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What is happening to my knife!!?? (How can I get it looking brand new)

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi folks, I'm a newbie but I've recently gotten into cooking and I love it. I found that the cheap knives I had in my kitchen could never hold and edge and would hinder me from cooking at my best or even wanting to cut things in the first place. So I decided to invest in a good knife. 

 

I read a lot of reviews and watched a lot of videos and decided to put some extra money and get a Konosuke HD2 240mm Gyuto. I read that people have had the HD1 version for years with no issues so I thought this would be a good knife to have for long term. 

 

Since I've gotten it, I've washed and dried it with a towel after every use (the water might have been too hot?)

 

. I don't let anyone in the house use it (i hide in my room) and I have done nothing but tried to take absolute care of it. But unfortunately its not looking so good. 

 

I've had the thing maybe two weeks and it has these smudges (which are turning brown.. oh god is it rust WHAT DO I DO!?) and other water-looking marks. Overall it looks very used and worn and I probably don't even have a complete hour of chopping on this thing. 

 

I'm so disappointing and discouraged right now. The knife was $250..a lot for a uni student like myself but I figured I should spend a lot since I may be using it for years. 

 

I was reading of what I could do yesterday and I was told to get something called 'Bar keepers friend' ( a stainless steel cleaner) but it didn't do anything, even while scrubbing with a coarse sponge. 

 

What can I do to get my knife looking like new? 

post #2 of 11
So, your knife is carbon steel, which means that it will corrode & rust. One way to prevent this is to develop a patina; the other way is to be extremely anal about cleaning and polishing it. There is a lot of good info on caring for carbon steel knives on this forum, just do a search.
I just clean my knife with baking soda when i need to get some rust off. Basically, it's a changable material, it isn't static, it probably is not going to look "like new" which is not to say bad. I can't tell from the photos what you have going on, maybe the knife guys will chime in.
Do search the forum for care tips, & when you dry it with a towel, leave it somewhere dry to completely air dry. Try baking soda.
post #3 of 11

It's patina. Let it grow naturally. Learn about wabi-sabi Japanese esthetics and don't worry. Me, personally, i do not use baking soda or BKF. We, the Sect of carbon steel, love patina! It will protect the rusting of the blade, and show the poetic passing of time.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #4 of 11

As I understand Japanese chefs typically polish their carbon knives after a shift by applying buffing compound with a cut-off end of a dacon radish.  In the States the radish would likely be replaced by a potato, for the few who would bother.

 

So we know what you're [unjustifiably] unhappy about, but how does it feel for you otherwise using a knife like that?

 

 

Rick

post #5 of 11

A light coat of oil left on the blade will stop it but typically carbon steel blades do that...

post #6 of 11

Hi Ray,

If you knife is carbon steel , you have to careful , do not wash in the dishwasher. Once you wash it you have to dry it properly . I have been using Mac and shun knife ,Misono, i have not faced any problem . I used to work with japanese guy in paris . he had Sugimoto knife , if you looking for to change knife search for the brand i mention. You can't go wrong. After keening you knife make sure you dry properly.

Sumit

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Do you really want to know, how to solve you knife problem ?

www.healthydietstrend.com


Edited by sumit - 12/14/14 at 5:35am
post #7 of 11

That poor knife ... likely it will get "sharpened" with a butcher's steel too, and have a new bevel put on with an angle grinder.

 

DEar OP, please read up about proper handling, care and maintenance of high-end Japanese gyutos before you ruin your knife.

 

here you go  www.kitchenknifeforum.com

post #8 of 11

The HD2 line is a semi stainless tool steel and it comes with a flat finish so it's not shiny to begin with.  It's not carbon, but it will still take a patina, but that's the nature of the beast.  Get yourself a rust eraser, or use a mild abrasive like baking soda, or BKF.  Just be careful working up and down the blade you can cut yourself badly.  If you want a shiny knife you'll have to sell that one and look for another, or polish it the old fashioned way - one grit at a time.

 

Konosuke makes a great knives - enjoy it.

post #9 of 11

Knife patinas are a sign of your superiority over your stainless steel wielding co-workers. Leave it, so they can marvel at your coolness and tremble with fear every time you enter the kitchen. 

post #10 of 11

Yeah, your Kono is tool steel.  Not like a typical high carbon but not fully stainless.  You're getting patina, not rust.  Not red rust anyways.  I like a little patina, it adds character.  You can clean it off with Comet or Barkeeper's Friend and a sponge or scrubber, then apply food-safe oil.  But I wouldn't and I don't; I have several similar knives and I let 'em patina.

 

Welcome to CT!

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #11 of 11

BTW, Konosukes are awesome!  I only have one (in White steel) but I would love pick up another or two.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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