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Prime Rib Cooked Faster than Expected

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

For Christmas eve dinner, i cooked a 20lbs, 7 bone prime rib roast. It was cold when i put it in the oven and i thought it would take 14 to 16 hours to cook at 210F, but it only took 5 hours! It came out perfectly with a nice medium rare throughout the entire prime rib, but of course my guests won't be here for another 12 hours. So even though it is perfect, I am not certain of how I should serve it.

Once I took it out of the oven, I covered it in foil, let it sit for 30 min and then stuck it in the fridge to cool. This brings me to my question: how should i serve it? I have considered cold beef au jus sandwiches, but that just isn't as good as straight up prime rib.

 

What would be ideal is to heat it back up, but I'm afraid i will ruin it by heating it again. Should I avoid heating it up, or could I bring it up to room temp and then heat it up to 110F or so with the oven set to 200F? 

post #2 of 16

Just reheat it for about 1.5 hours in a 350F oven until it gets to 120F.  Wrap it in foil.   Keep testing of course.

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Will cooking it at 350 make the meat start to brown? I'd really like to preserve as much of the medium rare as possible.

post #4 of 16

Not really if it's covered in foil.  You can turn the oven back down when it gets to 110.  All you want to do is warm up the inside so it's not cold to the touch.

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

Ok thanks. Are there any food safety issues with having cooked it and then let it sit in the refridgerator? It is still warm to the touch 4 hours later. Do I need to be concerned about bacterial growth? I did transfer it to my garage where is 22F to get it to cool faster.

post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

Also, what does the foil do? keep the direct heat away?

post #7 of 16

Not really for the insides of the beef.  I will give you our servsafe guideline though.

 

Any prepared food needs to be cooled down to 70F in two hours, and from 70-41F in four hours.

post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

I don't think I got it cooled down that fast. Its such a big piece of meat... Its been about 4 hours and it is still warm to the touch. Is that  a problem? Sorry if I'm beating a dead horse, but I only got 3 hours of sleep last night because of this and I just want to be sure I'm not going to make anyone sick.

post #9 of 16


This is called a reheat   Set oven at 250 wrap rib in plastic wrap then heavy aluminum foil 2 to 2 1/2 hours it will be perfect.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #10 of 16

How long has it been out of the oven and what is the internal temperature?

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 

It has been out of the oven for about 5 hours. My thermometer doesn't have markers below 140, but based on the needle's position I'm going to say its probably between 80 and 90 degrees at the center of the meat.

post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks Kaun and chefedb for the advice on the reheat. I'm a little nervous to do a reheat, though, because I had cut an end piece off this morning and tried to reheat it at 210 wrapped in foil. It started browning and loosing its medium rare red color. However, I suspect that is because it is such a small piece of meat (maybe 1/4 to 1/2 lbs) so the bigger piece would probably heat up differently, right?

post #13 of 16

I always used chefedb's method for reheats, always had med-mr reheats.

post #14 of 16

Wrap in PLASTIC WRAP FIRST  THEN WRAP IN HEAVY FOIL 

. Meat will not brown any more then when you put it in, The wrap locks in the moisture and creates a damp moist heat instead of roasting, which is a dry heat. In actuality you are using part steam to reheat the rib. Never had a problem or a return with this method.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the help! 

 

I couldn't bring myself to reheat it at 350, but I did reheat it between 225-250 for about 2.5 hours. I didn't use plastic, just covered it in aluminum foil, but it came out great! I learned my lesson about cooking times for this meat...

 

I didn't get a picture of it warmed up, but I took this picture of it this morning after I cut a slice off for breakfast. You can see that after the reheat it still looks nice and red! 

 

post #16 of 16

Nice.  :)  I'd say "well done," but good job is more appropriate.   :D

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