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Salt on top of fudge turned to water???

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hey all, 

 

New to these forums desperate for help here. 

 

I've been making fudge lately. The last 2 batches I put sea salt on top of one and crushed candy canes on the other. I've kept them in a airtight storage container for the past 2 days. Today I opened the container to find that the salt on one and the candy cane on the other were now in liquid form on top of the fudge.

 

Can anyone help me in figuring out why this happened and how to prevent it from happening again?

 

Thank you!

Natalie 

post #2 of 8

...


Edited by Vic Cardenas - 12/21/14 at 12:13am
post #3 of 8
Hi paperandbirch.... welcome to Chef Talk.
If you have to cover the fudge do it loosely using paper towels then wax or parchment paper and do not refrigerate.
The condensation will be worse as the product comes to room temp.
Keeping in a cool dry place will also help.
The least stress free solution may be to garnish and lightly press it in just before service.

mimi
post #4 of 8
There are 2 popular ways to make fudge.
One is a cooked recipe the other is more of a melt marshmallow and chocolate together stir and pour in a pan recipe.
The cooked one has less free moisture as most was boiled off.
That will be your more stable candy.
It can be left at room temp and maintain texture and shape.
The second one (IMO) needs to be kept a bit cool in order to maintain the mouthfeel associated with fudge.

mimi
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

There are 2 popular ways to make fudge.
One is a cooked recipe the other is more of a melt marshmallow and chocolate together stir and pour in a pan recipe.
The cooked one has less free moisture as most was boiled off.
That will be your more stable candy.
It can be left at room temp and maintain texture and shape.
The second one (IMO) needs to be kept a bit cool in order to maintain the mouthfeel associated with fudge.

mimi

 

Hi Mimi, thank you for responding. You're right the recipe I was using wasn't the cooked version. 

 

The recipe I was using is:

 

3 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips

14oz sweetened condensed milk 

1/4 cup butter. 

 

I melted it over a double broiler and then mixed it in a stand mixer for 5 minutes before pouring into the pan. 

 

It had the best consistency of all the recipes I've tried, but this water droplet thing is driving me nuts. I tried several cooked versions, but hadn't found one that stood up as fudge should. Do you have a great cooked recipe that you could share with me?

 

Thanks 

post #6 of 8
The one I use most has some history.
When my mom was a teenager in the early 1940s a usual Saturday nite was spent at on or another of her friend's home popping popcorn and making fudge for the boys.
They would listen to radio shows and dance to music played on whatever record player they had.
Of course the parents were right there watching every move lol.

Google Hershey Cocoa original fudge recipe.... as I am piled up in my bed with a few grandkids and the fisherman watching a movie if I move someone will wake up.
Unless you can cook candy to correct stage using the ice water test you will need a candy thermometer.
I do both just 'cuz I have OCD lol.

To be honest my favorite fudge is the one made with the chocolate chips and marshmallow fluff.
Reminds me of my paternal Gmother.
Was pretty much the only thing she could whip up without scorching lol.

About the salt/peppermint problem.
I would advise waiting to garnish until right before serving as a really humid day will make just about any candy wilt.

Merry Christmas.

mimi
Edited by flipflopgirl - 12/20/14 at 4:08pm
post #7 of 8

The problem you're having is likely not due to a problem with the fudge recipe at all, but due to the fact that salt is hygroscopic, meaning that it has a tendency to absorb moisture from the air. I've had this same problem with salted caramels, and one way to avoid it is by reducing the humidity of the surrounding air by using desiccants- silica gel packs are probably the safest and most absorbent. Here are some links to a couple different types-

 

http://www.amazon.com/Dry-Packs-Cotton-Silica-Packet-Pack/dp/B0038N30OY 

http://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Silica-Gram-Capsules-Grade/dp/B00FD5VDD0

 

Of course, if you don't really want to buy these (and they are quite cheap) you can always press the salt in right before you serve it. Hope I helped!

post #8 of 8

Yes and sugar is hygroscopic as well. That's why the candy canes melted.

 

P.S. I make the  sweetened condensed milk fudge too. I don't put butter in it though. Mmm!

 

You can heat condensed milk in the microwave in a large glass bowl.  (I use an 8 C pyrex measuring "cup." Make sure you use a big enough container with high sides because it will bubble up.

 

When it's hot stir in the butter and chips until melted. No need to beat for 5 minutes. I think that's only necessary for cooked fudge.

 

This way you only dirty one dish. I'm all about saving on dish washing!

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