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What is the workflow like for a restaurant serving pancakes? - Page 2

post #31 of 50

Just curious, How many ovens did you have at your disposal to cook 500 pounds of potatoes from raw per day?

post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by CapeCodChef View Post
 

Just curious, How many ovens did you have at your disposal to cook 500 pounds of potatoes from raw per day?


I'm not understanding where that came from.  I clearly did not say anything about cooking 500 lbs of raw potatoes bub.  How many pounds of spuds do you go through on a Sunday just out of curiosity? 

post #33 of 50
The topic is about pancakes and how to sandbag them or not. Not potato fantasies.
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post

The topic is about pancakes and how to sandbag them or not. Not potato fantasies.

 

 

"lolza"

 

 

Post of the week.

post #35 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post

The topic is about pancakes and how to sandbag them or not. Not potato fantasies.

 

To be on topic, I didn't realize chefs advocated sandbagging pancakes, except for Ronald McDonald, who we all know is a clown.

 

Sidenote:  No fantasy bro.  Sorry you're quick to judge based on some bad math I read on here and never worked somewhere that easily breaks $2 million/yr without a bar (or proper sanitation or cooling or background checks), and can do pancakes to order.  Sorry a suburban 5 Guys sells more spuds than you too btw.

 

But to stay on topic:

 

You said that one should make pancakes ahead so you do not run out of grill space.  What are the dimension on that grill you have?  Even if you do flat top eggs with 20-30 at a time all day you must space them out far and/or have a have a small grill.  The place I work at now has a 6 footer and I could not imagine running out of space unless you were doing lots of crepes on it too.  

post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by CapeCodChef View Post
 


No kidding..... And with only 3 guys on a 6' flat top. Using peeled potatoes. Narly spuds with eyes even. And with cheap owners even though they were doing $30k on a weekend with a  4x-5x food cost. lolza indeed.


Your math is WAY off brotha.  With the spuds per plate and the fact that'd be $15/person on average by your reckoning, assuming that everyone got the special and spent an extra buck (same as an omelet or lunch).  And I was accused of hyperbole. It's a big cheap dirty greasy spoon.  This is near the nativity of Dinosaur BBQ, owned by George Soros.  Not some quaint Martha's Vineyard town cafe known for the chef's love of slowing down the pan of eggs when 2 tables turn in 5 minutes.

 

So lets say 8 hours, 300 covers, that's 37.5 covers per hour.  6 hours: 50 covers per hour.  And you don't peel spuds or cook raw home fries.  It's probably hard to hire good help with those numbers; you must fly solo or have the dishwasher expedite and drop toast.  Why do tables turn like only once an hour on average?  Do you get a line out the door? I'm truthfully not being facetious back at you but you obviously do something way different, and thus shouldn't assume every brunch spot outside Cape Cod does whatever it is you do and mock people on false pretenses.  The hottest breakfast spot in my city in my neighborhood right now seats like 130, has a 15 - 20 min wait all morning and has to cut the line off to close on Sunday afternoon.  Dinosaur BBQ is a monster with national buzz.  Lolza is right.  42 seater, 250+ covers.  I've worked in bigger and busier coffee shops.

 

We legally sat 182 without the party room, which would host university club or sports team events and such.  I worked at a gourmet hot dog joint that sat 13 more than you without the patio and did like 800 covers a shift all weekend.  What for you mock me chef? 

 

But to stay on topic:  Was it the pancakes to order that slowed it all down because of the tiny grill my friend? 

post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post

You can hold them for up to a few hours ( covered in a slow oven, alto sham etc), with bad results IMO.

Make them to order they take like 5 minutes. When it is very busy, brunch, do some ahead or you will run out of space on a typical flat top grill.

Yes. McMc, for someone who doesnt like to be misquoted, look at my FIRST post, I said" Bad Results".
Ttyl
post #38 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post

You can hold them for up to a few hours ( covered in a slow oven, alto sham etc), with bad results IMO.

Make them to order they take like 5 minutes. When it is very busy, brunch, do some ahead or you will run out of space on a typical flat top grill.


True story.  You say bad results holding them for a few hours, and then tell him to sandbag anyways.  Then you say you do it and merry xmas somewhere else.  No misquoing bub, sorry for the mix up though.  What is a typical flat top grill to you?  A 4 footer?  And then flat top eggs with everything else?  That's not a lot to work with bro.  No wonder you sandbag pancakes like a drive thru.  You should pan the eggs and make fresh cakes.  Maybe you'll inadvertently up your potato sales when more people come crawling back for fresher food one day.  Then you can pay another guy to cook those eggs and not worry about temp control when you get a real rush.

post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post
 

500 lbs for over 500 tickets.    That's 500+lbs of bagged potatoes, not prepped. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post
 

It'd be about the same for Saturday too. 

 

You cool them whole (not in the cooler, the tub floods and they taste bad) before putting them on the slicer of a box grater.  

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post
 


Your math is WAY off brotha.  With the spuds per plate and the fact that'd be $15/person on average by your reckoning, assuming that everyone got the special and spent an extra buck (same as an omelet or lunch).  And I was accused of hyperbole. It's a big cheap dirty greasy spoon.  This is near the nativity of Dinosaur BBQ, owned by George Soros.  Not some quaint Martha's Vineyard town cafe known for the chef's love of slowing down the pan of eggs when 2 tables turn in 5 minutes.

 

So lets say 8 hours, 300 covers, that's 37.5 covers per hour.  6 hours: 50 covers per hour.  And you don't peel spuds or cook raw home fries.  It's probably hard to hire good help with those numbers; you must fly solo or have the dishwasher expedite and drop toast.  Why do tables turn like only once an hour on average?  Do you get a line out the door? I'm truthfully not being facetious back at you but you obviously do something way different, and thus shouldn't assume every brunch spot outside Cape Cod does whatever it is you do and mock people on false pretenses.  The hottest breakfast spot in my city in my neighborhood right now seats like 130, has a 15 - 20 min wait all morning and has to cut the line off to close on Sunday afternoon.  Dinosaur BBQ is a monster with national buzz.  Lolza is right.  42 seater, 250+ covers.  I've worked in bigger and busier coffee shops.

 

We legally sat 182 without the party room, which would host university club or sports team events and such.  I worked at a gourmet hot dog joint that sat 13 more than you without the patio and did like 800 covers a shift all weekend.  What for you mock me chef? 

 

But to stay on topic:  Was it the pancakes to order that slowed it all down because of the tiny grill my friend? 

I'm having a hard time following your post to determine if you're talking about you or me. Don't see how my math was off. You said 500 tickets , NOT covers, with an average ticket being 3-4 covers. So lets say that's 1,500-2,000 covers or more on Sun. (Same for Saturday, you said, right?) That's 1000 pounds of potatoes and somewhere between 1/4 - 1/2 pound of potatoes per plate. All peeled, cut with a box grater. boiled on a 6 burner, and sandbagged on a 6' grill worked by 3 guys where all the eggs and pancakes were also cooked to order. My math is accurate using your own numbers, $6 special, $1 or 2 over that for people that order juice or a muffin, or something off special x 3000-4000 covers per weekend is approx. $30k. How is it not?

 

If your second paragraph is about me? You're off a bit. We do 250-300 covers in 40 seats over 4-4.5 hours. Average wait in line for a table is 40 mins. on the weekend . Our average seating time with a custom cooked to order b'fast is 35 minute with a ticket average of 6 minutes. 6' grill, 8 burner stove 3 ovens (1 convection)  conveyor toasted with 3 skilled cooks. Average ticket is $14 so we can afford the best help around with an under 22% food cost.

 

I wasn't mocking you, although I did question your veracity. But you've shown your true colors. You mock my store by saying "I've worked in bigger and busier coffee shops."....I'm happy for you. That training must have come in very handy.

 

 

(and lolza at "gourmet hot dog shop".)

post #40 of 50
@IceMan lookin' for that 'WOW' Right about now, 😃👍

There seems to be a lot of pretension regarding 'sandbagging'. To be clear, when your expediter is screaming a steady stream of every item in your station and the ticket machine hasn't stopped printing for half an hour than numbers are lost, a la minute anything except modified orders is unacceptable. IN such occassions your only real choice is to fill your *insert burner choice* with a lot of *insert food* and start building plates. You end up with piles or "sandbags" of food which is usually sold within minutes if not seconds of coming off your heat source. With finesse this technique is achieved in even the finest if restaurants.
post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post
...

 

 

 Didn't read. Done with your little line cook flame war. Best of luck, kid.

post #42 of 50
I'm not reading that either, someone has a lot of time on their hands? Remember we are posting in Professional Chefs forum, lets try to be.
post #43 of 50

Time to get off your soap box.

post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post
 

Time to get off your soap box.


Obviously you want to try mine out.

post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post

Ty Usually you can't ford to pay me.

I think we can all agree on that
post #46 of 50

It's not that none of us can "ford' to pay someone like Mckallidon, it's that none us WANT to

 

Congratulations  McK., with the exception of Iceman, you've managed to p*ss off just about everyone on this board.  And convince just about everyone that you can't cook, and never have worked in a commercial kitchen at all.  You've uh,... "saturated" yerself pretty good, eh?

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #47 of 50
By afford I mean the toll on morale and extra effort to police staff getting undermined and brow beaten.
post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanMcPherson View Post

By afford I mean the toll on morale and extra effort to police staff getting undermined and brow beaten.


I avoid the extra effort involved in that type of employee. I've been around long enough to spot them early so that they rarely last a day or two in my kitchen. They already know all there is to know, so it's just not worth the effort or a minute of my time to attempt to teach and train. We've all seen the type, where the attitude, mouth and level of self importance is ALWAYS greater than the ability.


Edited by CapeCodChef - 2/21/15 at 12:51pm
post #49 of 50
I peel 500lbs of potatoes to order and shave them into intricate designs with a fork and a chopstick to order and I cook them on a charcoal bbq, I cook my pancakes in the sous vide. 200 covers a minute 9 days a week, January to Octember.
post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by anypills View Post

I peel 500lbs of potatoes to order and shave them into intricate designs with a fork and a chopstick to order and I cook them on a charcoal bbq, I cook my pancakes in the sous vide. 200 covers a minute 9 days a week, January to Octember.

lulz:smoking:

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