F.

2. Give the thing a rub (salt, pepper, garlic, obviously many possibilities here).

3. Roast 7 min per pound. (3lb. = 21 min.)

4. Turn off the oven and don't open it until int. temp of roast is 130 F.

 

So, here's the question: If I was going to do two roasts at once ( I have a large enough roasting pan for two 3lb. roasts), how do I adjust the initial cook time before turning the oven off? Do I treat it as a single six pound roast? Or will two 3lb. roasts sear up as quickly as one? Do I split the difference and treat it as a 4.5 lb. roast?

 

I'd simply just open up the oven & look, but opening up the oven is probably not desireable with this method. I'm sure there's a proper name for this residual heat roasting technique but I don't know what it is, otherwise it'd be in the subject box.

 

Any tip appreciated.

Thanks-

Jason

post #2 of 7

Rufus,

The technique you are describing is called "boulangière" although I have not found a good reference other than for potatoes à la boulangière.  A while ago in France (I think), villagers would bring their roast and potatoes to the local baker (boulanger) to place in their oven after the daily bread baking was completed for the day (midday) to take advantage of the residual heat of the brick oven to slowly cook a dinner roast without using the home oven all day (saving on fuel i.e.wood or charcoal).  It would pay to be friendly with the local baguette maker.

 

To answer your question, the cooking rate (speed) for meat using a conventional (convection) oven is mostly dependent on the thickness of the muscle not the overall weight of the meat in the oven (contrary to a microwave oven). So if you have enough room in your oven to easily separate both roast then the original direction will work (no need to double or apply any mathematics to your cooking times). 

 

I would suggest you make sure that your oven is completely preheated, that your meat be well tempered (1-2 hours placed at room temperature) and instead of turning off your oven in the end, set it to low heat (i.e. 150-175F).

 

Hope this helps!

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #3 of 7

For 3 lb eyes I go 7 min/lb then off for 2 - 2-1/2 hrs. depending on who's coming over.  With this method do not open the oven door for at least 2 hrs.  This is a good way to do eye of round as it's really lean.

post #4 of 7

I'll refer you to post #4241 on the what's for dinner thread http://www.cheftalk.com/t/69652/what-did-you-have-for-dinner/4230

I posted these pictures a couple of weeks ago after I roasted an eye round roast.  

 

And here is my method which I have adapted from America's Test Kitchen:

I dry brined it over night. With lots of salt, probably about 4 tbsp per roast

Then I seared it and then I slathered it with mustard and herbs.

Then I put it into a 225F oven until it reached 115 internal.

Then I turned off the oven and left it in there for 40 min until it reached near 125F. It's the only way.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thank you Luc H for answering my question.
J
post #6 of 7

Yw

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #7 of 7

Since both pieces could be from a different animal. I would rely  on a meat thermometer .for rare 120 degrees let sit a while   for well 150

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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