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The "no knead bread" thread! - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by butzy View Post
 

I made another batch of no-knead bread yesterday (I got a big oven, so it doesn't make sense to do only one)

The ingredients:

6 cups flour (I used 5 bread and 1 wholewheat. I ran out of all purpose)

3 cups water

7 gram salt (the rest will also become grammes pretty soon as I don't particularly like imperial measurements)

1/4 teaspoon instant yeast

 

As said in a post above: I basically doubled a recipe given in the "what's for dinner" thread, without increasing the yeast amount.

 

Mixed it all with a spoon and only did the last bit by hand to incorporate the last bit of flour.

I let it rise for about 18 hours (I think). The temperature was anywhere between 20 and 38 oC during this time.

 

The dough just before baking, not yet in the pot

 

I more or less poured the dough mixture in the preheated cast iron pots and baked for about 30-35 minutes with the lid on and 30 with the lid off.

Just before putting the dough in the pots I wiped (?)  some olive oil around the sides and bottom and put a little maize flour in it as well, but it didn't stick to the sides. I did this as I had problems removing the bread in an earlier attempt.

 

This is the end result.

 

 

I am pretty happy with it, but would like some bigger holes in it.

How would I achieve that?

 

Something else I noticed: The bread doesn't rise that much inside the oven. It stays pretty much at the same level as when it is poured in. Why is that? Do I let it rise too long? Or maybe at too high a temperature?

 

Your dough might be too dry.  A loaf made with too much flour (or not enough liquid – same thing) will be dry, dense, and heavy. Yeast is happiest in a moist environment, feeding happily when it’s got enough to drink. Or it has trouble rising because its top crust was dry. Try to use a clear plastic cap, if you can; you get a better view of what’s going on inside. The elastic keeps the cap firmly anchored to the pan, while the plastic on top “poofs” nicely, sheltering your rising loaf without actually touching it.

post #32 of 46

Thanks @Jaynna, but this is actually one of the wettest doughs I have ever used.

As I said: I don't like amounts in cups etc, so will weigh the flour next time and work out the bakers percentages.

 

The dough rises beautifully inside the bowls, hence my idea that I probably let it rise a bit too long and/or at too high a temperature, which in essence has the same effect.

 

What amount of time does anyone else let the dough rise and at what temperatures?

 

Don't get me wrong: there are plenty holes in the bread and it tastes good. Just curious and wanting an even better bread!

 

 

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post #33 of 46

I see. For me, the best way to tell if the dough has risen enough is not by time—though it helps to set the timer so you don't forget about your dough—but by look and feel. A lean, moist dough in a warm kitchen will probably rise in 45 minutes or less.  A firmer dough with less moisture will take longer to rise. 

post #34 of 46
Finally got around to making another loaf and weighing the ingredients.
The percentage water works out at 85%, so pretty high indeed.
Because of the wet dough, its pretty difficult to judge what state it is in as it stays very sticky.
Anyway, it is in the oven now.
Pictures to follow....

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post #35 of 46

Some pictures:

 

 

Its all the same loaf, just playing around with composition :p

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post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post
 

Thanks! I was wondering since I've only used King Arthur bread flour, has anyone tried with just AP? Would it produce a softer crumb than the higher protein bread flour? I thought on my next batch I'd go with 100% AP to see if there is a swing in how it comes out, then I could play with percentages of AP vs bread flour. I especially like the kind of bread I made last night for dipping in oil with garlic and herbs.. but it has to be fresh out of the oven. It develops a chew once it is cool that can be a little tough to eat.


 I use approx. 60% KA AP mixed with 40% KA Bread Flour at 65-67% hydration and get quite a nice and soft crumb.

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post #37 of 46

You guys need to learn BAKERS PERCENTAGES that I won't go into.  It makes for measuring ingredients a very speedy and convenient affair.  My typical bread is usually:

 

  1. Flour
  2. 67% hydration  Water temperature is between 110F - 120F
  3. 2% salt
  4. yeast:  for an 800g - 1500g dough I use between 1/2 to 1 tsp SAF Red Instant.  Yeast is forgiving and doesn't require weighing.  You can even eyeball the amount of yeast you'll need.
  5. (EDIT) 1/2 tsp diastatic malt per 500g dough
  6. (EDIT) 1 TBS olive oil per 500g dough

 

(EDIT)Sometimes with the dough placed into a banneton/brotform and fully risen, I'll set the setup into the fridge for anywhere from 12 to 24 hours prior to baking.  That's called the retard.  During the retard the enzymes and bacteria can work their "magic" to produce better flavors and more sugars.


Edited by kokopuffs - 12/30/14 at 5:16pm

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post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by butzy View Post

...The percentage water works out at 85%, so pretty high indeed.
Because of the wet dough, its pretty difficult to judge what state it is in as it stays very sticky....

 

If you allow your final proof to proceed uncovered, the surface of the dough will turn slightly dry, very very slightly.  Then slash and place into the preheated oven immediately.  This surface dryness will produce a much better and taller ear that makes your loaf look more attractive.

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post #39 of 46

@kokopuffs:

I will give that a try. Thanks :)

The top of the dough is slightly dry, but since I more or less pour it in the cast iron pot, it doesn't stay on the top, but gets mixed in.

I will try keep it at the top and give it a slash or 2 and report back

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post #40 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 


 I use approx. 60% KA AP mixed with 40% KA Bread Flour at 65-67% hydration and get quite a nice and soft crumb.

 

How long do you let yours rise? I figure that has something to do with the amount of gluten that forms as well.

post #41 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by butzy View Post
 

@kokopuffs:

I will give that a try. Thanks :)

The top of the dough is slightly dry, but since I more or less pour it in the cast iron pot, it doesn't stay on the top, but gets mixed in.

I will try keep it at the top and give it a slash or 2 and report back

 

Learn what's called the french fold aka stretch and fold.  The top always stays on top.  You might also checkout THEFRESHLOAF.com and their website/forums for further info.  I learned a lot there.


Edited by kokopuffs - 12/30/14 at 5:14pm

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post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post
 

 

How long do you let yours rise? I figure that has something to do with the amount of gluten that forms as well.

 

Most texts state to allow the dough to double in size.  What's meant is double in volume.  Assuming the dough is a perfect sphere, it's final diameter (or radius) will measure 1.25 times the initial diameter (or radius).  The volume of a sphere is 4/3 * pi * (radius cubed).  And 1.25 cubed equals approximately 2.

 

Usually the first rise takes about an hour.  I then french fold and allow for a rise taking another 20 - 30 minutes.  The dough is shaped into a ball and allowed to rest uncovered.  It then is given a final shape and placed into a banneton, uncovered, for the final rise which will take another 45 minutes.  Then either do a retard or place into the preheated oven.

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post #43 of 46

My previous post listing baker's percentages has been edited.

 

Also checkout my posts and threads in the baking and pastries forum at ChefTalk.

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post #44 of 46

I was kinda thinkin' that "No Knead Bread" was suppose to be a no-brainer, super-easy, throw together bread recipe for the busy home cook?

post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post
 

I was kinda thinkin' that "No Knead Bread" was suppose to be a no-brainer, super-easy, throw together bread recipe for the busy home cook?

 

It's the only way I make my bread because gluten can form spontaneously.  Not for the busy home cook, no-knead bread is meant for some of those out there (not me, however) who might be burdened with arthritis.  And once mixed, the dough doesn't form into a nice neat boule or batard on its own.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #46 of 46

I took my bread in a different direction and made Pain Italien recipe

from Bernard Clayton's New Complete Book of Breads-Revised and Expanded 

I used to make this bread alot, but for some reason haven't

 

 

 

 

 

I made a half recipe, as I had less bread flour than I thought I did,

but that worked out well.  Two smaller boules.

We had half of one for dinner (chicken cacciatore with rigs, the house smells A~MAZ~ING),

now if I can just keep Dearest Husband's sticky little paws away from the other half, 

we'll have that in the morning.

The second loaf will go into he deep freeze for later consumption.

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