or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

A promising idea?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

http://www.eatwith.com/

 

They've got no one in Salt Lake City. If I sent them a picture of my kitchen and dining room, they'd keep it that way :-)

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #2 of 23

Same here! lol

post #3 of 23

Interesting.

 

Quote:

The company pre-vets all hosts to ensure that they’re not only good cooks, but that they also are friendly and have the skills necessary to get along with and host strangers in their home. According to Michlin, there are three main “ingredients” it looks for in a host: the ability to host and communicate; ability to cook; and the ambiance of their home. Each host’s home and menu is reviewed before being added to the platform.

Of hosts that apply, only about 4 percent make it on...

Source: http://techcrunch.com/2014/09/18/eatwith/

post #4 of 23

My home has no Michlin stars... lol

post #5 of 23
I will admit to not reading all of the info in the entirety but what I did read left me a bit suspicious.
I am not an expert in the law but isn't charging people cash to eat in your home the same as running an un inspected restaurant (unless Michlin is now part of the FDA) ?

Sounds like a fun thing to be part of just kinda shady.

mimi
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

I will admit to not reading all of the info in the entirety but what I did read left me a bit suspicious.
I am not an expert in the law but isn't charging people cash to eat in your home the same as running an un inspected restaurant (unless Michlin is now part of the FDA) ?

Sounds like a fun thing to be part of just kinda shady.

mimi

Good point, there are a few new business types that kind of skirt the law. The new ride services like Uber, and room rentals from Airbnb. I do not know enough about either to say if they are or are not breaking any laws. But I do know that they all seem to be making truck loads of cash from investors. 

post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 

If a diner gets serious food poisoning, who is going to be taking the blame?

 

On a related note, didn't Texas pass some sort of new law recently allowing home cooks to sell stuff to the public without health department certification?

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

If a diner gets serious food poisoning, who is going to be taking the blame?

eatwith's $1,000,000 liability insurance. 

post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

 isn't charging people cash to eat in your home the same as running an un inspected restaurant (unless Michlin is now part of the FDA) ?

Seems like a gray area in law today. After all, airbnb hosts don't have a hotel license, Uber drivers don't have a taxi license, etc...

 

I don't think there's anything suspicious or shady about it. I suppose that eatwith's investors did a bit of research before shelling out their $8,000,000. 

post #10 of 23
Texas (like a lot of states) passed a cottage food law and yes you can bake (as well as make jams, candy and lots of foodstuffs) if the product falls within the low risk for spoilage category .
Yes I can bake from my uninspected kitchen (not that I do) as long as I hold a serve safe certificate (which I do) but there are lots of other rules that must be followed.
I am pretty sure it doesn't cover selling plate lunches to people and then allow them to eat them at my dinner table.
For sure if there is alcohol is involved.

mimi
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

 isn't charging people cash to eat in your home the same as running an un inspected restaurant (unless Michlin is now part of the FDA) ?
Seems like a gray area in law today. After all, airbnb hosts don't have a hotel license, Uber drivers don't have a taxi license, etc...

I don't think there's anything suspicious or shady about it. I suppose that eatwith's investors did a bit of research before shelling out their $8,000,000. 

I had a great experience renting someone's beach home before and will most likely do it again.
The Über thing sounds great.
So great in fact that as soon as I talk to a lawyer friend of mine (old bar customer who owes me so many favors we will be in rocking chairs before we are square lol) I am thinking about applying.
Got lots of time on my hands and low mileage on my SUV lol.
Thanks for bringing it to my attention!

mimi
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

Yes I can bake from my uninspected kitchen (not that I do) as long as I hold a serve safe certificate (which I do) but there are lots of other rules that must be followed.
I am pretty sure it doesn't cover selling plate lunches to people and then allow them to eat them at my dinner table.
For sure if there is alcohol is involved.

But that's for selling your baked goods, not for hosting a party and charging your guests. 

 

Each situation is different. For example, personal chefs have been charging customers money for buying and preparing food for them for decades, yet they aren't inspected by the FDA, and don't require a license. 

 

As for Uber, it's not without its issues either, as you may know if you've followed the news lately. 

post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 

Visiting eaters would probably enjoy nice wine pairings with dinner. Utah's alcohol laws are some of the strangest, most clueless on the planet. I don't see Eatwith doing well in Utah for now.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

Yes I can bake from my uninspected kitchen (not that I do) as long as I hold a serve safe certificate (which I do) but there are lots of other rules that must be followed.

I am pretty sure it doesn't cover selling plate lunches to people and then allow them to eat them at my dinner table.

For sure if there is alcohol is involved.
But that's for selling your baked goods, not for hosting a party and charging your guests. 

Each situation is different. For example, personal chefs have been charging customers money for buying and preparing food for them for decades, yet they aren't inspected by the FDA, and don't require a license. 

As for Uber, it's not without its issues either, as you may know if you've followed the news lately. 

No trying to be stubborn but those Chefs are invited to prepare a meal at the clients home, serving the client's family and friends .
Pretty sure those friends are not asked to pony up the cash to cover the meal (unless it is a fund raiser for political/charity purposes but those laws are even more restrictive)
Like was said before it is a grey area and those grey areas will be different in every country and state (Heck even the counties within those states)

The huge insurance policies are also pretty restrictive.
Now I am curious and will have to keep digging until I have all the facts.
Jeeze thanks @teamfat looks like a late nite spent researching lol.

Mimi
post #15 of 23

This type of business has been going on for years, albeit as an underground operation; not publicized, not backed by a large group with money behind it.  Mostly up and coming chefs with no where to cook and feature their talents.

 

As a Home Cook who would love to entertain, cook and make a mid-sized group of folks, who love food as much as I do, happy, 

why not?

Once a month to start, a rotating menu, BYOB, hour and a half and then you're out the door, that way I don't have to deal with a belligerent drunk... all though if you served the wine, you could control the mayhem, but I prefer the wines that I like and someone else may not.

 

But then again, we live out in the middle of the freakin' desert, who's gonna come out there?

post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post
 

 

But then again, we live out in the middle of the freakin' desert, who's gonna come out there?

 

I doubt any strangers would want to eat at my house as well.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #17 of 23
I enjoy having guests in my home for dinner and parties. I look at my home as a place to relax and live and Im sure this concept would be great fir some people, but not me.
post #18 of 23
I did Eatwith this summer while I was in Rome. It was a lot of fun and I met some fascinating people. The price was reasonable, so I don't think the hosts are making a lot of profit. It would be about the experience and I highly recommend it to anyone.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jellly View Post

I did Eatwith this summer while I was in Rome. It was a lot of fun and I met some fascinating people. The price was reasonable, so I don't think the hosts are making a lot of profit. It would be about the experience and I highly recommend it to anyone.

Thank you for the insight Jellly!

post #20 of 23
I wouldn't mind attending one either.
The fisherman not so much but then again someone who spends a lot of time alone tracking fish and watching birds and squirrels cannot be expected to be a big conversationalist lol.
Don't get me wrong he is fascinating once the topic turns to his field (petrol-chemical refineries and the involved science and world politics) but the first can be pretty dry and the second can quickly devolve into fisticuffs mad.gif

Took a look at the current list and Texas has a few hosts listed.
Might just have to check this out.

mimi
post #21 of 23

mimi, Mr. K~Couple is the same way, maybe you and I should go to dinner and leave them at home :D

but seriously, I've mentioned this to a couple of the folks `round here and they think that I should go for it, 

maybe being a Personal Chef might be more in line out here, I searched the American Personal & Private Chef Assoc. 

and there are no chefs for over 100 miles!

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post
 

I searched the American Personal & Private Chef Assoc. 

and there are no chefs for over 100 miles!

Could be that you just found a niche for yourself there. :)

post #23 of 23

@French Fries but I'm not a chef FF, I have no training, I fly by the seat of my pants right now

There is an online program for Personal Chefs, but, zwooee! the price is at a premium!

I know how to cook, I know how to use a knife, 

but it's the business side I don't know

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking