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Poll to pick new knife

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
It's either gonna be a konosuke hd2 240, or a misono ux10 210 with dimples. Both about the same price, and I have just enough after holiday shopping to be selfish and get my self something. If you had to pick, which would you get?
post #2 of 15
No dimples as far as I'm concerned. Doesn't work, makes the blade unnecessarily thick behind the edge, reduces life span considerably and above all, it's ugly.
No laser either. I don't want to worry about a citrus seed, and do require a decent food release.
For the price of that 210mm UX-10 with dimples you may get TWO outstanding full sized gyutos. Have a look at the Misono Swedish Carbon, the new Kagayaki cladded Aogami #2 or the last Hiromotos -- AS or G3 -- before they are gone.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have many other knives already, and have played with almost all of the above mentioned and the ux10 vs. hd2 is what it's down to. I like to collect very different knives and I neither possess a laser nor a dimpled knife and I like these brands for these applications. I'm not really looking to consider another knife maker right now, although I agree the hiromoto is something for everyone to consider
post #4 of 15

Konosuke HD2 240mm Gyuto for me, it is a great knife.  I also have the Teruyasu Fujiwara Nashiji 240mm Gyuto which is heavier but the sharpest knife I've ever used and you can save a lot of money buying it online @  http://www.teruyasu.net/products/gyuto.html.  I added the ebony handles but if you take the stock handles you can get it for the same price as the others that your considering.

 

Jack

post #5 of 15
If you say a Hiromoto is something for everyone to consider, don't wait. Production has stopped, the maker has retired.
post #6 of 15

As i see it, you should buy both, cause they are totally different, non comparable knives:

 

Carbon steel vs. stainless

240 vs. 210

No dimples vs. dimples

 

Besides, you don't want another brand... so... get both!

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #7 of 15

I would have no use for the Misono, the Kono on the other hand would really float my boat and I would have owned one by now if it came in my preferred alloy.  I believe it can handle a citrus seed just fine, you can whack it against an end-grain board all you like if your technique is decent (my control is inconsistent so I might not do really hard carrots with it and possibly drive it that slippery edge deep into the board), but of course you are not going to butcher a cow with it.

 

 

Rick

post #8 of 15

I say the Konosuke HD2.  Treat yoself and get a handle that isn't ho wood too :D

post #9 of 15

@Benuser what angles are you sharpening at that citrus seed is a problem?  My laser, not konosuke, cut straight through lemon seeds.  Not that I've ever measured the angle I'm sharpening at anyway(i would guess somewhere 12-13 on right, 15-17 on left), just curious.

 

If OP was conservative and sharpened 15 or higher per side it would be a more robust edge?

post #10 of 15

Benuser was given to poetic liscense there with the citrus seed.  If my thinned out  Wusty Ikon at 12/side can handle a lemon seed without folding, I'm sure the Kono can do it all day without chipping.



The guy with the fast hands is not exatly babying the knife here

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=og4hTAzF1gs&feature=player_embedded


Rick
Edited by Rick Alan - 12/16/14 at 5:16pm
post #11 of 15

I wouldn't worry about the Kono HD2 since I got mine 3 weeks ago I use a end grain hard maple cutting board and I chop carrots, turnips, rutabaga, onions and potatoes with ease.  I'm a home cook and was worried about the Kono being "fragile" but it has proven itself on a very hard surface (I made the board from leftovers from my cabinetmakers bench) and it is hard maple.

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Overwhelmingly the kono wins! Thanks guys, you all helped really influence my decision. Guess I know which one I'm buying
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
As a follow up I got the kono and holy smokes, what an incredible flapping knife! It's the holiday and I had requested a little time off to go up to my hometown of flagstaff so other than a slow day tomorrow I won't have a chance to really put it through its paces yet. I did however do the tomato test, and go versus with a sugimoto, and takeda using an apple, acorn squash, and green onions to get a feel for soft/hard/fine. I was truly surprised how easily it slipped through the squash. It's OOTB edge outperformed my Sugi which I haven't sharpened in a couple weeks and is my workhorse. It was more effortless but less precise than the takeda, which is huge and I usually only use for mass prep.
My chef was just talking about getting that exact fujiwara you recommended! They sell it at our local knife house and he seems pretty set on it. I'm very curious. Thank you everyone for all your help, I appreciate your advice.
post #14 of 15

I had that same reaction when I opened the box and used my Kono HD2.. I have to say that the Teruyasu Fujiwara Nashiji 240mm Gyuto is still the sharpest knife OOTB that I have ever seen and if your chef get's one you should compare the two.

 

Jack

post #15 of 15

@alaminute that's great!  Tomato test is good, my test are usually dicing onions, potatoes, carrots to see if it wedges in any of those, which i'm sure a laser like the konosuke will not.

 

@jacko9 ,  OOTB edge is supposed to be pretty rough, so I don't use it as an indicator of performance.  I pretty much take all my knives to the stones right away, granted I buy a lot used,  unless it comes sharpened by an expert.  The edge is intended to be sharpened/ finished by the user.

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