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Fried Chicken

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

So I'm trying to get fried chicken on the menu of the restaurant that I work at.  But I'm not certain on how most restaurants put out fried chicken. Whether it's cooked ahead of time and then just breaded and fried to be crispy, sous vide, or raw breaded thrown in the fryer.

Any help, suggestions, or recipes would be appreciated.

post #2 of 13

Good fried chicken and proper sides can hold their own against just about anything, bad fried chicken will leave your customers running for the door.

Proper fried chicken will take 12-15 min in your fryer, you need a dedicated fryer or a couple of Large cast iron pans and lots of attention.

It is cooked to order only, and always from a raw state. Never pre cooked, breaded and thrown into the fryer.

Seasoned buttermilk & hot sauce are your friend along with very well seasoned flour.

 

You need to go experience fried chicken done right. If you can't do it good, don't even attempt it.

post #3 of 13

Personally I really like it done sous vide then deep fried. YMMV, of course.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #4 of 13
@chefbuba up until last year I would have agreed with you a hundred percent. I got around to playing with the Momofuko style of fried chicken, which is based around steaming the chicken first. It is really, really good!
post #5 of 13

 There is no secret to fried chicken. It just takes time and a watchful eye.   You will need more than one fryer.  Two is the minimum.  One set at 325F for the breasts, one set at 375F for the other parts.  Use a skimmer and forget about using the baskets that come with it.  Clean the fryer every day.  Filter the oil every day.

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanMcPherson View Post

@chefbuba up until last year I would have agreed with you a hundred percent. I got around to playing with the Momofuko style of fried chicken, which is based around steaming the chicken first. It is really, really good!

Having never experienced Momo fried chicken I stand firmly in the cook to order camp.
Both of my recipes depend heavily upon the bird and flour being well seasoned (plenty of salt) before the overnite ( or all day maybe a good 8 hours) resting period.

One includes an overnite buttermilk bath the other depends on the water that clings to the pieces (sometimes 6 sometimes 8 if I separate the wing from the breast) after washing.
Number two is just a loosely termed brine technique.

Before frying I drain and dredge the pieces in plenty of seasoned flour (3:1 AP and white whole wheat) then allow to rest for a bit .
This rest period gives the flour time to absorb whatever liquid remains after draining the bird pieces (important step as this will be your crust).
I am in the veg shortening camp (dunno why... prolly cuz my Gma Van was lol) so during the rest period bring whatever fat you are using up to temp in whatever vessel you are using.
Sometimes the flour will absorb all of the liquid and look a bit wet so I sometimes plop back into the flour and then shake off excess before popping into my skillet.
Don't crowd the parts and cover skillet until time to turn.
After turning leave the cover off.
This will allow the built up steam to escape and insure a crispy exterior.
Remove from fat and allow to drain on baking rack set over a sheet pan in a warmish to hot oven.
When all done frying, discard most of fat and make gravy with the rest (assuming you used the skillet method).

Kinda wordy but great fried chicken is an art in the south lol.
The above is for family meal..... you will want to use a dedicated deep fryer if cooking to order.

mimi
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post


Having never experienced Momo fried chicken I stand firmly in the cook to order camp.
Both of my recipes depend heavily upon the bird and flour being well seasoned (plenty of salt) before the overnite ( or all day maybe a good 8 hours) resting period.

One includes an overnite buttermilk bath the other depends on the water that clings to the pieces (sometimes 6 sometimes 8 if I separate the wing from the breast) after washing.
Number two is just a loosely termed brine technique.

Before frying I drain and dredge the pieces in plenty of seasoned flour (3:1 AP and white whole wheat) then allow to rest for a bit .
This rest period gives the flour time to absorb whatever liquid remains after draining the bird pieces (important step as this will be your crust).
I am in the veg shortening camp (dunno why... prolly cuz my Gma Van was lol) so during the rest period bring whatever fat you are using up to temp in whatever vessel you are using.
Sometimes the flour will absorb all of the liquid and look a bit wet so I sometimes plop back into the flour and then shake off excess before popping into my skillet.
Don't crowd the parts and cover skillet until time to turn.
After turning leave the cover off.
This will allow the built up steam to escape and insure a crispy exterior.
Remove from fat and allow to drain on baking rack set over a sheet pan in a warmish to hot oven.
When all done frying, discard most of fat and make gravy with the rest (assuming you used the skillet method).

Kinda wordy but great fried chicken is an art in the south lol.
The above is for family meal..... you will want to use a dedicated deep fryer if cooking to order.

mimi

 

The dredging and resting step is so important.

 

So in a skillet?  How far up does the oil come?

post #8 of 13
@kuan. Lol the ability to eyeball the proper amt of fat remains a forever a mystery to me.
My aim is for it to hit the meat at just over the half mark.
I figure it is better to remove the extra already melted fat from the pan than to add cold and risk the temp plummeting.

I cannot parallel park either.
Something about poor spatial awareness lol.

mimi
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

@kuan. Lol the ability to eyeball the proper amt of fat remains a forever a mystery to me.
My aim is for it to hit the meat at just over the half mark.
 

 

I want to apologize upfront as I can be anal rententive, but... the day before frying and before prepping the chicken, select a pot or pan approximating the size of the skillet you will use for frying. Place the chicken in pan and add water to level that you want the oil to be when frying. Proceed to wash the chicken and then remove chicken from water and continue on to whatever prep you select whether it be buttermilk or whatever. Pour the chicken washing water into a measuring cup and viola that is the amount of frying oil needed...I know I know I know but I warned you ahead of time...anal, too much time on hands, and the entertainment center perched on my shoulders won't power down...what can I say :)

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #10 of 13
@cheflayne not anal at all more of a micromanager lol.
The difference is you cared to teach me how to do it.
Expecting you at my door to take the task away from "the idiot who was allowed in the kitchen" is more anal I think.
That is a great tip and I thank you (bowing deeply and with an air of gratitude ;-)

mimi
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post


Expecting you at my door to take the task away from "the idiot who was allowed in the kitchen" is more anal I think.
 

 

So I should turn the car around? :crazy: 

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #12 of 13

 

I'm a fan of Chicken Katsu as 

our version of Fried Chicken, I make

mine with mochiko flour, eggs, and

panko, shallow fried 375⁰

this dish holds very well or cooked to order

quite quickly, delicious!

post #13 of 13

Wow that looks really good Ill have to try that

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