or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › How do you grill a lamb breast?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How do you grill a lamb breast?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

I just got a lamb breast - it looks like a rack of ribs. Never cooked one before. I'm thinking of making a rub with cumin and coriander, maybe also marinate in olive oil, crushed garlic and lemon juice for the last few hours? 

 

How about the grilling itself? Slow and low? Like 300F for an hour or an hour and a half? 

post #2 of 28
Thread Starter 

Well I guess I'll do it pretty much the way I described, indirect grilling at 275F for about 2 hours - unless someone has a better idea. I'm also thinking of doing the marinade overnight for convenience-sake (don't want to have to deal with it tomorrow except for putting it on the grill). 

 

I'll have a few people over, this is gearing up to be a mediterranean-style dinner so I'll also grill a whole butterflied chicken (slow-cooked as well with oregano and herbes de provence, olive oil and crushed garlic), a piece of top sirloin (probably going to keep this simple, olive oil, garlic, S&P, maybe a little chili) and some Salvadorean chorizo (not exactly mediterranean, oh well). Served with a large bowl of tzatziki/skordalia and hummus with grilled pita bread, and I'll grill some potato slices with fresh rosemary. 

 

:)

post #3 of 28

Sounds great FF, I would want to make sure that it doesn't out. Indirect heat is the way to go.

Your serving the very things I enjoy. With your skills on the grill , I have no doubt it will be an eventful and enjoyable evening. 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post
 

I would want to make sure that it doesn't out.

doesn't.. dry out?

 

Thanks Petals. As long as said skills aren't impaired by the libations and discussions... I guess that should be alright!! :lol: 

post #5 of 28
Why not high heat?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thanks for stopping by @Koukouvagia ! I was thinking low heat because I recently did beef back ribs with low heat and they cam out tender... thinking that there must be some fat and connective tissue in the lamb ribs as well, so for the same reason, cook them low heat on indirect heat... but I'm not sure, since I've never cooked them before.

post #7 of 28
I must not be familiar with this cut then. I thought you said it's a rack of lamb?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 

It was labeled a "lamb breast". It looks just like a rack of pork spareribs, but a bit smaller. It looks just like that: 

 

post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 

Well about 2 hours at 300F did it and it turned out great. The meat was tender and quite moist. There was a lot of fat but it was yummy. The most difficult part was to cut the ribs.. that was quite a tough job. I wasn't expecting that! :)

post #10 of 28
Any pics?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 

Unfortunately no pics. It's enough having to man the grill, make sure nothing burns, entertain the guests and keep the kids from killing each other... no time for pictures!! ;)

post #12 of 28

I'm glad it worked out though.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucyhank View Post
 

it will be best to hvae it with a  syrup of corn i guess

:eek:

post #14 of 28
Did you french or split the ribs? That's a great find, do you have an immersion circulator FF?
post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 

No immersion circulator here. 

 

I did not French the ribs, I cooked the whole rack then proceeded to separate them as best I could, but they were so tightly attached together on one end that I had to resort to a bigger knife to cut through cartilage. 

post #16 of 28

Sounds like a St. Louis cut with the cartilage running perpendicular to the ribs.  I never see lamb breast, but I can get veal breast any time.

 

That reminds me I have a full rack of venison ribs in the freezer.

post #17 of 28
post #18 of 28

Using the picture posted previously, my International Meat Manual published by the U.S. Meat Export Federation list it as a "Ribs, Breast Bones-Off" sometimes referred to as "Denver Style" ribs.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

Sounds like a St. Louis cut with the cartilage running perpendicular to the ribs. 

That's exactly what it looked and felt like. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

 "Ribs, Breast Bones-Off" sometimes referred to as "Denver Style" ribs.

Thanks for that info - but this one had the bones in. 

post #20 of 28

Denver style, St. Louis cut. You colonials seriously confuse me.... ;)

post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Thanks for that info - but this one had the bones in. 

The bone off part is not talking about the rib bones, rather the breast bones. It basically is a cleaned up breast with the rib cartilage, elbow bone, sternum, diaphragm, surface fat, etc removed. In the chart below you can see the "breast" cut in the upper right hand corner and the "ribs, breast bones-off" cut in the lower left hand corner.

 

 

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

The bone off part is not talking about the rib bones, rather the breast bones. It basically is a cleaned up breast with the rib cartilage, elbow bone, sternum, diaphragm, surface fat, etc removed. In the chart below you can see the "breast" cut in the upper right hand corner and the "ribs, breast bones-off" cut in the lower left hand corner.

 

Ah ok I understand. Thanks for all the information. It's always a bit challenging to me to picture exactly where a cut comes from on the carcass. 

 

So those ribs would actually be the continuation of the bones from what's labeled "back" on your drawing, which is made of what we usually call a rack of lamb, which we can cut in lamb cotelletes / lamb chops? 

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

So those ribs would actually be the continuation of the bones from what's labeled "back" on your drawing

Yes.

 

In this picture, the back is numbers 2 & 3, with 2 being the rack and 3 being the loin. The breast is number 6.

 

f3-14.gif

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 

Great, thanks!

post #25 of 28
Very informative, thank you chef
post #26 of 28


This is good stuffed and roasted. It used to be one of the cheapest cuts of most all meats.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #27 of 28
Veal breast is also very good stuffed & roasted.
post #28 of 28

It sure is I should snag one next time I'm at that store.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › How do you grill a lamb breast?