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How do you serve souffles in your restaurant?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
My new boss wants to put souffles on the menu. Does any one have any advise? I dont know if I can make a batch in advance or is it more of an al la minute thing. I going to play around with it today. Just wanted some professional opinions. Thanks
post #2 of 16

Souffles are a little outdated, but maybe you can make them popular again.  When we did souffles at the hotel they were made to order.  Our main menu had it listed right after the entrees, stating that it takes 20-30 minutes to prepare.  That way guests were aware of them when ordering and not just after dinner when the dessert menu was brought to the table.  When an order came in we would beat the egg whites and fold it into the souffle base (pretty similar to pastry cream), prepare the souffle mold and bake it.  Once done it was immediately sent out to the table (the waiter had better be in the kitchen when it was ready to go) and hopefully the guest had not stepped away for a smoke or to use the restroom as there is no returning it to the kitchen to stay warm  until the guest comes back.  They are a PITA but they also have that "wow" factor and once we sold one you could expect a number of others to follow closely.  But again that was 20 years ago.  Not sure how they'd go over now.  Might be able to pull it off as a "cool" retro dish.

post #3 of 16

Pete is right.  It was one of the classics along with Baked Alaska, Cherries Jubilee and Crepe Suzettes. But now they have an imported mix for soufflés  it's  not bad either just add milk or water. It is not cheap but neither is a real soufflé  from scratch.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 16
Easy peasy, and we did ours with an 18 min. wait time 😃
Make a simple choux, mix whatever flavor you want into the choux to make your base as well as a bunch of gelatin sheets. Fold in egg whites and fill your ramekins. They'll keep for two to three days because if the gelatin and the choux will help th rise. You'll get some perfect little monsters that almost double directly straight up because of the choux. If you want a specific recipe, PM me.
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thank you for the tips...I was on the same page as the rest of you about it being "dated" but we will try it out. Its going to be a trio of souffles maybe 2 oz ramekins. It should cook pretty quick. But its been 8 yrs since I made any souffle.
post #6 of 16
The dessert soufflé is making a comeback on several of the cruise lines.
Served to guests in their gowns and dark suits (have even seen a few tuxes lol) as a finish to a meal of prime rib and lobster tails.
Has the boss recently been on vacation?


mimi
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
He is a new GM and want to try new things...their is nothing wrong with what we are doing now. Just wants to change it up.
post #8 of 16

Served in a 4 ounce Fluted Ramekin in the middle of a napkin daisy on a round dinner plate  served with appropriate sauce on side.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #9 of 16

22 minute timer, presented just like Ed said, but sauced by the server is fancier than sauce on the side IMO.

post #10 of 16

At the table the serve would put a hole in the center of the soufflé and drizzle in a Grand Marnier laced Crème Anglaise.

post #11 of 16
Cant you freeze uncooked souffle mix... seem to recall this being done somewhere... microwave to warm the centre and then pop in the oven
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpoiledBroth View Post

Cant you freeze uncooked souffle mix... seem to recall this being done somewhere... microwave to warm the centre and then pop in the oven


You can freeze the "cooked soufflé base" thaw it, add the whipped eggs whites then continue.

post #13 of 16
Why not freeze after the next step
post #14 of 16
What chefross says makes sense, you can freeze or refridgerate choux/base but I feel like the egg whites would deflate in the defrosting process or worse begin cooking when microwaved from frozen. That being said I've never tried/had to freeze and I don't know....
post #15 of 16
If I may....
Since "retiring" I seem to be using way more yolks than whites.
At first I tried just saving in fridge but never got them used before the danger zone window closed.
So I tried freezing but when I tried to use them (macs or IMBC or whatever) I was never happy with the consistency/stability.
Tried all the usual trix but the results were sub-par.
Could be my OCD but don't think so.
Could be different in a pro setting... I don't know, maybe.

Granted I am talking apples and oranges here.
But I agree with @alaminute
Even if the stabilizers held and there was only a small percent loss of product, on a busy nite that is a loss I wouldn't tolerate when it only takes a stick blender and a moment or two to insure that perfect ending to that perfect meal.

Carry on lol.

mimi

* I know you can pick up a lemon meringue pie from most any grocer's freezer section take home and defrost on the counter top but despite all of the chemical stabilizers still leaks free fluid or water or whatever after portioning.
So hy doesn't someone do a trial run.
I am bored and would be happy to come play in your kitchen lol!

m.
post #16 of 16

Well there are frozen souffles.  Not quite the same.  ;)

 

Anyway you will need to figure it out for your kitchen and for your workflow.  Selling souffles is great for the bottom line.   Coordination is really important from selling the souffle (preorder) to serving it.

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