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Japanese knives' advices - Page 2

post #31 of 58
Thread Starter 

Where did you bough your Konosuke?

Maybe I'll find some other brand to look into, or find some of the knives you talk about previously.

I was looking at JCK Kagayaki VG-10 (ES) SERIES, are they good or should I consider other brands?

post #32 of 58
The VG-10 by Kagayaki are good knives. Solid VG-10, well treated. The ones I've seen had an excellent F&F. If you're looking for stainless in that price category though I would prefer the Hiromoto Gin-3. More traditional design, better steel, easier sharpening, better food release.
post #33 of 58

If you do decide to go for a Hiromoto Gin-3, please be advised that availability of Hiromoto knives is limited to stock on hand.  The owner of the company, Futoshi Nagao, had been running a "one-man-shop", and did not have either a son or an apprentice to continue the business.  Since he is 78 years of age, his retirement means that once the existing stock of Hiromoto knives has been sold, then no more will be available.

 

This is not to say that the knives have any fault - they have gotten very good reviews - but that if you want to buy one, then you should make the decision while they are available.

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #34 of 58

That's a shame!  Hiromoto knives are great for the price.  I don't have any anymore but I might need to grab one while I still can.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #35 of 58
Thread Starter 

Does the Hiromoto Dasmascus serie is better than the other series?

post #36 of 58
What makes a knife better to you?


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post #37 of 58
I'm quite sure Mr Nagao knows his VG-10, but a Damascus cladding does not benefit to a blade's performance, sometimes it even makes a blade a bit thicker than necessary. I would prefer both AS and Gin-3 over VG-10 as they have a more regular dulling curve and being much easier to sharpen.
post #38 of 58
Thread Starter 

I am still hesitating between the Konosuke, the Hiromoto and the Kagayaki, unless there are other brand to consider for a super sharp and durable knife wich I intend to cherish and sharpen with all my might.

post #39 of 58

I agree with Benuser about the Hiromoto Damascus.  Besides being more expensive and the VG-10 edge being more finicky to sharpen, it is simply not as good a cutting edge as either GIN-3 or AS (Aogami Super Steel).

 

If I had to make a decision on the 3 series, my choice for sharpness would be the AS series.  My choice for ease of maintenace would be the GIN-3 series.  I personally would not consider the Damascus VG-10 series, unless I intended to keep it unused and either as a display-only knife or as a potential investment (though that last "use" is problematic, what with the large number of Damascus blades floating around nowadays).

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #40 of 58
Thread Starter 

Ok thanks for your advices about the Damascus series, it narrows down my options.


Edited by Shibby - 11/16/14 at 12:35am
post #41 of 58
Thread Starter 

About the sharpening stone which one would you recommend?

I saw that there are some with 2 different faces.

post #42 of 58

Better get a one grit stone.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #43 of 58
Thread Starter 

There are different wet stones (1000, 6000, 8000 etc), which one should I take first?

Do you have a prefered brand for the wet stone?

post #44 of 58
A novice should start learning with a medium stone before going any finer. My preferred medium one is the Chosera 800, which corresponds more or less to JIS1200. A very fast cutter, which is an advantage when you begin. Relatively hard, with a fabulous response though, which means that you can actually feel what you're doing -- right or wrong. A next stone could be a Chosera 2k or 3k. 2k, if you let it follow it by an even finer one, 3k (+/- JIS4000) as a final stone.
My preferred finishing stone is the relatively affordable Naniwa Snow-white 8k.
In Europe these are available with knivesandtools.nl, and their counterparts .de, .fr, .co.uk
Edited by Benuser - 11/18/14 at 2:40am
post #45 of 58

Hmmm...Benuser, not so sure a fast cutter is good for a novice. Could screw up the edge easily in a couple of bad passes.

Other #1000-1200 stones:

 

King Deluxe #1000 (used by Murray Carter).

Bester #1200 (i have it, my favorite).

Chocera Naniwa Super Stone #1000 (i have it, very good but not so easy to work stone)

Naniwa Aotoshi #2000 (also known as Green Brick of Joy).

Arashiyama 1K.

Sigma Power #1000 (was a favourite among sharpeners some years ago)

Shapton Glass Stone #1000 (i have it, i do not recommend it).

Gesshin #1000 Extra large Stone (by Japanese Knife Imports, a big, expensive stone that could last generations).

 

There're many other stones. For the value, the King and the Bester. Just an opinion of course, as there's a love affair between sharpeners and stones that you must learn by yourself.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #46 of 58
Slower cutting stones have their own problems too. More time to round the edges, fatigue, loss of focus. A faster cutting stone is still nowhere near a belt sander or wheel. If a beginner is going to wreck their edge, it will happen on any stone. Luckily there's not so much damage on a waterstone that can't be fixed. It's all part of the learning process.
post #47 of 58
Thread Starter 

In your opinion what is your favorite or the ranking of your favorite japanese Petty knives.

post #48 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post

Slower cutting stones have their own problems too. More time to round the edges, fatigue, loss of focus.

 

Truth. 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #49 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shibby View Post
 

In your opinion what is your favorite or the ranking of your favorite japanese Petty knives.

 

If i had the money i would love this beauty:

 

 

Perfect lenght (in my opinion a petty should not be short) and $246 at Japanese Knife Imports.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #50 of 58
Thread Starter 

On which site can I buy a Konosuke HD2? I did not see a lot of site offering Konosuke's knives.

I am still hesitating between Kagayaki, Hiromoto and Misono.

Regardless of what I am going to choose I think I will buy a Konosuke along 2 wet stones.

If you have anymore advices I will glady read them.

post #51 of 58
Which Misono do you have in mind?
post #52 of 58
Thread Starter 
I do not have a specific series in mind so is you have some advices regarding those it would be great.
For now my goal is to buy at least a Gyuto and a Petty.
Regarding the Misono I saw 4 series between for which I do not know which one to choose: Molybdenum, Sweden, UX10 and 440.
Regarding the Kagayaki I consider the VG-10.
And finally for the Hiromoto I consider the Gin n3 and the AS.
If you need more informations or details do not hesitate to ask me.
post #53 of 58

In terms of a petty the Kono is of course nice.  I'd like to think there were options at 150mm and a lot under $100 that were almost as good, but most of what I see available are rather chunky in profile or too short.

 

 

Rick

post #54 of 58
Thread Starter 

Is Tôshô Knife Art is a good website our should I stay away from it?

I am currently looking at JCK for the knives and the wet stone, but saddly they don't have any Konosuke.

As my dilema is still the same between the Misono, Kagayaki and Hiromoto, I wanted to check if there is a good website offering Konosuke.

But still it's not like I have to get my hand on a Konosuke, but rather finding refine and sharp blades I can keep around for a while.

post #55 of 58

Tosho is good although currently out of stock of all the konosukes I was looking for.  The exchange rate works well for me in the US.  In France, I'm not sure what you'd pay in import taxes and VAT.  Another option is buying from the konosuke website direct. It's all in japanese, but you can find your way through if you translate the webpage in google chrome.  If you email them what you want, it will be faster than through Tosho probably and might be cheaper from Japan than Canada.

 

http://konosuke-sakai.com/contact_en/index.html

post #56 of 58
Thread Starter 
Thank you MillionKnives, I contacted them on the website of Konosuke. They should tell me soon if they can work with a retailer in France in order to send me the knife.
I have another questions regarding JCK:
Are their wet stones good quality ones?
What is the difference in therm of quality, sharpeness etc between the KAGAYAKI CarboNext and the KAGAYAKI VG-10?
post #57 of 58
Both are good knives, but very different animals. The VG-10 have an unusual design, have a good F&F, come -- as usual -- with an edge that will never hold. VG-10 is a great stainless steel, but it takes some time to learn sharpening it. Especially deburring is a bit difficult.
The Carbonext are no truly stainless. Not as reactive as carbons, a bit more sensitive to good treatment than stainless.
They have a more traditional or even basic, boring design. The first batches came almost unsharpened. That seems to have been altered in a positive way. Otherwise, the sharpening of the Carbonext is quite easy.
As you will see so often with Japanese knives, factory sharpening is a weak point: the final customer, or the reseller is supposed to perform it. For the Western market they are sharpened. The youngest apprentice takes it to the grinding wheel for a few seconds, a bit of buffering and done! What you get is indeed an edge, mostly incomplete, often badly shaped and always weak. When properly sharpened and perhaps thinned both can make great performers.
In this price category the last batches of Hiromotos, both AS and G3, could interest you. Both exceptional steels, excellent factory edge, other F&F may in some rare cases require a few minutes of work with sandpaper.
post #58 of 58
Thread Starter 

Hi,

I have just ordered the Tenmi Jyuraku Damascus Petty TD-1L on JCK. I wanted an AS or a Gin 3 but they were both out of stock so I took the Damascus.

 

 

The plan is to order the whetstone as soon as I get some money. I wanted to buy 2 whetstones also on JCK, but I will investigate on the forum to find interesting alternatives if there are.

 

In the near future I might buy 1 or 2 Konosuke directly from Japan, because their shipping fees are quite expensive and a friend of mine is going there so she will be alble to buy them directly for me.

 

Thus, I just wanted to thank you all for helping me finding my first high quality japanese knife.

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