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my loaf won't expand after rounding but not in the first proof period after kneading

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi

 

I am still a newbie in making bread

So the two things I want to learn first are the dull and the rate of expand

 

As a newbie I try to make a bread dough with the following receipt:
1. Mixing 200 grams of high protein (13% - 14%) flour - 40 grams of granulated sugar - 4 grams of salt by kneading

2. adding the water into it bit by bit until the dogh is a little bit dull

3. adding 5.5 grams of instant dry yeast into it until the dough is 100% dull

And after that I left the dough stayed in the plastic bowl for about 2 hours

Fortunately here in Indonesia the temperature is 24 degrees C and I do not have any proofer box

 

The dough can rise as I want but it takes longer and I do not know why

After rounding the dough won't expand as expected eventhough I let it stay for 8 hours even more
it is so slow

I do not know why

As you know that I roll the dough before rounding

 

The appearance of the dough after rounding as follows


 

Seems that I have to learn more about rounding

Hope for your help chef


Edited by deniagpam - 12/5/14 at 5:55am
post #2 of 12

I suspect that your yeast is no good.

post #3 of 12
Try adding the yeast and a bit of the sugar to the water and let it proof before introducing it to the other ingredients.
Wakes it up and brings it back to life before starting on the job you are asking of it.
I don't know the exact science but salt can inhibit and/or kill yeast.
Lots to be read with a simple Google search.

mimi
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

okay

Thanks for all your answers

I think I added too much salt

I will try adding 2 grams of salt

and let see what will happen

post #5 of 12

Seam side down.  :)  Gather all the seams, oil your pan, and put the seam side down on the pan.

 

The other thing is you need to monitor your dough temperature.  

 

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/dough-temperatures.html

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi thanks for your answer

as you know that I had done all you suggested long before

but stayed the same

 

when I touch my dough it feels cold and the surrounding air temperature is cooler than usual

my town is covered by cloud all day long since it is rainy season

 

I am planning to add another ingredients like shortening - milk - bread improver

I google it and get that the ingredients strengthen gluten protein in the dough so that CO2 gas will easily be trapped inside the dough and make larger volume


Edited by deniagpam - 12/6/14 at 5:47pm
post #7 of 12
Are you following a recipe or just making things up as you go along?
I am no stranger to yeast leavend products like kolaches and other sweet pastries and can turn out a pretty good loaf of bread ( using both the kneaded as well as the non kneaded techniques) and your actions have left me puzzled.

Would you mind sharing how you are coming up with your tweaks?

mimi
post #8 of 12

All you need for bread is flour, water, salt, and yeast.  There's no need for any sugar, and certainly not for the huge amount of sugar you are using.  I would get a basic dough working before adding a "improvers."  

 

You do need good yeast - have you proofed it?  Put a little in some warm water, wait ten minutes, and see if it bubbles up.

 

Dough will rise at low temperatures, just more slowly.  That's not your problem.

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

hi Colin

 

Do you have any whatsapp or BBM number so we can talk more about making bread deeply ?

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by deniagpam View Post

.....1. Mixing 200 grams of high protein (13% - 14%) flour - 40 grams of granulated sugar - 4 grams of salt by kneading.....
hi Deniagpam,
 
do I interpret this part correctly that you add salt to the dough as you knead it or knead it into the dough?  Do you do the same with the sugar?
If yes then crystal salt will in fact kill or deactivate your yeast.  You should dissolve the salt in your flour at the very least so it is well dispersed.  Crystal sugar will do something similar.
You can activate the yeast rapidly if you completely dissolve 5g of sugar in the warm water then add your yeast and let it proof (i.e. let it make foam) before adding to your flour-salt mixture. (no need to add that much sugar to the dough unless you are looking at making a sweet dough).
good advice all around in this post.
Good luck,
Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #11 of 12

The temperature of water that's added to the dough should measure at least 110F.  Once mixed, the water will cool a bit.  Your dough should feel slightly warm to the touch after everything has been mixed.


Edited by kokopuffs - 12/30/14 at 1:47am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #12 of 12
Here my suggestion...

If you are only using 200 grams of flour you're going to have a small loaf.

I would mix in your flour, yeast and water all at one time. Mix it just a very little until it has that shaggy look. Let it rest/autolyse for 20 minutes. Then add the salt and sugar and knead them in the let itrest again for 20 minutes.

Note: if you're making regular bread the sugar does not belong in the recipe.

Most breads like this have a 70 to 80 percent hydration rate so if I were you I would measure out 140 or 160 grams of water and see what works for you so after you learn to make this bread you get the same exact results each time.

After the 20 minute rest then start doing stretch and folds. Google "stretch and fold bread dough". It works much better than kneading and it's a lot less work. It will develop your glutton strands much better than kneading does. You will need to do about 4 stretch and folds let it rest for 20 minutes each time.

Now your are ready for final shaping... Google bread shaping and tension tugs. The tension tugs will tighten you boule up real tight so you will get a good oven spring.

Try that I think you will get good results.
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