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Bubbles in Hollandaise Sauce

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Anyone else have this problems sometimes?

 

Little tiny bubbles that reduces the smooth appearance of the finished sauce, that kind of makes it looks like it is starting to split but is not.

post #2 of 13

You are just a perfectionist my friend.  But yes, because you can't really do it without a whisk.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
So would you suggest the problem is over whisking?
post #4 of 13

When you are serving it you kinda mix it with your spoon.  Also the butter solids might be causing some of the foaming and bubbles.

 

I don't know, it's just the way it is.  Either that or someone is pregnant, because that's what a broken hollandaise means.

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Have been using clarified butter that has been skimmed. Great now that my hollandaise has turned out to be some kind of tarot reading. One chef I spoke to said that the bubbles should dissipate when the egg yolk is cooked properly but I don't like to risk overcooking the sabayon when I know that it will hold the sauce without making scrambled egg by cooking it further.
post #6 of 13

You put a couple drops of water in it.  You won't overcook it that way.

post #7 of 13

Use a food processor to make your hollandiase.  I put the yolks, lemon juice and a little water in a metal bowl and start whisking them over simmering water, add a little warm butter to get it started, then transfer that to the food processor and let it rip.  It does a much better job of creating a thick, creamy hollandaise than you'll ever get by whisking it by hand.  And no bubbles.

post #8 of 13

I had this problem A LOT when I worked the line in my earliest cooking days.  The solution for me was whisking a little slower, which allowed the eggs to come up to the proper temperature.  I think for me, I feared OVERCOOKING the yolks.  So I would beat them as fast as I could.  By slowing down and allowing the heat to rise appropriately, the eggs thickened and the small, foamy bubbles went away.  Mess with your speed and flame temperatures, and eventually you will learn the sweet spot.  Adding a little lemon juice or water before whisking will help slow the cooking process too.  Best of luck!

post #9 of 13
I was always taught the lemon juice is just to aid the emulsification. are you making it over a flame or en bain marie? In my experience a relatively clean gas burner is alot easier to control than the steam. or in a processor? I've never experienced this but to me it sounds like your sabayon is undercooked. Are you making it traditionally with a bit of water or do you skip that step
post #10 of 13

I think something is too cold--probably the eggs.

 

Try to get everything at equal cool room temp before you start.(Don't be in a hurry to mix. Slow is better. Take your time and enjoy.) Remember that you are combining things that live quite separate lives.

 

(Also, glass or ceramic bowls work better for me than metal--who knows why?)

post #11 of 13

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #12 of 13
@hollandaise....I almost aiways do my hollandaise over a flame( over flame while the eggs emulsify and slighty cook) then pull away from flame to bring down temp and allow sauce to even out the temp. Then back on all the while whisking and "base." tightens up. THEN....whisk in clarified butter. Of course it's gonna tighten up pretty well but try to resist adding H2O of egual temp until absolute nessasary. This way your sauce is guaranteed not breaking.Cover and let rest til service. Then, it's at service time you can add a little more water. Guaranteed!! No bubbles!!
post #13 of 13
traditionally you would add your acid and water first, really making an emulsification of that and then the butter.
Quote:
Originally Posted by billyabe1 View Post

I think something is too cold--probably the eggs.

Try to get everything at equal cool room temp before you start.(Don't be in a hurry to mix. Slow is better. Take your time and enjoy.) Remember that you are combining things that live quite separate lives.

(Also, glass or ceramic bowls work better for me than metal--who knows why?)
Probably because the ceramic and glass bowls are thicker, ergo you have more margin of error with regard to temperature
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