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Good sharpener for heavy duty meat cleaver? - Page 2

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

Phadreus, just out of curiosity, what would someone typically charge for thinning the OP's 8" cleaver?

 

As to the KO, those little belts must wear out pretty quick.

 

 

Rick


I imagine you don't get hundreds of knives done before the belt is shot.;)  It's definitely for the hobbyist sharpener, not for professional high volume work.  I dunno what thinning would cost.  For me it's just part of sharpening.  Anything I can thin with powered gear I do for no extra charge or a very small fee.  But I would emphasis that if the OP is actually using it as a proper cleaver it shouldn't be thinned very much. You gotta keep meat behind the edge for stability and strength.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #32 of 39

Be very careful with narrow and small bell sanders.

 

They can permanently damage your knife.

 

There is a tendency for you to put more pressure on the fast moving narrow belt, and in a fraction of a second, your knife's tempered edge is destroyed.

 

dcarch

post #33 of 39

For thick and heavy cleavers, it is not that critical to have a perfect edge.

 

You can buy an angle grinder to shape, thin, and sharpen the edge.

 

You can find angle grinders as cheap as $20 from Harborfright.

 

Make sure you wear rubber gloves, rubber shoes and plug in a GFP outlet if you use water with an angle grinder, not all grinders are water proof.

 

dcarch

post #34 of 39

I own three cleavers - two are more traditional, but this one I picked up for heavy duty applications.  

 

 

 

 

It weighs 2 lbs. and is a formidable tool with good geometry and excellent edge retention.  If you need to get through say a shin bone, or spine then get a saw.

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post
 

Be very careful with narrow and small bell sanders.

 

They can permanently damage your knife.

 

There is a tendency for you to put more pressure on the fast moving narrow belt, and in a fraction of a second, your knife's tempered edge is destroyed.

 

dcarch


Luckily the KOWS runs at a low speed.  You'd almost have to deliberately try to burn an edge on it.  But good advice when using any powered sharpener.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post
 

For thick and heavy cleavers, it is not that critical to have a perfect edge.

 

You can buy an angle grinder to shape, thin, and sharpen the edge.

 

You can find angle grinders as cheap as $20 from Harborfright.

 

Make sure you wear rubber gloves, rubber shoes and plug in a GFP outlet if you use water with an angle grinder, not all grinders are water proof.

 

dcarch

 

Actually that's just the perfect thing for thinning/roughing the profile of a bone-cleaver, provided you pick up a vise to hold the cleaver.  Or make one from a piece of plywood (the base), some rubber feet, and a 2x4 with a couple long screws, washers and thumb-nuts to clamp.  rag to apply water, just don't touch the edge itself with the grinder, keep 1/16" away or better.

 

 

Rick

post #37 of 39

hi,

the blade from Chef's Mall http://www.chefsmall.net/CCK-Chinese-Bone-Chopper-Bone-Knife-Bone-Cleaver-L?zenid=bca0ca3c7cd74308f38446b94fdca91b seems like i might fit the bill.  the blade is made of 5/16" steel and should be heavy enough to do the work you need done.  you might want to have 2 cleavers, one for chopping thru bones, another for slicing and cutting.   our maybe a sailor's solution, have a nice cleaver to cut the meat with.  get a hatchet to use when you want to cut bone.  trying to sharpen using a bench grinder or an angle grinder will probably just ruin the blade.  i use a belt sander to sharpen with, but a sander and several belts will cost over $150, more than enough to buy a nice cleaver and a camp hatchet for bones.

scott

Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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post #38 of 39
Thread Starter 

Ok noted, thanks.

post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

 

Actually that's just the perfect thing for thinning/roughing the profile of a bone-cleaver, provided you pick up a vise to hold the cleaver.  Or make one from a piece of plywood (the base), some rubber feet, and a 2x4 with a couple long screws, washers and thumb-nuts to clamp.  rag to apply water, just don't touch the edge itself with the grinder, keep 1/16" away or better.

 

 

Rick

 

Also, an angle grinder, the only tool for sharpening a lawnmower blade.

 

dcarch

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