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sharpening stones wetstones ?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Ok so i am about ot buy my first wetstone

i used my first oil stone last week and i was told i was a natural at using a stone.
I was nervous didn't want to screw up my good knives.
but i did great.

 

so now my question is what stones should i get

i have a Michael Bras  Santuko.

I have two shun chefs knifes  both are 8 inch classices on is a standard the other is a western chefs knife 

 

do i want to get a  300/1000 stone or a 1000/6000 stone ?

 

i am looking at these two because they are Shun stones and they are decently prices i think 

the 1000/6000 is on sale for 79 and i get 20%of that 

post #2 of 16
Quote:
I have two shun chefs knifes  both are 8 inch classices on is a standard the other is a western chefs knife 

 

do i want to get a  300/1000 stone or a 1000/6000 stone ?

 

i am looking at these two because they are Shun stones and they are decently prices i think 

the 1000/6000 is on sale for 79 and i get 20%of that 

 

I was just going to post this exact thread. I'll be lurking in the shadows looking for the same info through you...

post #3 of 16
I would just look at king norton or bester if you're starting out... They are alot cheaper, you can get two full sized stones for what you're paying for one shun combo. Lower grits are really only appropriate for removing ALOT of material quickly, ie, if you chip your edge badly or want to reprofile your knife
post #4 of 16

The shun stone is absolute crap, any $40 waterstone is better.  For short money get the 5pc kit from CKTG.  Contains Beston 500, Bester 1200 and 'Rika finisher.  The 500 will come in handy for thinning your naturally chunky shuns.

 

Actually for just a bit more it is super well worth getting the 3 stone set from JKI.

 

 

Rick

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

I am trying to find the JKI kit but i cand find it can you sent a link to it is it a oil stone or a wet stone kit ? 

post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

The shun stone is absolute crap, any $40 waterstone is better.  For short money get the 5pc kit from CKTG.  Contains Beston 500, Bester 1200 and 'Rika finisher.  The 500 will come in handy for thinning your naturally chunky shuns.

 

Actually for just a bit more it is super well worth getting the 3 stone set from JKI.

 

 

Rick

ok i am not two familair is the higher the number the better one for me to use like are you saying a 1000/6000 would be bad for my knife ?

i need something lower like a 300 i am conffused 

post #7 of 16

For synthetic water stones, I think of it like this:

 

Low grit stones 200-400 grit -  Used for removing metal fast.  You'd use this for thinning, repairs, and setting bevels quickly.

 

Medium grit stone 1000-2000 ish -  This is what you should use to sharpen most of the time.  If you're happy with your edge bevel angles and just want to take out small chips, and reveal a fresh edge

 

Higher grit 5000-6000  -  This is to refine the scratches made by your medium grit stone.  It will start getting more polished and shiny.

 

 

Some people use 3k-4k range in between and others will keep going into even higher grits.  For double bevels, I stop around 5-6k.

post #8 of 16

The grit range is fine, what I am saying is the shun stone itself is crap.  Too small, and the one I have wasn't glued together all that well and is full of impurities.

 

 

Rick

post #9 of 16

@Thumper1279 probably this kit http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/sharpening-supplies/naka-toishi-medium-stones/gesshin-stone-set.html

 

These stones don't have a base so you can use both sides.You'll want something like this http://www.amazon.com/Steelex-D1091-Sharpening-Stone-Holder/dp/B0000DD21Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1417029936&sr=8-1&keywords=stone+holder 

for knuckle clearance unless you're using a sink bridge over the sink.  Really you could put a 2x4 across the sink and put a towel over it for friction.  

post #10 of 16

Yah wider longer stones will make sharpening SO much easier.

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

@Thumper1279 probably this kit http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/sharpening-supplies/naka-toishi-medium-stones/gesshin-stone-set.html

 

These stones don't have a base so you can use both sides.You'll want something like this http://www.amazon.com/Steelex-D1091-Sharpening-Stone-Holder/dp/B0000DD21Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1417029936&sr=8-1&keywords=stone+holder 

for knuckle clearance unless you're using a sink bridge over the sink.  Really you could put a 2x4 across the sink and put a towel over it for friction.  

yeah i don't have 200 to spend on that kit.

post #12 of 16

The Beston 500, Bester 1200, Suehiro Rika 5000 set is good too.  It's $139 at CKTG with a deburring block and magnifying glass or $135 just the stones from Dave http://www.japaneseknifesharpeningstore.com/Dave-Martell-set-sharpening-stones-p/set2dmcore.htm

 

They all need a soak before use, the 5k soaks the shortest time of the 3.

 

On the cheapest side is the king 1000/6000 combo stone.  It's a smaller stone, and kind of slow cutting for me.  You'd have to pick up a low grit stone eventually, but maybe not for a year or so unless you need to do a lot of repairs.  Small chips you can sharpen out at 1000, just takes a little longer.

post #13 of 16
Is it ok to use china town low grit stones on fine cutlery or would you not chance it? Honestly as a culinary student I think you could probably do fine with just a 2k for now... He doesn't need a polished edge on his knives. Pretty sure you could even get a 2k King stone locally from somewhere for about 40 bucks...
post #14 of 16

I'd have you choose between these 3, the combis are the same size as the shun, less money, better stones

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Japanese-water-stone-NANIWA-combi-stone-1000-3000-whetstone-sharpening-stone-/261339813206?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cd9111556

 

you could also get it in 800-6K

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Japanese-water-stone-KING-KW-65P-800-4000-combi-whetstone-sharpening-stone-/251456821959?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a8bfe9ac7

 

If you are going for a single 2k, or want to add a finer finisher to the above, these are far superior in every way.  The King and one of these in 8K would be sweet to my thinking.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Japanese-Naniwa-whetstone-Chosera-Stone-series-nagura-sharpening-stone-/261309748109?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&var=&hash=item82709b9e10

 

I never finish under 8K, I feel the edge cuts better and lasts longer, but most folks seem to prefer lower grit finishes.  But if you are going to be truing with any kind of steel accept a smooth packers steel, it doesn't matter.  Consider getting a 12" fine Idahone, do not under any circumstances use a grooved steel on you shuns, it will destroy the edge..

 

 

Rick

post #15 of 16
Don't use both sides of a baseless stone. With time, dishing it on both sides will weaken it and cause it to break.
post #16 of 16
Hmm good advice, I'll stick to one side from now on. I've only done this on shapton pros which haven't dished much so I think they're still okay.
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